1990-03 – DOE – Radiological Characterization Report for FUSRAP properties in the St. Louis, Missouri, Area

DOE/OR/20722-203 o 19 RADIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR FUSRAP PROPERTIES IN THE ST. LOUIS.... View Document

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2005-01-07 – DOE – NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY HAUL ROAD ANALYSIS AND JUSTIFICATION FOR ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION – EVALUATION OF INACCESSIBLE MATERIALS BENEATH PAVEMENTS

REPLY TO
ATTENTION OF:
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
ST. LOUIS DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS
8945 LATTY AVENUE RECEIVED
BERKELY, MISSOURI 63134
January 20,2005 JAN 2 1 2005
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
SUPERFUND DIVISION
Subject: Final Version of North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for
Additional Investigation – Evaluation of Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements dated
January 7,2005
Mr. Dan Wall
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
Region VII, Superfund Branch
901 North Fifth Street
Kansas City, KS 66101-2907
Dear Mr. Wall:
Please find enclosed a copy ofthe North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and
Justification for Additional Investigation – Evaluation of Inaccessible Materials Beneath
Pavements Final, dated January 7,2005 for your records. The responses to comments on the
subject document were sent under separate cover on December 22,2004.
If you need any additional information or have any questions regarding this document, please
contact me at (314) 260-3915.
Sincerely,
Sharon R. Cotner
FUSRAP Program Manager
Enclosiu-es
CF: Mr. Robert Geller
40327800 lliil
Superfund
RECEIVED
JAN 2 1 2005
SUPERhUNU DIVISION
FINAL
NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY HAUL ROAD
ANALYSIS AND JUSTIFICATION FOR
ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION – EVALUATION
OF INACCESSIBLE MATERIALS BENEATH
PAVEMENTS
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
JANUARY 7,2005
Prepared by
U. S. Army Corp of Engineers, St. Louis District Office,
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
With assistance from
Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
Under Contract No. DACW43-00-D-051S
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION PAGE
1.0 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE 1
2.0 SITE BACKGROUND AND HISTORY 2
2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS 3
2.2 METHODS OF POSSIBLE IMPACT 7
2.2.1 How Impacts May Have Been Caused By Truck Transportation 8
2.2.2 Protection ofthe Materials Under Pavements From Direct Impacts 8
2.2.3 Low Probability of Occurrence Mechanisms that Could Result in Impacts
Under Road Pavements 8
2.3 CONSIDERATIONS AND PROCEDURES 9
2.4 HISTORICAL FIELD-TESTING 10
2.4.1 Results Ofhiitial Testing Under Roads 11
2.5 HAUL ROUTES BETWEEN THE SLAPS AND THE HISS/FUTURA SITE 16
2.5.1 Evaluation of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS. 23
2.5.2 Methods for Transporting Residues Between the SLAPS and the HISS 23
2.5.3 Conclusions 25
2.6 RESEARCH SUMMARY 26
3.0 SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY ROADS 33
3.1 SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF HISTORICAL TESTING 33
3.2 TYPICAL RIGHT-OF-WAY WIDTHS 40
3.3 AREAS OF FILL 41
3.4 BRIDGES 41
3.5 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 45
4.0 REFERENCES 46
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LIST OF APPENDICES
A.l McDonnell Boulevard A-1
Figures Ml Through M8
A.2 1-270, Including Pershall & Dunn Roads… A-5
Figures PI Through P8
A.3 Eva Avenue A-8
Figures El Through E2
A.4 Frost Avenue I A-11
Figures Fl Through F2
A.5 Hazelwood Avenue A-16
Figures HI Through H4
A.6 Latty Avenue A-20
Figures Ll Through L3
A.7 1-170 A-25
Figures II Through 17
A.8 Lindbergh Boulevard A-28
Figures LBl Through LB3
A.9 North Hanley And Graham Road A-31
Figures HAI Through HA7
A.IO Airport Road A-35
Figures Al Through A3
A.ll Banshee Road…. A-37
Figures Bl Through B3
A.12 Poison Road A-40
Figures Al Through A3
A.13 Seeger Industrial Road A-42
Figures SI Through SI
A.14 Pavement Evaluation Of Nyflot Avenue A-44
Figures
A.15 Selected Historical Documents A-46
REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
RD 1 Copy Of “History Of Material Storage At The St. Louis Airport Storage Site” A-47
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LIST OF EXHIBITS
EXHIBIT A – Investigation Under Road Pavement
EXHIBIT B – Key Map of Figures Included in Appendices
LIST OF TABLES
SECTION PAGE
Table 2-1 Comparison of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS 23
Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available 27
Table 3-1 Possible Impacts from Haulage SLAPS and the HISS 1966/67 …. 35
Table 3-2 Possible Impacts from Haulage HISS and West Lake Landfill 1973. 36
Table 3-3 Potential Wind, Stormwater or Floodwater Impacts 37
Table 3-4 Results of Testing 38
Table 3-5 Summary of Findings 39
Table 3-6 Cause of Impacts :.— 40
LIST OF FIGURES
SECTION PAGE
Figure 2-1 General Location of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, HISS,
and West Lake LandfiU Storage Sites in St. Louis, Missouri 12
Figure 2-2 Diagram of Route Scanned in the Vicinity of the Mallinckrodt Chemical
Plant Site, St. Louis, Missouri………………………………………………………………… 13
Figure 2-3 Diagram of Routes Scanned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Routes
Characterized by Bechtel National, Inc. in the Vicinity of the Lambert-St.
Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri 14
Figure 2-4 Locations of Impacts Found By Testing 15
Figure 2-5 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route A Most Direct Route 17
Figure 2-6 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route B 18
Figure 2-7 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route C 19
Figure 2-8 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route D 20
Figure 2-9 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route E 21
Figure 2-10 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route F 22
Figure 2-11 USGS Quad Map Locations 30
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Illustration 2.1 Typical 1960 20-Ton Over-the-Road Dump Truck 25
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
AC
AEC
aka
B&K
BNI
CADD
CDC
DOE
EPA
HISS
MoDOT
NRC
ORNL
OU
PCC
ROW
SAIC
SLAPS
SLDS
SOR
USGS
asphaltic concrete
Atomic Energy Commission
also known as
B&K Construction Inc.
Bechtel National, Inc.
computer-aided design and drafting
Commercial Discoimt of Chicago
United States Department of Energy
United States Envirormiental Protection Agency
Hazelwood Interim Storage Site
Missouri Department of Transportation
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Oak Ridge National Laboratories
Operable Units
Portland cement concrete
right-of-way
Science Applications Intemational Corporation
St. Louis Airport Site
St. Louis Downtown Site
sum of ratios
United States Geological Survey
DEFINITIONS:
Impact – Subject to the potential presence of residue.
Impervious – Will not allow the passage of fluid or dust.
Material – Any natural soil or manmade substance beneath a road pavement.
Obliterated – Completely demohshed and removed leaving no clear traces.
Residue – Waste byproducts fi-om processing activities carried out at Mallinckrodt Chemical
Works in downtown St. Louis.
Right-of-way – Land subject to an easement for the passage ofthe public and other public uses.
Road pavements – The hard, durable, impervious, manmade surface covering of a street
designed for the passage of vehicles.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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1.0 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE
This report determines the potential location of possibly impacted materials beneath road
pavements around the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) and the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site
(HISS). This report is limited to evaluating materials near or underlying the roadways located
within an area referred to as the SLAPS Road Study Area. The area to be studied is bounded by
the following roadways (See Exhibit A):
On the West by Lindbergh Boulevard,
On the North by Interstate 270,
On the East by Graham Road and North Hanley Road,
On the South by Airport Road to its intersection with McDonnell Boulevard and with
McDonnell Boiilevard to its intersection with Banshee Road and then with Banshee Road
This determination was accomplished by reviewing available records of pavement histories, road
construction dociunents, historical aerial photographs, available pavement borings, historical
maps and documents, site investigations, and other miscellaneous documents to determine when
and how these pavements were constructed and when and how the materials beneath these
pavements may have been potentially impacted by residue hauling or other possible means of
residue transportation.
Impervious pavements that existed during the period of possible impacts protected the
imderlying material fi-om direct exposure to residue; therefore, there is no need to subject those
materials to fiirther investigation. Conversely, fiirther investigation is needed in the areas where
pavements were constructed over materials possibly impacted by prior exposure to residues.
This report examines the history of road pavements relative to the effects fix)m residues in the
SLAPS Road Study Area.
This report
• Identifies the changes in road surface location, type of construction, right-of-way, and
pavement widths for the SLAPS Road Study Area roads from 1946 to the present (2004).
• Determines whether the road surfaces prevented residue from migrating from the surface to
directly affect the material beneath that pavement.
• Identifies where pavements have been constructed over areas possibly previously impacted
by residue. This residue originates from residue hauling activities or water and wind erosion
from the storage of wastes in the SLAPS Road Study Area.
• Evaluates the historical evidence, in conjunction with evidence from field-testing, to
determine where fiirther investigation is warranted.
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Those properties along each roadway which have been identified as vicinity properties are listed
in the following table.
Table 1-1 Vicinity Properties adjoining roadways
Road Segment
Eva Avenue
Hazelwood Avenue
Latty Avenue
Frost Avenue
1-170
1-270
Lindbergh Boulevard
North Hanley Road
Graham Road
Airport Road
Banshee Road
Pershall and Ehmn roads
Poison Road
Seeger Industrial Drive
Nyflot Road
McDonnell Boulevard
Vicinity Proprieties
16, 17,18,19
24, 31 A, 32, 33, 34, 35, 35A, 37, 38, 39, 39A, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44,
45,46,47,48,48A, 53
35, 37,38, 39, 39A
19, 20,20A, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31
31,31A,33,34,35,39,39A,50
48A, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 63A
3,63
52
15
15
14A
48,48A, 49, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62,
55,56
21,22,23,24, 32
39,41
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,14A, 15, 16
2.0 SITE BACKGROUND AND HISTORY
Starting in the early 1940s, uranium metal and other radioactive substances were produced at the
MaUinckrodt Chemical Works in St. Louis, Missouri. These facilities, as well as other properties
in their vicinity, are now collectively known as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS). Beginning
in 1946 the residue from this processing operation was transported to and stored on a 21.7-acre
property that is located north of St. Louis Mimicipal Airport (now Lambert-St. Louis
Intemational Airport). This parcel and surrounding areas are collectively now known as the
SLAPS. The site was used for the storage of residues from 1946 to 1967. The residues were
transported from the SLDS to the SLAPS by truck over public roadways. In 1966 the residues
were sold to a private company, the Continental Mining and Milling Company (Continental),
which transported the residues from the SLAPS over the public roadways to a second site for
eventual reprocessing and shipment by rail to Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City,
Colorado. This second site, 9200 Latty Avenue, is located south of Latty Avenue and east of
Coldwater Creek. This property and the surrounding properties are collectively known as the
Latty Avenue Site. The area was used to store residues from 1966 to 1973. The SLAPS and the
Latty Avenue Site are collectively known as the North St. Louis County Sites.
After the removal of the residues from the SLAPS by Continental, the SLAPS site was
transferred to the control of the St. Louis Airport Authority. The structures at the site were
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demolished and buried on-site. In 1970, approximately 1 to 3 feet of fill from airport
construction projects was brought to the SLAPS and spread over the site. This fill and the
retuming trucks traveled over public roadways.
After the removal of much ofthe residue from the HISS by rail transport to Colorado, a portion
ofthe remaining residues were removed and transported over the public roads to the West Lake
Landfill facility for disposal. This activity occurred in 1973.
During all of these activities, the residues were stored on the open ground with few engineering
controls to prevent erosion by water or wind action. The HISS and the SLAPS are also partially
within the floodplain of Coldwater Creek.
2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS
The residue from the Mallinckrodt refining operation is the potential source of impacts along the
roads. The events listed chronologically below are relevant to determining the possible inipacts
to roads.
• On April 24, 1941, Mallinckrodt began processing uranium ore in downtown St. Louis.
Mallinckrodt continued uranium refining in downtown St. Louis until 1959. These activities
were performed imder contracts with the Manhattan Engineer District and the United States
Atomic Energy Commission (AEC).
• In 1945 the Manhattan Engineering District began the process of looking for a 5-acre site to
store residues from the SLDS. The need for the land was urgent because there was no room
to store these residues at the downtown plant. The preferred land was to be:
– Fairly isolated or easily capable of isolation by the erection of fences
– Not subject to floods or excessive ground drainage
– Readily available, and preferably located to the north or northwest ofthe city.
• On March 2, 1946, permission was obtained to use the SLAPS for the storage of residues.
Actual title was not acquired until January 3, 1947. This land was acquired by
condemnation. Due to the “unfavorable publicity” generated by the condemnation
proceedings, a decision was made to erect a fence around the site. Most of the wastes and
residues were stored on open ground.
• From 1946 through 1958, residues were transported to the SLAPS for storage, mostly from
Mallinckrodt in downtown St. Louis. Private contractors using government-supplied
equipment transported the residues over the public roadways.
• In 1948 and 1949, highly radioactive radium-bearing residues were transferred from the
SLAPS to Femald, Ohio.
• In 1952, “several hundred tons of contaminated metal and debris” were buried at the SLAPS
under 6 to 8 feet of fill obtained from McDonnell Aircraft.
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• In 1954, sixty tons of captured Japanese uranium residues and approximately 500 tons of
other “low grade uranium bearing residues” were brought to the SLAPS from Middlesex,
New Jersey.
• In an inventory ofthe site dated April 11, 1959, it is stated that the following residues had
been deUvered to the SLAPS:
Pitchblende Raffmate, AM-7 74,000 tons
Raffinate, AM-10 32,500 tons
Slag, C-liner 7,800 tons
Interim Residue Plant Tailings, C-701 5,400 tons
Barium Cake, AJ-4 10,200 tons
Vitro residues 290 tons
Captured Japanese Uranium precipitates 60 tons
55,000 30^ and 50-gal drums as scrap 3.500 tons
Total tons hauled to the SLAPS prior to 1960 133,750 tons
These values were based on weight of residues delivered to the site with no adjustment for
moisture pickup.
Source: March 22,1960 drawing titled MCW DWG #6-1403-19-C.
See Reference Document No. 1 for a copy of a document titled History of Material
Storage at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, which contains a description of the
residue designations listed above and additional information conceming the origins
and disposition ofthe residues.
• In 1959, a raihoad siding and loading facilities were constructed at the SLAPS.
• In 1960, Federal Division of Raw Materials explored disposal ofthe residues. Per their June
1960 memo, the refined value ofthe cobalt, nickel, copper and selenium in the residues was
believed to be $15,000,000 to $20,000,000. In addition the residues contained 250,000
pounds of uranium, the value of which was not included in the $15,000,000 to $20,000,000.
• In 1962, bids were invited on the residues, and an award was made to Contemporary Metals
Corporation, Los Angeles (Contemporary); however. Contemporary failed to fiimish the
$50,000 performance bond and pay the $126,500 bid and defaulted on the contract.
Contemporary did no work on the site.
• Two additional invitations to bid were issued in 1964, neither of which produced a
responsive bid.
• In 1964, 4,000 tons of C-Oxide residues were shipped either to Femald, Ohio for processing
or to Weldon Spring for storage.
• A September 23,1965, Memo titled St. Louis Airport Resides listed the inventory for another
invitation to bid to be following five categories of residues. Separate bids were invited for
each category.
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Pitchblende Raffinate 74,000 tons
Colorado Raffinate 32,500 tons
Barium Cake, unbleached 1,500 tons
Barium Cake, leached 8,700 tons
Miscellaneous Material in Dmms 350 tons
The memo also discussed the proposed remediation ofthe site as follows:
“The major problem would appear to be in 5 acres in the west end of the area. This was
originally low swampy ground, drained by a couple of ditches. It was filled and graded and then
the Colorado Raffinate, some dmmmed material and contaminated waste of all kinds were buried
on this fill. However, there is buried somewhere in the fill about six carloads of metal scrap, an
unknoAvn quantity of drums, and a jeep.”
• In February 1966, Continental Mining and Milling (Continental) purchased the five residue
items listed above for $126,500. Continental then borrowed $2,500,000 from Commercial
Discount of Chicago (CDC) for the processing operation. The residues are believed to have
totaled 117,000 tons. Continental later purchased 7,800 tons of C-Liner Slag for an
additional $14,000.
• On December 21, 1965, the Village of Hazelwood approved the use of the 9200 Latty
Avenue property by Continental for refining operations.
• On February 14, 1966, AEC gave Continental a Source Material License for “Removal of
stockpile residues from 50 Brown Road, Robertson, Missouri, and storage only at the
licensee’s facilities located at 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri, in accordance with
the procedures described in the licensee’s application dated Febmary 4, 1966, and
supplements dated February 7 and Febmary 8,1966.”
• On February 28,1966, AEC gave Continental Notice to Proceed to remove the residues from
the SLAPS. Continental was given 400 days, until April 4,1967, to complete the task.
• In a five-month period, some time between March 1966 and April 1967, the residues were
moved from the SLAPS to the HISS by a hauling contractor hired by Contmental. This
move required ten dump tmcks for a period of five months and cost Continental $100,000.
• On Febraary 3, 1967, CDC foreclosed on Continental’s loan. CDC became the owner ofthe
residues and the HISS property at a public sale.
• February 14, 1967, the AEC provided a “punch list” of items in need of completion at the
SLAPS before April 4, 1967 in order for AEC to declare the work complete. One of the
punch list items was to remove an “apparently abandoned” haulage truck from the SLAPS.
• On April 14, 1967, the AEC wrote Hartford Accident & Indenmity Company stating that
Continental had not responded to earlier letters so “we (AEC) would assume from our
knowledge, that we can expect no fiirther action by them, so that we must, apparently, look to
you (Hartford) for finishing the work.” Hartford apparently paid to complete the clean-up
and AEC released their performance bond.
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• In 1967, CDC attempted to sell the residues; there were no bidders. The residues at the HISS
were estimated at 100,000 tons.
• From 1967 to 1968, CDC began drying the residues under an NRC license. The dried
residues were shipped to Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City, Colorado. By the end
of 1968,47,000 tons of residues had been shipped.
• In 1969, no activity took place at the HISS. The remaining residues were sold to Cotter
Corporation.
• In 1969, the SLAPS was transferred to the St. Louis Airport Authority. The St. Louis
Airport Authority demolished the existing buildings and buried the demolition debris on-site.
The SLAPS was then covered with approximately 3 feet of clean fill. In 1970, this fill was
tmcked in from the construction of Lambert-St. Louis Intemational Airport.
• In 1970, Cotter Corporation resumed drying operations and shipped all but 18,700 tons of
residues to Canon City, Colorado.
• In 1973, the Cotter Corporation hired B&K Constmction Inc. (B&K), a St. Ann, Missouri
road constmction company, to load the remaining residues onto rail cars for shipment to
Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City, Colorado. Approximately 10,000 tons of
residues were shipped to Cotter Corporation in Canon City, Colorado without drying.
• In 1973, B&K disposed ofthe remaining residues (8,700 tons of leached barium sulfate cake)
at the West Lake Landfill. It is uncertain what occurred. B&K billed Cotter for shipment of
50,000 tons, but B&K and others state that only 9,000 tons were actually sent to the landfill.
The AEC was told that the remaining 8,700 tons of residue were mixed with 40,000 tons of
soil prior to being sent to the landfill, but it does not appear that this actually occurred.
• In 1976 and 1977, the HISS (it was then know as the Latty Avenue site) was evaluated by the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission for release for unrestricted use. Additional efforts were
found to be needed.
• In 1984, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report titled Post-Remedial Action
Report for the Hazelwood Site describing the testing performed to allow the cities of
Berkeley and Hazelwood to design a new Latty Avenue road pavement and storm sewer
system.
• In 1985, the DOE conducted mobile gamma scanning to detect any anomalies associated
with the transportation routes between the Latty Avenue Properties and the West Lake
Landfill. Impacts were found on McDonnell Boulevard, Pershall Road, and Hazelwood
Avenue.
• In 1986, DOE directed Bechtel National, Inc. to provide radiological support to the cities of
Berkeley and Hazelwood during the Latty Avenue road and storm sewer improvement
project. During this time concentrations of radium-226 and thorium-230 contamination in
excess of DOE remedial action guidelines were found along and under Latty Avenue. The
asphalt pavement itself was also found to be impacted. The existing asphaltic concrete (AC)
pavement was removed, as well as some of the material formerly under the pavement. A
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new Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavement was constmcted. The impacted material
was removed and stockpiled on the HISS.
• In 1986, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) issued a report entitled Results of the
Radiation Measurements Taken of Transportation Routes (LM004) in Hazelwood, Missouri.
This report indicated that anomahes were found along Pershall Road between Lindbergh
Boulevard and Poison Lane, along Hazelwood Avenue between Pershall Road and Latty
Avenue, and along McDonnell Boulevard between Byassee and Coldwater Creek. This
smdy was a follow-up to the 1985 DOE mobile gamma scanning listed previously.
• In 1990, in a report entitled Radiological Characterization Report for FUSRAP Properties in
the St. Louis, Missoxiri Area, Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) stated that, based on subsurface
drilling and testing, “In general, radioactive contamination is present in some areas
underneath Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, and Pershall Road, and contamination
exists along both sides of Hazelwood Avenue and Pershall Road.”
• In 1991, the DOE conducted mobile ganuna scanning to detect anomahes. Anomalies were
detected on McDonnell Boulevard, Pershall Road, and Hazelwood Avenue.
2.2 METHODS OF POSSIBLE IMPACT
The possible sources of residues which may have impacted materials, which are now under
pavement, are hsted below.
• Residue from SLDS was placed at SLAPS from 1946 through 1959.
• Residue was hauled by tuck between the SLAPS and the HISS in 1966 and 1967.
• Fill material was brought by tmck from airport constmction projects to the SLAPS site and
the empty tmcks retumed to the airport m 1969 and 1970.
• Residue was hauled by tmck from the HISS to the West Lake Landfill in 1973.
• Storm water erosion from the SLAPS and the HISS site does not appear to have been
rigorously controlled. Aerial photographs from the early 1950s show tiie SLAPS drainage
ditches along interior roadways and around the stockpile areas, which discharge into
Coldwater Creek. Storm water would have carried residue into these ditches and then into
the Coldwater Creek floodplain.
• Wind erosion from the SLAPS and the HISS site does not appear to have been rigorously
controlled. The residues stored at the SLAPS were reported to be in piles 20 to 25 feet in
height, which would be higher than the surrounding terrain. The 20-foot height is given in a
June 13, 1991 document by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This document
states that “At the SLAPS site the uranium processing wastes were stored on open ground
and once covered two-thirds ofthe area to an estimated height of 20 feet.” A 25-foot height
is given in a 1959 memo as the height of a “Pitchblende Raffinate stockpile”.
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2.2.1 How Impacts May Have Been Caused By Truck Transportation
Some possible mechanisms for the loss of residue during transportation by tmck include, but are
not limited to, spillage from tmcks, dusting from driving at high speeds while hauling uncovered
residue, and falling of residue and residue contaminated earth from vehicle undercarriages, beds,
and wheels. Any areas adjoining traveled pavements not covered by other hard-surface
pavements might have been impacted.
A conceivable, but unlikely, mechanism for contamination, would involve mechanical
breakdowns or accidents involving the loaded tmcks. In the event of an accident or breakdown
of loaded vehicles, it is some times necessary for safety reasons that the load be dumped prior to
repairing or towing of the vehicle. Should one of these uncommon occurrences have occurred
involving a vehicle hauling residue if could have resulted in impact to areas on or near the
roadways used to transport residues.
2.2.2 Protection of the Materials Under Pavements From Direct Impacts
Hard-surface pavements should have shielded the materials directly beneath them from direct
impacts, while any areas adjoining hard-surface pavements (i.e., unpaved road shoulder and
nearby unpaved areas) could have been impacted. Hard-surface pavements are considered to be
Portland cement concrete (PCC) or batch-mixed and -placed asphaltic concrete (AC) pavement
of sufficient thickness to shield the material beneath. Oil-and-chip pavements, penetration AC
pavements, or seal-coat-over-aggregate pavements are not considered sufficiently durable or
nonporous to eliminate the potential for direct impacts to the material beneath them. Used in this
report , unless otherwise noted, AC refers to batch-mixed and -placed AC of sufficient thickness
and strength to prevent direct impacts to material beneath that pavement. Areas not covered with
hard surface pavements could have been impacted. Those areas could have subsequently been
paved as the result of new road constmction, rending the impacted material under the later
constmcted pavement inaccessible.
2.2.3 Low Probability of Occurrence Mechanisms that Could Result in Impacts Under
Road Pavements
There are several mechanisms that would result in impacts under otherwise impervious
pavements. Such mechanisms would include those described below.
Placement of new utilities. It is a common practice to place utility services within public rightof-
ways (ROWs) and sometimes under the road pavement. Such utility placement can resuh in
the removal of the existing pavement, trenching, backfilling, and replacement of the paved
surface. It is possible that the backfill material could be impacted material “borrowed” from
nearby road ROW or that the excavated material would be stored on impacted ground and
become impacted. Utilities could include, but would not be limited to, storm and sanitary
sewers, water, gas, electric, and communications lines. Boring, jacking, or other underground
tunneling methods could also be used to place such utilities. Therefore, any utility placement
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could have resulted in the movement of impacted material to locations that were previously
protected by pavement.
Repair of existing utilities. All utilities are subject to failure, and the repair and replacement of
failed utilities could have resulted in the placement of impacted materials to locations that were
previously protected by pavement. Water and sewer failures could also have resulted in the
movement of impacted material within the soil.
Structural failure of pavement, AC, or PCC. Such a failure could have allowed a route for
impacting agents to enter locations that are under the pavement. Also, the repair of stmctural
failures generally requires the removal and replacement of the existing surface and any failed
subgrade material. Pavement repairs could have resulted in the movement of possibly impacted
material to locations that were previously protected by pavement.
Pavement reconstruction. Impacts could have also resulted when an existing impervious
pavement was obliterated and a new pavement constmcted to replace it. The constmction
activities of demolishing and removing the old pavement, the regrading ofthe new subgrade, and
the constmction of the new pavement could have moved impacted material from Ihe former
shoulder area to beneath the new pavement.
While the mechanisms listed above could result in impacts to material located under otherwise
protective pavements, the conclusions of this report are based on the judgment that the chances
of such impacts are too low to justify additional testing of inaccessible material under substantial
pavemients. The material under such hard-surfaced and impermeable pavements is considered to
have been protected from direct impacts.
2.3 CONSIDERATIONS AND PROCEDURES
The purpose of this report is to identify those materials under currently existing pavements that
may have been impacted by residue lost during residue hauling activities, residues transported by
stormwater or wind erosion, and residues transported by stormwater flooding. This report
includes determmations for where the testing of materials under the pavement could find such
impacted material.
The conclusions ofthis report are based on the following considerations:
• Residues would not have directly impacted those areas protected by hard-surface pavements
prior to 1946.
• Pavements constmcted prior to 1966 would have protected the materials beneath them from
direct impacts from the 1966 and 1967 hauling activities between the SLAPS and the HISS.
• Pavements constincted after 1966, adjacent to tiie 1966 and 1967 tiie SLAPS-to-tiie-HISS
hauling routes could possibly have been placed over directly impacted materials.
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• Pavements constmcted after 1946 within the floodplain of Coldwater Creek downstream of
the SLAPS could possibly have been placed over materials impacted by residue transported
by water erosion and flooding.
Pavements constmcted after 1946 adjacent to the SLAPS could possibly have been placed
over materials impacted by residue transported by wind erosion.

2.4 HISTORICAL FIELD-TESTING
• In 1985, ORNL issued a report entitled Results of Mobile Gamma Scanning Activities in
Berkeley, Bridgeton, .andHazelwood, Missouri, which stated in part.”
“No anomalies were detected from the intersection of Pershall Road and Lindbergh
Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Natural Bridge Road (Highway 115), and Natural
Bridge Road to St. Charles Rock Road to the West Lake Landfill entrance. Also no
anomalies were detected on North Hanley from 1-270 to Airport Road, Airport Road,
Frost Avenue, and Eva Avenue. Anomalies were detected on McDonnell Boulevard,
south side, from Coldwater Creek to the intersection of Norfolk Southern Railroad
crossing and on the north side of McDonnell Boulevard from the Berkeley city limits to
Trumbell Asphalt sign near Byassee Road. Anomalies were detected along Pershall
Road, south side, from the Ford Motor Company, new car parking area, to just past
Poison Lane and on the north side of Pershall Road. Anomalies were also detected on
Hazelwood Avenue, mainly on the west side of the street, in front of Wetterau Perishable
Center approximately 115 feet south from the railroad crossing of Latty Avenue and one
spot on the west side of Hazelwood Avenue”.
• In 1986, ORNL issued another report, entitled Results ofthe Radiation Measurement Taken
of Transportation Routes (LM004) in Hazelwood, Missouri. This report identified
concentrations of higher-than-background radiation readmgs on McDonnell Boulevard
between Coldwater Creek and Byassee Road, on Hazelwood Avenue north of Latty Avenue,
and on Pershall Road between Poison Road and Lindbergh Boulevard. These were the only
routes surveyed for this report.
• In 1990, in a report entitled Radiological Characterization Report for FUSRAP Properties in
the St. Louis, Missouri Area, Bechtel National, Inc. stated that, based on subsurface drilling
and testing, “In general, radioactive contamination is present in some areas underneath Latty
Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, and Pershall Road, and contamination exists along both
sides of Hazelwood Avenue and Pershall Road.”
• In 1991 DOE conducted mobile gamma scanning surveys to detect any anomalies associated
with the transportation routes around the SLAPS. The following roads near the SLAPS were
scanned:
St. Charles Rock Road from Fee Fee Road to Taussig Road
Fee Fee Road from St. Charles Rock Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Taussig Road from St. Charles Rock Road to Gist Road
Gist Road from Taussig Road to Garret Road
Garret Road from Gist Road to Missouri Bottom Road
Natural Bridge Road from St. Charles Rock Road to Lindbergh Boulevard
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Lindbergh Boulevard from Natural Bridge Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Banshee Road from Lindbergh Boulevard to McDonnell Boulevard
McDonnell Boulevard from Lindbergh Boulevard to Airport Road
McDonnell Boulevard from Fee Fee Road to Dunn Road
Dunn Road from McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard
Pershall Road from Lindbergh Boulevard to North Hanley Road
North Hanley Road from Dunn Road to Airport Road
Airport Road from North Hanley Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Eva Avenue from McDormell Boulevard to Frost Avenue
Hazelwood Avenue from Frost Avenue to Pershall Road
Frost Avenue from Eva Avenue to North Hanley Road
Latty Avenue from the HISS to North Hanley Road
The results were issued in a report titled Results of Mobile Gamma Scanning Activities in
St. Louis, Missouri. ORNL. This report also collected results from and discussed all of the prior
mobile gamma scanning testing activities. Figures illustrating the roads, which were scanned,
are reproduced as Figures 2-1, 2-2, and 2-3. Figure 2-1 shows the general location of the
Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, the HISS, and West Lake Landfill storage sites,
St. Louis, Missouri. Figure 2-2 is a diagram of routes scanned in the vicinity ofthe MalUnckrodt
Chemical Plant site, St. Louis, Missouri. Figure 2-3 is a diagram of routes scanned by ORNL and
routes characterized by BNI. in the vicinity of the Lambert-St. Louis Intemational Airport, St.
Louis, Missouri.
• This survey found no anomahes on the suspected haul routes in the vicinity of the
Mallinckrodt plant that could not be explained by factors other than haulage activities. The
survey found impacts along Latty Avenue from the HISS to Graham Road and confirmed the
impacts found along other haul routes in past surveys.
2.4.1 Results Of Initial Testing Under Roads
At least 1,632 samples have been collected in areas that are in or near existing road pavements.
Of these, 127 have individual test results exceeding remediation goals proposed in the Record of
Decision for umestricted release. These points are shown on the drawings contained in the
appendices. These data were obtained from the FUSRAP primary sample database and represent
the test results from many sources compiled into a common elecfronic format.
Figure 2-4 shows the roadways in or around which residue has been detected that may exceed
remediation goals in the proposed Record of Decision.
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Figure 2-1 General Location of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, HISS,
and West Lake Landfill Storage Sites in St. Louis, Missouri
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Figure 2-2 Diagram of Route Scanned in the Vicinity of the Mallinckrodt Chemical
Plant Site, St. Louis, Missouri
^
0»(LFOiW09Ml2S7
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Figure 2-3 Diagram of Routes Scanned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Routes
Characterized by Bechtel National, Inc. in the Vicinity of the Lambert-St.
Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri
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2.5 HAUL ROUTES BETWEEN THE SLAPS AND THE HISS/FUTURA SITE
In fransporting residue between the SLAPS and the HISS, the probable roads fraveled include
Eva Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue, Latty Avenue, Frost Avenue, 1-270, Lindbergh Boulevard
(also known as (aka) Highway 66/67), McDonnell Boulevard (aka Brown Road, State Route TT
or STT), Pershall Road (aka 1-270 Soutii Outer Road), Dunn Road (aka 1-270 Nortii Outer Road),
Graham Road (aka North Hanley Road), and Airport Road.
While there are many potential routes to get from one site to the other, the most direct route
involves a portion of McDonnell Boulevard from the SLAPS to Eva Avenue, Eva Avenue to
Frost Avenue, Frost Avenue to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue, and
Latty Avenue to the HISS (Route A). Route A is illustrated in Figure 2-5.
The photographic information examined shows evidence of wear consistent with heavy tmck
hauling on Eva, Frost and Latty avenues during the period consistent with the 1966 and 1967
haulmg activities between the SLAPS and the HISS. It seems likely that the greatest potential
for impacts would have occurred along the route described above. Reports from eyewitnesses to
the hauling activities indicate that the tmcks did use this route, except during periods of wet
weather.
When the hauling activities did not use Route A, because of weather-related effects on the
hauling roads, train traffic blocking the Frost Avenue crossing, or some other reason, other
possible routes might have included those listed below. Since Eva Avenue and part of Frost
Avenue were unimproved dirt roads at that time, they may not have been passable in times of
prolonged wet weatiier.
• Route B – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Pershall
Road, Pershall Road to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue. This route
is illustrated in Figure 2-6.
• Route C – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Pershall
Road, Pershall Road to Graham Road, Graham Road to Latty Avenue. This route is
illusfrated in Figure 2-7.
• Route D – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to 1-270,
1-270 to Graham Road, Graham Road to Latty Avenue. This route is illustrated in
Figure 2-8.
• Route E – McDonnell Boulevard to Airport Road, Airport Road to Graham Road, Graham
Road to Frost Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue. This route is illustrated in
Figure 2-9.
• Route F – McDonnell Boulevard to Airport Road, Airport Road to Graham Road, Graham
Road to Latty Avenue. This route is illusfrated in Figure 2-10.
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1-270 r
[
/ • ^ PERSHALL RDAD-
|ui
HAZEL VDDD
AVE.
LATTY AVE.
LATTY
AVE.
LINDBERGH BLVD.
MCDONNELL BLVD.

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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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2.5.1 Evaluation of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS
It is the conclusion of this report that Route A would have been the most heavily used route. If
Route A were not available, then Route B would be the next most reasonable route. Routes E
and F were also reasonable routes; however, there are constmction plans, completed in July
1966, for a major reconstmction of Airport Road. It is our judgment that this work would have
been placed out for bid in 1966 or 1967, making it likely that Airport Road was vmder
constmction when the SLAPS to the HISS haulage activities occurred. Residue hauling could
have used Airport Road before constmction started, during the Airport Road reconstmction, or
after constmction was finished. However, this use would be considered less likely than the use
of Route B. Routes C and D cannot be mled out but appear to offer no advantage over shorter
routes. Impacts have been found on Latty Avenue east of Hazelwood Avenue. For such impacts
to have occurred some haulage would have had to use Routes C or F. Table 2-1 compares routes
A through F.
Table 2-1 Comparison of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS
ROUTE
Route A
Route B
Route C
Route D
Route E
Route F
LENGTH
2.15 miles
3.60 miles
4.33 miles
4.38 miles
3.28 miles
3.44 miles
COMMENTS
Most direct route
A reasonable route
No known advantage over shorter routes.
No known advantage over shorter routes.
A reasonable route. However, Airport Road believed to be under construction 1966 to
1967.
A reasonable route. However, Airport Road believed to be under construction 1966 to
1967
2.5.2 Methods for Transporting Residues Between the SLAPS and the HISS
According to an August 15, 1967 memo titied Historical Review ofthe Mallinckrodt Airport
Cake, beUeved to be from the Congress of the United States, House of Representatives,
Committee for Public Works and Transportation, Science and Technology, the residues were
moved from the SLAPS to the HISS by Continental Mining and Milling of Chicago, Illinois.
This move required ten dump tmcks for five months and cost Continental $100,000.
In a bid dated December 27, 1965, from Braun Excavating Company (Braun) to Contemporary
and Continental, Braun made the following statement:
The unit price quoted includes loading of material into tmcks at the existing stockpile
area, transporting same to the new stockpile area, unloading and stockpiling. We
anticipate washing down the tmck wheels before entering the pubhc road, utilizing the
existing wash facilities at the BroAvn Road location. We fiirther anticipate the necessity
of keeping a bulldozer and operator at the General Electric plant site to stockpile the
material as it is dumped, and the second washing down of the tmck wheels before again
entering the road.
Items which we have not included in our Per Ton price quotation, and which are to be
bome by other, are as follows:
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a. Tmck washing facilities at both present and future stockpile areas.
b. Water used for washing tmcks.
c. Additional hazard insurance coverage over and above our present
standard workman’s compensation, and comprehensive liabihty
coverage.
d. Required periodic medical examinations, special wearing apparel, etc.,
for employees.
e. Weighting facilities for tmcks at either location, and wages for scale
man.
f. Any special material, such as wax paper, oil, sand, etc., required to
facilitate dumping of material from tmcks.
g. Facilities to be used by employees for washing, showering, and changing
of apparel.
It is likely that the acmal haulmg activities in 1966 and 1967 were conducted using methods
similar to the above. The residue would have been carried in over-the-road dump tracks.
Loading of the tracks would have been by portable conveyor system or front-end loader. Either
method would have produced dust.
Braun’s bid price for this work was $1.25 per ton. The confractor who actually performed this
work m 1967 for Continental was paid $100,000, which would be approximately $0.85 per ton.
It is believed that the tracks used would have been 20-ton dump tracks, similar to the one shown
in Illusfration 2.1; however, no documented evidence conceming the acmal type of equipment
used, other than that the equipment used for transport was “dump tracks”, has been located to
date.
An indication ofthe level of dust control expected in this work in the mid-1960s comes from a
United States Memorandum dated July 25, 1967, entitled Requirements for Surface Cleanup of
the Airport Site, which states
…the following should be considered the general plan for decontamination, which the
Airport Commission will be required to follow. It is noted that none of the clean-up
operations are of such nature to require film badging or protective precautions other than
ordinary personal hygiene practices. All tmcking operations shall be conducted in a
manner to assure minimum dusting. This can be easily accomphshed by wetting down
tmckloads prior to departure.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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Illustration 2.1
^ ^ 1 Si
* ” .:
am*
m
: • • • ‘ ^ ^ ^ v r #]
p – ^ . . :•%, –
•”**~~’»s««^’gg;’-_-.~-yt^’
JlfiilraiTi^rieweg Photo >-
&.1
. . . . . . . -‘t
-‘i:-‘*., .-A. Y*
.„!» a., t – ‘ -^ ri
…… viTJ- ^’H
l\?s l ^ ‘ * M * i p J i i ^ ~
“¥’ ;-•: •
J
1 , i
” J ‘
^ V ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H
. . ‘ . . • • ‘
– – * – ‘ . – * • » • ‘ , ‘ . ^.
Typical 1960 20-Ton Over-the-Road Dump Truck
The information available indicates that the hauling of materials from the SLAPS to the HISS
required 10 dump trucks for a period of five months. A typical 1960 era 20-ton dump tmck is
shown in Illustration 2.1 above. This type of truck has a bed capacity of 12 cubic yards. Dry
loose earth has a typical weight of 2,000 pounds per cubic yard. Heavy wet mud has a typical
weight of 3,000 pounds per cubic yard. Assuming a weight for the residue of 2,500 pounds and
that each truck was loaded with 12 yards of material would mean that each tmck load would
carry about 15 tons of material. The trucks would need to be heaped to carry the 20 tons
capacity. It is common practice for each truck to carry the maximum possible load. If the
material were heaped it would increase the chance of dusting and spillage from the truck bed. To
move the 120,000 tons of residue would have required between 6,000 and 8,000 trips.
2.5.3 Conclusions
The primary means of transport of residue between the SLAPS and the HISS was by means of
dump trucks. The most probable route for transport of residues between the SLAPS and the
HISS was Route A, from the SLAPs to McDonnell Boulevard to Eva Avenue, Eva Avenue to
Frost Avenue to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue as shown in Figure 2-
5. However, Routes B, E, and F, as shown in Figures 2-6, 2-9 and 2-10, were also used. These
routes appear to have offered the quickest and most economical routes between the SLAPS and
the HISS in 1966 and 1967.
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McDonnell Boulevard must have been used as a haul route. McDonnell Boulevard is the only
road access to the SLAPS.
Lindbergh Boulevard must have been used as a haul route, since impacts have been fotmd on
McDonnell Boulevard west of Coldwater Creek. The impacted areas on McDonnell Boulevard
cannot be explained by wind or stormwater action. The impacts must be the result of haulage
activities. Lindbergh Boulevard has tmdergone extensive widening and reconstmctions since
that time and any impacts to the shoulders in 1967 or earlier would now be under pavement.
Graham Road must also have been used as a haul road, since impacts have been fotmd along
portions of Latty Avenue east of Hazelwood Avenue. The impacted areas on Latty Avenue east
of Hazelwood Avenue cannot be explained by wind or stormwater action and must be the result
of haulage activities. This haulage activity must have occmred as part ofthe 1966 and 1967
haulage of residues from the SLAPS to the HISS. There are two possible routes from the SLAPS
to the HISS involving Graham Road. One route would have entered Graham Road from 1-270 or
Pershall Road and proceeded south on Graham Road. This portion on Graham Road has been
obliterated and been totally reconstmcted as the much wider North Hanley Road. Any impacts
to the shoulders of Graham Road in 1967, where it has been replaced with North Hanley Road,
would now be imder the North Hanley Road pavement.
The second route would use Graham Road by way of Airport Road and proceed north on
Graham Road. Airport Road was tmdergoing reconstmction in 1966 and 1967 and would have
likely been an tmdesirable haul route because of the constmction-related delays likely to be
encoimtered in the use ofthis route. A portion ofthe pre-North Hanley/Graham Road pavement
is still m existence. The portion in existence also contains the location of a former raihoad
crossmg ofthe Norfolk Southem mainline.
2.6 RESEARCH SUMMARY
Documents were obtained and reviewed from a number of sources. Among the records reviewed
were aerial photographs, constmction plans, road maintenance records, county tax records,
highway maps. United States Geological Survey (USGS) quad maps, and historical documents.
One key document was a 1992 United States Envirormiental Protection Agency (EPA)
Region VII smdy entitled Aerial Photographic Analysis of the St. Louis Airport Study Area,
Hazelwood, Missouri. This document contains a collection of aerial photographs from the years
1941, 1953, 1965, 1971, 1974, 1980, 1984, 1985, and 1990 showing tiie HISS and tiie SLAPS
and some ofthe surrounding roads. Each photograph is accompanied by an analysis ofthe work
being done on or around the sites at each particular time. These photographs of the sites were
indispensable in determining what had occurred on the roads over time. While these
photographs provide excellent coverage ofthe roads immediately adjacent to the SLAPS and the
HISS, they do not always extend far enough to cover Route 67 (aka Lindbergh Boulevard),
Airport Road, North Hanley Road, or 1-270. In addition, the scale of the photographs is very
large, with 1 inch equal to 1,000 feet and 1 inch equal to 2,000 feet being the most common.
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This large scale made it difficuh to determine with certainty the condition and type of the road
surface.
Additional aerial photographs were obtained from St. Louis County. These aerial photographs
were 1 inch equal to 200 feet or 1 mch equal to 400 feet in scale. St. Louis Coimty has aerial
photographs available from 1966, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1993, 1995, and 1997. The 1966 (1 inch
equal to 200 feet) and 1997 (1 inch equal to 400 feet) photographs were copied and reviewed for
the purposes of this report. The other photographs were from periods in which other coverage
was available or covered times of lesser interest and, therefore, were not purchased for review.
Aerial photographs were also obtained in electronic form from Surdex Corporation, a St. Louisbased
aerial photogrammetry firm. These photographs were from 1965, 1971, 1973, 1975, and
1997. The figures included in the appendices use the 1997 aerial photographs as background and
also show the outiine ofthe pavement from the 1965 photographs.
All of these aerial photographs were used to determine what generally occurred on the roadways
over time. The interpretation of this type of information is, by necessity, subjective. The
photographic data available for review is hsted m Table 2-2.
Constmction plans and maintenance records provide more objective and detailed information to
supplement the interpretation of the aerial photographs. The dates available are from the fiscal
year m which the projects were fimded for constmction, and those are the dates used in this
report. The actual date of constmction might be as many as several years later. The infomiation
from the constmction and maintenance records was used in preference to the aerial photographs
wherever possible; however, for some ofthe roads, the aerial photographs were the only records
available. Those aerial photographs available are listed in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available
YEAR
1941
1953
1958
1965
1965
1966
1971
1971
1973
1974
1975
1980
SCALE
1:11000
1:20,350
1:10,895
CADD
1:11,110
1:2400
1:10,825
CADD
CADD
1:12,115
CADD
1:7,777
USED
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
SOURCE
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Coiporation
1992 EPA Study
St. Louis County
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Corporation
Surdex Corporation
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Corporation
1992 EPA Study
COMMENTS
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Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available (Cont’d)
YEAR
1981
1984
1985
1985
1990
1993
1995
1997
1997
SCALE
1:4800
1:6,060
1:8,290
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
CADD
USED
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
SOURCE
St. Louis County
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
Surdex Corporation
COMMENTS
Color Photograph
Believed same as Surdex CADD below
For those roadways that are part ofthe state of Missouri highway system (e.g., 1-170, 1-270,
(1-270 includes Dimn Road as the north outer road and Pershall Road as the south outer road),
Lindbergh Boulevard (State Route 67), and McDonnell Boulevard (State Route TT), a key
resource was the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) pavement history drawings.
These drawings show the project year and type of road surface constmcted. Equally important,
they provide the constmction project number, which is the key to MoDOT’s microfilm system of
the old constmction plans for those highways. Only selected constmction plans were obtained
for this report, but should a greater level of detail be desired in the fiiture, additional plans are
available.
The pavement history drawings obtained from MoDOT were as follows:
096 St. Louis Sheet 8 of 31 covermg 1-170
096 St. Louis Sheet 11 of 31 covering Lindbergh Boulevard (State Route 67)
096 St. Louis Sheet 20 of 31 covermg 1-270
096 St. Louis Sheet 25 of 31 covering McDonnell Boulevard (State Route TT)
Selected highway constmction plans were obtained for portions of 1-170, Lindbergh Boulevard,
1-270, Pershall Road, and McDonnell Boulevard. Additional details of the plans reviewed are
provided in the appendices with the associated roads. These plans were also used to help
determine the ROW widths and whether fill was placed on impacted material.
Selected St. Louis County Land Information Services maps were also obtained. These
computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) drawings are at a 1-inch equal to 400 feet scale and
show street and road ROWs and property boundaries of all parcels. They also list the St. Louis
County Locator Number for each parcel. With the locator number, the owner of record, last
recorded deed, zoning, and other information can be obtained from the St. Louis County Web
site. The reliability ofthe information from the county tax assessor’s office, however, must be
considered low. The assessor’s office makes no warranty as to its accuracy, and the quality
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assurance of the input of this mformation is poor. For certainty in property boundary-line
location, a registered land surveyor, using the latest property boundary description of record,
surveyed property monument locations, and the historical chain of title for that parcel, should
locate boundary and ROW lines in the field. The maps obtained were Map Panels 9-K, 9-L,
10-K, 10-L,11-K, and 11-L.
In addition, selected tax assessor’s maps were obtained. These hand-drawn and hand-updated
drawings are at various scales, with 1 mch equal to 150 feet being the most common. These
drawings have the dimensions ofthe property boundary lines, acreages, coimty location number,
record owner, existmg buildings and pavements, and recording information of deeds or plats.
The quality assurance of these records is also poor, but they do provide some additional
information. These linens are quite old, and some times provide a historical record of what
might have occurred on a parcel over time. These drawings certainly predate any work at the
SLAPS or the HISS. The panels obtained were Map Numbers Ferguson-Florissant R-2 6, 7 and
Hazelwood 237,238, 245,247b, 249,250.
Historical highway maps were obtained from the COE. The maps obtained were dated 1952,
1965, and 1976.
Historical mapping from the USGS reviewed included the maps hsted below. Figure 2-11 shows
the six USGS quadrants of primary interest.
29
w:Vremedial designVroad researchVnc road study – fmalVfinal pavement report l-7-05.doc Final

1/7/2005
North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
Clayton Quad Map
1941 (photographed 1933)
1941
1954
1954 (photograph revised 1968)
1954 (photograph revised 1968 and 1974)
Columbia Bottoms Quad Map
1935 (photographed 1924)
1941 (pubhshed 1952) ‘
1941 (pubhshed 1959)
Granite City Quad Map
1940 (photographed 1933)
1950 (photographed 1949)
1956
1954 (photographed 1952; published 1958)
1954 (photographed 1952; pubhshed 1966)
St. Charles Quad Map
1933 (photographed 1927)
1947 (photographed 1927; revised 1946)
1955 (revised 1946).
1960 (photographed 1952)
1969 (photographed 1952; revised 1968)
1975 (photographed 1968)
1986 (photographed 1974)
roll 079, frame 321
roll 079, frame 322
roll 229, frame 075
roll 079, frame 319
roll 079, frame 318
roll 079, fi^me 364
roll 079, frame 363
roll 079, frame 361
roll 059, fi-ame 216
roll 059, frame 214
roll 059, fiame 213
roll 059, frame 212
roll 059, frame 211
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 229,
roll 229,
frame 178
firame 177
frame 176
fiame 175
frame 169
frame 378
fiame 377
Creve Coeur Quad Map
1940 (photographed 1933)
1956 (photographed 1933; revised 1954)
1959 (photographed 1952)
1966 (photographed 1952; revised 1965)
1969 (photographed 1968)
1976 (photographed 1974)
roll 079, frame 385
roll 079, frame 386
roll 079, frame 383
roll 082, frame 175
roll082, fi:amel69
roll 229, frame 378
31
w:Vremedial designVroad researchVnc road study – finalVfinal pavement report l-7-05.doc Final
1/7/2005
North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
Florissant Quad Map
1954 (photographed 1952) roll 080, frame 053
1966 ^photographed 1952; revised 1954) roll 080, frame 052
1968 (photographed 1968) roll 080, frame 051
1975 (photographed 1974) roll 229, fiame 134
1982 (photographed 1979) roll 385, frame 041
Many documents were reviewed during the preparation ofthis report. Those documents found to
be most pertinent are hsted in Appendix A.15.
32
w:Vremedial designVroad researchVnc road study – fmalVfmal pavement report 1 -7-05.doc Final
1/7/2005
North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
3.0 SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY ROADS
3.1 SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF HISTORICAL TESTING
Testing has identified impacted material adjoining several suspected haul roads. This testing has
also found evidence of impacts believed to be associated with erosion of the SLAPS and
flooding of Coldwater Creek and also with wind and storm water erosion. Based on the results
of all scanning information report

Post

1988-10-25 – MDNR – West Lake Landfill – Letter to EPA requesting determination of Hazard Ranking Score

_. vfv . < • • » . . . • . ,,;;, • . i. i .• /: tfd JOHNASHCROFT \y(li*Ir>
DuiMcin ol I mironnu-m.il Otulii
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FREDERICK A. BRL’NNKR “”X” “”VM-m ,» M.in^-tm-m x-rvuvi)
irix.t,,r STATI: (>i MI>S(>riu nm>i,,n ,,f |.arkv R^…^,,,,.
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES “” “1N”W”””Jllim
Di\’isioN OF I:NVIRONMI;NTAL gi’Ai.nv
I’.O. Box 176
Jefferson City. MOdSI()2
October 25, 1988
Mr. David Wagoner, Director
Waste Management Division
U.S. EPA Region VII
726 Minnesota Avenue
Kansas City, KS 66101
Dear Mr. Wagoner:
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Conmission (NRC) staff recently released
a report (NUREG-1308, June, 1988) on the radioactive wastes at the
Westlake Landfill in St. Louis County, Missouri.
In the report the NRC staff concludes that “(1) measures must be
taken to establish adequate permanent control of the radioactive
waste and to mitigate the potential long term impacts from its
existing storage conditions and (2) the information developed is
inadequate for a determination of several important issues, i.e.,
whether mixed wastes are involved, and whether on-site disposal is
practical technologically, and, if so, under what alternative
methods.” However, the report does not indicate whether the NRC will
take any further action at the site and informal communication with
the NRC staff indicates that NRC does not intend to take further
action.
The suggestion has been made by a number of state and local officials
and citizen’s groups that the U.S. Department of Energy should
undertake action at the site under the Formerly Utilized Sites
Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). However, a letter from DOE was
received by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources on
October 30, 1987 which states that [‘the DOE has reviewed the
possibility of the Westlake Landfill being designated as a FUSRAP
site and has concluded, based on the criteria used to designate
FUSRAP sites, that the Westlake Landfill is not eligible for
consideration as a FUSRAP site. The radioactive waste was under
Nuclear Regulatory Commission license when it was brought to the
landfill and, consistent with current DOE policy, would not be
disposed of at a DOE site.”
Mr. David Wagoner
October 25, 1988
Page 2
Since no further activity is planned at the site by either the NRC or
the DOE, I request that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) determine the Hazard Ranking Score (HRS) for this site and, if
appropriate, place the site on the National Priorities List (NPL).
This ranking should be conducted using all currently available
information on the site. Further, I request that EPA initiate the
Superfund process to determine potentially responsible parties and,
if necessary, initiate enforcement action to begin an appropriate
remedial action.
The Missouri Department of Natural Resources believes that the
current uncontrolled condition of the radioactive waste at the
Westlake Landfill is unacceptable and we are interested in expediting
action at this site. Please contact me if you have any questions
regarding MDNR’s position on this matter.
Sincerely,
DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
William C. Ford/Director
WCF/dbc
cc: Mr. Jim Fiore, DOE
Mr. Germain LaRoche, NRC

Post

1990-08 – Radiological characterization report for FUSRAP properties in St Louis, Missouri, Area – Vicinity Properties

07 2 0 3. 2
DOE/OR/20722-203 Volume I
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Revisi9n 1
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Formerly Ut.ilized. Sites Rem_edial ~·Action. Program (FUSRAP)
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,·-f. . -…\.· THE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, AREA

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cr:iN’.”’ ·.•..·
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August 1990
Bechtel “‘ National, Inc.

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• Revision 1
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1
RADIOLOGICAL
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FUSRAP PROPERTIES
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CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR IN THE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, AREA
VOLUME I
AUGUST 1990
Prepared for
United States Department of Energy
r
Oak Ridge Operations Office
Under Contract No. DE-ACOS-810R20722
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1 r By
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K. c. Noey
c. M. Sekula
r Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee P””
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Bechtel Job No. 14501
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
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Radiological characterization surveys were conducted on properties located in Hazelwood, Berkeley, and St. Louis, Missouri. Areas
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surveyed include the Norfolk and Western Railroad Properties: portions of Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, and r
‘. Pershall Road (the haul roads) and associated properties: Latty Avenue_ vicinity properties: portions of Coldwater Creek and its
r vicinity properties: and the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) vicinity properties.
r
! The survey~ were performed as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)r program to identify and clean up or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive contamination (exceeding current guidelines)
r
r remains from the early years of the nation’s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy.
r
These St. Louis sites have been included on the National Priorities
I List, a list of sites identified for remedial action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabilityr Act of 1980, also known as Superfund. Plans are currently under way to initiate a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for
r the St. Louis sites. The data collected from the radiological surveys discussed in this report will be incorporated into the RI r and FS processes for these sites.
Radiological surveys were conducted on Missouri FUSRAP properties for DOE from 1986 through 1989 by Bechtel National, Inc., the FUSRAP project management contractor, and its radiological subcontractor,r Thermo Analytical/Eberline. The results are presented in this report. The goal of the surveys was to identify radionuclides r present on the properties at above-guideline concentrations and to determine depths and areal limits of such radioactive
r
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contamination. This goal was achieved; however, there are some properties identified in this report for which the precise
boundaries of radioactive contamination have not yet been determined. A limited number of additional soil samples will be
r
‘. required to define the extent of contamination identified for these properties. Data collected from areas adjacent to these propertiesr have been extrapolated, both horizontally and vertically, to provide a conservative overestimate of the volume of contaminated soil r present. Additional soil samples will be collected and analyzed from these limited areas before remedial action begins. The data r’ from these additional soil samples will be provided in an addendum
)
to this characterization report.
r
l Survey results indicate that radioactive contamination is present on some of the properties in concentrations exceeding current DOE
\
r
r guidelines. In general, the contamination is shallow {i.e., confined to the top two feet of soil) and occurs in relatively low concentrations. The principal radioactive contaminant is
thorium-230, although analyses also identified elevated levels of
r
uranium-238 and radium-226.
Although thorium-230 was identified in concentrations exceedingr guidelines, there are no immediate health risks to people in the vicinity, given the current use of the properties. Thorium-230 r emits alpha radiation, which cannot penetrate the dead layer of
I
on a person’s body; therefore, there is no external exposure r hazard. Thorium-230 poses a radiological hazard only if it is

r
t ingested or inhaled. The guidelines were derived to protect a member of the general public ~ven if an individual built a house
\ over the contamination, lived there for so years, grew all his own food, ate meat f-.E-Om-cattle gra.z_i.ng__in._the___ ar_e!l, ._dr_ank__mi.l_k~-~-J!!-~ows
r
l _[.razing in the area, and drank water from the co.n.t_amina_t~..d~rea._ Because none of these pathways of exposure applies at the St. Louis FUSRAP properties, and given the nature of thorium-230, the contamination poses virtually no hazard.
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Throughout the RI/FS process, public comments will be solicited to provide an opportunity for the public to participate in the design
and implementation of the RI/FS process and, ultimately, to allow for public involvement in the selection of cleanup options. At this
r
l point, most of the field investigations necessary for the St. Louis area FUSRAP .sites have been completed. Data from these r investigations will be documented in an RI report. The FS will utilize information from the RI to develop and evaluate cleanup r alternatives and will ultimately lead to a record of decision by the
l
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DOE for implementation of the selected alternative. It is important to realize, however, that selection of a final cleanup alternative will be done as part of the RI/FS process described above. This process
r will evaluate a full range of reasonable alternatives including on-site disposal (i.e., at SLAPS) and off-site disposal. The public
r will have a continuing role in the and attendance at public meetings. r process will be provided by EPA and
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Natural Resources.
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process through review of reports Oversight of the entire RI/FS the Missouri Department of
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
r
List of Figures
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l List of Tables
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Acronyms r Abbreviations
t
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l.O Introduction
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1.1 Purpose and Objectivesr 1.2 Location and Description
1.3 History and Previous Radiological surveys
1.3.1 Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties
1.3.2 Coldwater Creek and Vicinity Properties r 1.3.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Properties
l
and SLAPS Vicinity Properties
1.3.4 Haul Roadsr References for Section 1.0
r 2.0 Study Area Investigation
r
2.1 Grid System
2.2 Radiological surveys
2.2.1 Methods
2.2.2 Sample Collection and Analysis

2.3 Characterization Results
r 2.4 Background Measurements Reference for Section 2.0
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3.0 Characterization Results for the Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties
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3.1 Property 1 r 3.2 Property 2
3.3 Property 3 r 3.4 Property 4
3.5 Property 5
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3.6 Property 6
r vi
xi xxv xxvi xxvii
1-1
1-1 1-3 1-13 1-16 1-17
1-18 1-18 1-19
2-1
2-1
2-5 2-5 2-10 2-12
2-14 2-17
3-1
3-1 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4
r

TABLE OF CONTENTS {continued}
r 4.0 Characterization Results for the Norfolk and Western
Railroad Properties
r
l
4.1 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent
to 9200 Latty Avenue r 4.2 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent
l
to Hanley Road r 4.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS
l ( 4.4 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek
r 4.5 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacentl to Hazelwood Avenue and South of Latty Avenue
4.6 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacentr to Hazelwood Avenue and North of Latty Avenue
4.7 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue
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5.0 Characterization Results for the Haul Roads and Associated Properties
5.1 Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwoodr Avenue, and Pershall Road
5.2 Property 1
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5.3
Property 2

5.4 Property 3

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5.5
Property 4 5.6 Property 5

5.7 Property 6
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5.8 Property 7
5.9 Property 8
5.10 Property 9
5.11 Property 10
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5.12
Property 11

5.13 Property 12

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5.14
Property 13

4-1
4-1
4-2 4-3.
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-5
5-1
5-2 5-5 5-6 5-6 5-6 5-6 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-8 5-8 5-9
vii
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TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued}
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l Page
r 5.15 Property 14 5-9
5.16 Property 14A 5-10r 5.17 Property 15 5-10
5.18 Property 16 5-11 F-5.19 Property 17 5-11
1
5.20 Property 18 5-11
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5.21 Property 19 5-12
5.22 Property 20 5-12
5.23 Property 20A 5-12r 5.24 Property 21 5-13
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5.25 Property 22 5-13 \. 5.26 Property 23 5-13
5.27 Property 24 5-13
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5.28 Property 25 5-14
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5.29 Property 26 5-14 5.30 Property 27 5-14
5.31 Property 28 5-15
5.32 Property 29 5-15r 5.33 Property 30 5-15
5.34 Property 31 5-15
.~
I 5.35 Property 31A 5-16
5.36 Property 32 5-16 r 5.37 Property 33 5-16
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5.38 Property 34 5-17
5.39 Property 35 5-17
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5.40 Property 37 5-18
5.41 Property 38 5-19r 5.42 Property 39 5-21
5.43 Property 40 5-22 r 5.44 Property 41 5-22
5.45 Property 42 5-22
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5.46 Property 43 5-22
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viii
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TABLE OF CONTENTS {continued)
r
l 5.47 Property 44
5.48 Property 45 r 5.49 Property 46
5.50 Property 47
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5.51
Property 48

5.52 Property 48A

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5.53
Property 49

5.54 Property so

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5.55
Property 51

5.56 Property 52
5.57 Property 53
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i 5.58 Property 54
5.59 Property 55
r 5.60 Property 56 5.61 Property 57 r 5.62 Property 58
I
5.63 ·Property 59
5.64 Property 60r 5.65 Property 61
5.66 Property 62 r L 5.67 Property 63
5.68 Property 63A r Reference for Section 5.0
{
6.0 Characterization Resultsr Associated Properties
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6.1 Coldwater Creek
i
6.2 Property 1
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6.3 Property 2
6.4 Property 3
,.
6.5 Property 4
~
t
6.6 Property 5
Page
5-23 5-23 5-23 5-24 5-24 5-24 5-25 5-25 5-25 5-25 5-26 5-26 5-26 5-26 5-27 5-27 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-29 5-30
for Coldwater Creek and 6-1
6-1 6-3 6-3 6-4 6-4
6-5
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ix
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TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
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6.7 Property 6
6.8 Property 7
6.9 Property 8
6.10 Property 9
6.11 Property 10
7.0 Characterization Results Adjacent to SLAPS
7.1 Banshee Road
for the Vicinity Properties
7.2 Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS
7.3 St. Louis Airport Authority Property
7.4 Ball Field Area
6-5 6-6 6-6 6-7 6-7
7-1
7-1 7-2 7-2 7-3
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LIST OF FIGURES
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Figure Title
r 1-1 Locations of FUSRAP Properties in the St. Louis, 1-2 I Missouri, Area
1-2 Locations of the Latty Avenue Properties and 1-4r SLAPS
1-3 Locations of the Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties 1-6
r 1-4 Locations of the Haul Roads Surveyed by BNI for DOE 1-7
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1-5 Locations of the Haul Roads Vicinity Properties 1-9
i
1-6 Locations of the SLAPS Vicinity Properties 1-12
r 1-7 Locations of the Coldwater Creek Vicinity Properties 1-15
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2-1 survey Grid for the Vicinity Properties Adjacent to Latty Avenue 2-2 \
2-2 survey Grid for the Haul Roads and Associated Vicinity Properties 2-3
r
2-3 survey Grid for the SLAPS Vicinity Properties 2-4
r 2-4 survey Grid for Coldwater Creek 2-6
r 2-5 Gamma Exposure Rate Measurement Locations at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to HISS 2-8
2-6 Gamma Exposure Rate Measurement Locations atr SLAPS and Vicinity Properties 2-9
r
2-7 Background Sample and Measurement Locations in the St. Louis Area 2-15
r
3-1 surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 1 on Latty Avenue 3-6
3-2 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 1 on Latty Avenue 3-7
r
I 3-3 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at
Property 1 on Latty Avenue 3-8

r 3-4 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-9
3-S Subsurface Soil sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-10
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xi
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Figure
3-6

3-7 3-8
3-9 3-10 3-11 3-12 3-13 3-14 3-15 3-16
3-17
4-1
4-2
4-3
LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Title Page
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-11
Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-12
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-13
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-14
Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-15
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-16
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-17
Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 5 on Latty Avenue 3-18
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 5 on Latty Avenue 3-19
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 5 on Latty Avenue 3-20
Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 6 on Seeger Industrial Drive 3-21
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 6 on Seeger Industrial Drive 3-22
surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-7
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-8
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-9
xii
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LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Title Page
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< r r r l r I r 4-4 4-5 4-6 4-7 4-8 4-9 4-10 4-11 4-12 4-13 4-14 4-15 S-1 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hanley Road 4-10 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hanley Road 4-11 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-12 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-14 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-1~ Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek 4-18 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek 4-19 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and South of Latty Avenue 4-20 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and South of Latty Avenue 4-21 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and North of Latty Avenue 4-22 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue 4-23 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue 4-24 surface Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Latty Avenue 5-31 xiii r r f!PI I l r r l r r '· r r ., r r ( r r r r r r Figure 5-2 5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6 5-7 5-8 5-9 5-10 5-11 5-12 5-13 5-14 5-15 5-16 5-17 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Latty Avenue 5-33 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Latty Avenue S-35 Composite Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-37 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-39 Subsurface Soil sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-41 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at McDonnell Boulevard 5-43 Composite Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue S-45 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue 5-47 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue 5-49 Areas and Depths of Radioactive contamination at Hazelwood Avenue 5-51 Composite Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Pershall Road 5-53 surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Pershall Road 5-55 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Pershall Road 5-58 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Pershall Road 5-60 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 2 5-62 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 3 5-63 xiv r I l rm I ~ I i r I r r ! r 1 F1"' i '· r l r-' I I r r Figure 5-18 5-19 5-20 5-21 5-22 5-23 5-24 5-25 5-26 5-27 5-28 5-29 5-30 5-31 LIST OF FIGURES (continued} Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 4 Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 5 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 5 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 6 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 7 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 7 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 8 Soil· Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 9 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 9 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 10 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 10 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 11 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 11 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 12 xv 5-64 5-65 5-66 5-67 5-68 5-69 5-70 5-71 5-72 5-73 5-74 5-75 5-76 5-77 r r r r r r t i I r I r rm" I l i \ r ! i I Figure 5-32 5-33 5-34 5-35 5-36 5-37 5-38 5-39 5-40 5-41 5-42 5-43 5-44 5-45 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 13 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14A Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 15 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 15 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 16 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 16 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 17 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 19 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 19 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 20 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 20 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 20A xvi Page 5-78 5-79 5-80 5-81 5-8~ 5-84 5-85 5-86 5-87 5-88 5-89 5-90 5-91 5-92 r i' r r r r r r ' r r r t r Figure 5-46 5-47 5-48 5-49 5-50 5-51 5-52 5-53 5-54 5-55 5-56 5-57 5-58 5-59 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 21 5-93 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 21 5-94 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 22 5-95 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 22 5-96 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 23 5-97 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 23 5-98 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 24 5-99 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 24 5-100 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 25 5-101 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 26 5-102 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 26 5-103 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 27 5-104 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 27 5-105 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 28 5-106 xvii r r r r r r ~ t ( ,i I r i r r r r r i r l Figure 5-60 5-61 5-62 5-63 5-64 5-65 5-66 5-67 5-68 5-69 5-70 5-71 5-72 5-73 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 29 5-107 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 30 5-108 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 30 5-109 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 31 5-110 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 31A 5-111 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 32 5-112 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 32 5-113 Soil· Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 33 5-114 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 33 5-115 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 34 5-116 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 34 5-117 surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1988 Radiological Characterization of Haul.Roads Vicinity Property 35 5-118 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1988 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35 5-119 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35 5-120 xviii r r rm I ( r r r r r r r l r r r I I Figure 5-74 5-75 5-76 5-77 5-78 5-79 5-80 5-81 5-82 5-83 5-84 5-85 5-86 5-87 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 40 xix 5-121 5-122 5-123 5-124 5-125 5-126 5-127 5-128 5-129 5-130 5-131 5-132 5-133 5-134 r. 1. r r r ! r r \ r F'1 l r F"1 ( ; I r I r r r \ i i r Figure 5-88 5-89 5-90 5-91 5-92 5-93 5-94 5-95 5-96 5-97 5-98 5-99 5-100 S-101 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 40 5-135 Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 41 5-136 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 41 5-137 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 42 5-138 Areas and Depths of Radioactive contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 42 5-139 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 43 5-140 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 43 5-141 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 44 S-142 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 44 5-143 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 45 5-144 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 45 5-145 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 46 5-146 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 47 5-147 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 47 S-148 rm i xx r I I r pm! \ I r I r r ! r r r j1 I r r r r r r Figure S-102 S-103 S-104 S-lOS S-106 S-107 5-108 S-109 S-110 S-111 S-112 S-113 S-114 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 48 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 48 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 48A Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 49 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 50 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property Sl Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property S2 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property S3 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property S3 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property S4 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property SS Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property S6 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property S7 xxi S-149 5-150 S-lSl S-1S2 S-1S3 5-1S4 S-lSS S-1S6 S-1S7 S-lSa S-1S9 S-160 S-161 ('!11!!1 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) r Figure Title 5-115 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 58 5-116 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination atr Haul Roads Vicinity Property 58 5-117 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 59 5-118 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological r Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity I Property 60 5-119 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 61 r 5-120 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 62 r. ! I 5-121 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity r Property 63 I 5-122 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity i i Property 63A 6-1 Surface Sediment Sampling Locations for 1986r Radiological Characterization of Coldwater Creek 6-2 Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 rm' I :Radiological Characterization of Coldwater Creek I 6-3 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of 1.5 Miles of Coldwater Creek r North of Pershall Road 6-4 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological ,~ Characterization of Property 1 on Coldwater Creek l r 6-5 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 2 on Coldwater Creek 6-6 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 2 on Coldwater Creek r I 5-162 5-163 5-164 5-165 5-166 5-167 5-168 5-169 6-9 6-11 6-13 6-15 6-16 6-17 xxii r r" r ! P'" ! l l r rm I r r I F" l r r r r l rm' I I r r. 1 ., r I ! Figure 6-7 6-8 6-9 6-10 6-11 6-12 6-13 6-14 7-1 7-2 7-.3 7-4 7-5 7-6 7-7 7-8 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Title Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 4 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Location for Radiological Characterization of Property 5 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 6 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 7 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 8 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Location for Radiological Characterization of Property 9 on Coldwater Creek Soil Sampling Location for Radiological Characterization of Property 10 on Coldwater Creek Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Banshee Road Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Banshee Road Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contaminati9n at Banshee Road Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the St. Louis Airport Authority Property Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the St. Louis Airport Authority Property xxiii 6-18 6-19 6-20 6-21 6-22 6-23 6-24 6-25 7-6 7-8 7-10 7-12 7-14 7-16 7-18 7-20 ~ \ Figure I I 7-9 r 7-10 r 7-11 rm I I 7-12 ~ l 1 i ! rm r i 1 r r r I r r 1 ,... I LIST OF FIGURES {continued) Title Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the St. Louis Airport Authority Property Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ball Field Area Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ball Field Area Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Ball Field Area 7-22 7-24 7-25 7-26 xxiv r r. LIST OF TABLES r Table Title Page 1-1 Tax Map Ref eren~e List for Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties 1-2 Tax Map Reference List for Haul Roads Vicinity Properties 1-3 Tax Map Reference List for Coldwater Creek Vicinity Properties r 2-1 Summary of Residual Contamination Guidelines for FUSRAP Properties in the St. Louis, Missouri, Area 2-2 Background Radionuclide Concentrations in Soil and Radiation Levels in the St. Louis Area r r r. \ NOTE: TABLES ! VOLUME THROUGH r I 1 pq I r r'1' I. [ j ) r 3-1 THROUGH 5-7 ARE CONTAINED IN II OF THIS REPORT. TABLES 5-8 7-8 ARE CONTAINED IN VOLUME III. xxv r 1-5 1-10 1-14 2-13 2-16 r ACRONYMS r r J r i r r r. 1 i r I I r i J \ AEC BNI CERCLA DOE FUSRAP HISS MED NRC NEPA ORAU ORNL PIC PMC SLAPS SLDS TMA/E TMC TSCL Atomic Energy Commission Bechtel National, Inc. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Hazelwood Interim Storage Site Manhattan Engineer District Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Environmental Policy Act Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge National Laboratory pressurized ionization chamber project management contractor St. Louis Airport Site St. Louis Downtown Site Thermo Analytical/Eberline Technical Measurements Center temporary slope and construction line rm j ' xxvi r r" I l ABBREVIATIONS fl"'IJ cm centimeter } 2 cm square centimeter cpm counts per minute I"""' I ft foot 1 h hour r ha hectares in. inch \!"!!ft km kilometer ' m meter 2 ~ m square meter 3 m cubic meter ,.. mi mile \ mrem millirem mrem/yr millirem per year r mR/h milliroentgens per hour µR/h microroentgens per hour ,. I pCi/g picocuries per gram l yd3 cubic yard pm yr year r r xxvii I ~ 1' r. 1 ; i 1.0 INTRODUCTION ~ l ( The cha~acterization activities reported in this document were ~ conducted as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action I Program (FUSRAP), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) effort to l~ identify and clean up or otherwise control sites where residual l radioactive contamination (exceeding current guidelines) remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that congress has mandated DOE to remedy. Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) acts as the project management contractor (PMC), responsible to DOE for planning, managing, and implementing FUSRAP. Surveys were conducted from 1986 through 1989 at DOE's direction by BNI and its radiological subcontractor, Thermo Analytical/Eberline (TMA/E). 1.1 PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES r This report describes the procedures used to conduct the 1986 through 1989 radiological characterization of FUSRAP properties in F"° the St. Louis, Missouri, area (see Figure 1-1). These properties include o Latty Avenue vicinity properties o Portions of Coldwater Creek and its vicinity properties o Norfolk and Western Railroad properties r1" j/ o St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) vicinity properties o Portions of Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, and Pershall Road (the haul roads) and associated vicinity properties i' The St. Louis sites have been placed on the National Priorities ' List, which is a list of sites identified for remediation under the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, also referred to as Superfund. r \ 1-1 lo.& I I\) FIGURE 1·1 LOCATIONS OF FUSRAP PROPERTIES IN THE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, AREA r The objective of these characterization activities is to define the horizontal and vertical boundaries of radioactive contamination exceeding DOE guidelines. The data collected from the radiological surveys discussed in this report will be incorporated into the remedial investigation and feasibility study reports for the st. Louis sites. r 1.2 LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION r. 1 SLAPS is an 8.8-ha (21.7-acre) tract located in St. Louis County, rm Missouri, approximately 24 km (15 mi) from downtown St. Louis and I immediately north of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. SLAPS is bounded by the Norfolk and Western Railroad and Banshee Road on the south, Coldwater Creek on the west, and McDonnell Boulevard and adjacent recreational fields on the north and east. Figure 1-2 shows the location of SLAPS and the Latty Avenue properties. The Latty Avenue properties [Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) on the eastern half and the Futura Coatings property on the western half] are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. These r properties cover a 4.5-ha (11-acre) tract located in the city limits of Hazelwood and are approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) northeast of the control tower of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. r Each Latty Avenue vicinity property characterized as part of the radiological survey was assigned a numerical identifier that corresponds to a St. Louis County tax map locator number. Table 1-1 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator r number. The Latty Avenue vicinity properties lie within the cities of Hazelwood and Berkeley and are shown in Figure 1-3. The haul roads, believed to have been used during waste transfer among the St. Louis properties, include Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, Pershall Road, Eva Avenue, and Frost Avenue. Characterization results from the right-of-way of these roads are reported with those of the appropriate associated vicinity i ', properties. These routes traverse Hazelwood, Berkeley, and St. Louis and are located near HISS and SLAPS as shown in Figure 1-4. pA J 1-3 I., ,.,·"·' I I • \ i '., / . i ·,, / ' ,, I . • FUSRAP SITES . I . LAMBERT·ST. LOUIS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT NOTTO SCALE ·-·-·-·-·!.... ....... ., t ~ BERKELEY Ii·-·-···. O 😀 . ,...1 ... :a ! p TO DOWNTO' ......•\ ST. LOUIS \ FIGURE 1M2 LOCATIONS OF THE LATTY AVENUE PROPERTIES AND SLAPS r ! TABLE 1-1 ~ I ) TAX MAP REFERENCE LIST FOR LATTY AVENUE VICINITY PROPERTIES Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number Property 1 10KS30098 Property 2 10KS10012 Property 3 10KS20022 Property 4 10KS20044 Property s 10KS20033 Property 6 10K510067 r l ¥fil I r ' r r I " 1• ' \ . r I l r ~ I 1-5 r i 11 I I I J(------.HISS ... g~ 1.61 1--1 I en Nl100 ·-·-·-·--·----· ,...---------------·-· ,---------------, I r-----------1 ' I I 1 'I 11 N1600 ....---11 I, I,'I N1400 PHOPERTY I '{___ I I N1100 I I I L---~~~~-----.....11""'™"""-™_..._l~-~~A_vrn_UE......._---..... "----L___l!H.fl/lli1000 I 1 I 1n I I 1LJ I PROPERTY l I PROP[RIY 4 IPROPERTY 5 I I I I I I I ~-------l I I ------1 I I D------..... _ _,__j) BUILDING r-----tJ [] IPROP[RlY 6 I PROP[RTY BOUNDARY I I I I II r () 1'--OJ~ll"8-1.-Is-T"ro§ .. "' "' ~ I !:!' ~ N ~ ~' N w w I.Al w w ,,., w w "' 0 ~ "' 0 " ., "' "' N1100 N1000 N !~ NGOO 0 ~ " ... FIGURE 1·3 LOCATIONS OF THE LAITY AVENUE VICINITY PROPERTIES S34~MSI 1.0GN I ""' ..J • • • • HAUL ROADS 0 500 1000 SCAL! IN FEET FIGURE 1·4 LOCATIONS OF THE HAUL ROADS SURVEYED BY BNI FOR DOE r In addition to these haul roads, several adjacent properties were r included as part of the radiological characterization {see Figure 1-5). Each haul road vicinity property characterized as part of the radiological survey was assigned a numerical identifier that r I corresponds to a St. Louis County tax map locator number. Table 1-2 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator r I number. I r SLAPS was acquired by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1947. From that time until approximately 1966, the site was used to store waste materials from the uranium feed materials plant at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS). Radioactive contamination of the SLAPS vicinity properties may be the result of movement of contaminated soils from SLAPS via surface runoff or transfer by vehicles. In 1973, ownership of SLAPS was transferred by quitclaim deed from AEC to the City of St. Louis. The 1985 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act (Public Law 98-360) authorized DOE to reacquire r the property from the city for use as a permanent disposal site. Actions to transfer ownership of the property to DOE have been f"ID initiated. l The SLAPS vicinity properties include Banshee Road, the area southr of Banshee Road owned by the St. Louis Airport Authority, the recreational areas to the north of SLAPS known as the ball field r '· area, and the ditches to the north and south of SLAPS. Figure 1-6 shows the locations of the SLAPS vicinity properties. 1 r t Coldwater creek, a tributary of the Missouri River, has an overall length of 30.6 km (19 mi). The creek, which originates about 5.8 km r (3.6 mi) south of SLAPS at a small spring-fed lake, flows for a distance of 152 m (500 ft) along the west side of SLAPS and r ~ischarges into the Missouri River about 22.5 km (14 mi) northeast of the site. Beneath the airport, Coldwater Creek flows in an underground drainage passage. The location of Coldwater Creek is shown in Figure 1-1. r 1. r 1-8 i I 15 FIGURE 1·5 LOCATIONS OF THE HAUL ROADS VICINITY PROPERTIES r TABLE 1-2 TAX MAP REFERENCE LIST FOR HAUL ROADS VICINITY PROPERTIES Page 1 of 2 Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number 1-10 ~I 10L220893 10L240093 10L520098 10L240082 10L330095 10L330040 10L330031 10L330022 10L330073 10L340023 10L340014 10L340032 10L310011 11K510035 State of Missouri McDonnell Boulevard Right-of-Way 11K520056 10K210064 10K210053 10K230051 10K230031 10K230040 10K210031 10K230073 10K240106 10K240094 10K330140 10K220151 10K220140 10K330030 10K330063 10K330074 10K330085 10K310111 10K330131 10K330173 10K330113 10K330122 10K610080 r re i r rm I I ra r I r r I* I r r I r I Property 1 Property 2 Property 3 Property 4 Property 5 Property 6 Property 7 Property 8 Property 9 Property 10 Property 11 Property 12 Property 13 Property 14 Property 14A Property 15 Property 16 Property 17 Property 18 Property 19 Property 20 Property 20A Property 21 Property 22 Property 23 Property 24 Property 25 Property 26 Property 27 Property 28 Property 29 Property 30 Property 31 Property 31A Property 32 Property 33 Property 34 Property 35 r. 1 ! TABLE 1-2 ,.. I {continued) Page 2 of 2 r. 1 Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number r r l r r. 1 -i r I r r r Property 37 Property 38 Property 39 Property 40 Property 41 Property 42 Property 43 Property 44 Property 45 Property 46 Property 47 Property 48 Property 48A Property 49 Property so Property Sl Property S2 Property S3 Property S4 Property SS Property S6 Property S7 Property 58 Property 59 Property 60 Property 61 Property 62 Property 63 Property 63A 10KS20066 10KS40097 10K630303 09K220140 10KS40031 09K220041 10KS40075 09K220030 09K2200S2 09K220074 09K22008S 09K220184 09K220173 09K3101S3 09K310164 09K31017S 09K322187 09K220162 09K220106 09K2100S3 09K210064 09Kl40026 09Kl40015 09Kll0304 09Kl30027 09Kl30016 09Kl30038 10K430020 State of Missouri Pershall Road Right-of-Way v. i fla I I 1-11 FIGURE 1·6 LOCATIONS OF THE SLAPS VICINITY PROPERTIES SSJW!811.0GN TABLE 1-3 TAX MAP REFERENCE LIST FOR COLDWATER CREEK VICINITY PROPERTIES Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number Property 1 09K120095 Property 2 09K120149 Property 3 09K120040 Property 4 09K120127 Property 5 09K120116 Property 6 10K440030 Property 7 10K440096 Property 8 10K440074 Property 9 10K420010 Property 10 10K140024 re I r F. l i r i r r I r. 1-13 r. \ r Each vicinity property associated with Coldwater creek was assigned r a numerical identifier that corresponds to a st. Louis county tax I map locator number. Table 1-3 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator number. Figure 1-7 shows the r \ I vicinity properties associated with Coldwater Creek. ,,,.. 1i l. 3 HISTORY AND PREVIOUS RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS In 1966, ore residues and uranium-and radium-bearing process wastes stored at SLAPS were purchased by the Continental Mining and Milling I company of Chicago, Illinois, and placed in storage at 9200 Latty ! Avenue. These wastes were generated by a St. Louis plant {currently owned by Mallinckrodt, Inc.} between 1942 and the late 1950s under contracts with AEC and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District {MED}. Some of the residues were dried in two buildings on site before being shipped to a Colorado mill. The rest were removed from 9200 Latty Avenue {currently HISS) in 1973, to terminate a r Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC) license for storage, and the i property was later sold to the current owner. At this time, barium ;' ~) r _sulfat~ residues were reportedly diluted with site soil and transported to ~t Lake LandfilJ. in St. Louis County. r r The residues stored at 9200 Latty Avenue were deposited directly on the ground. When the last residues were removed from the ground r surface, a reported 30-to 46-cm (12-to 18-in.} layer of topsoil also was removed before the property was sold. It appears that parts of the property are contaminated in excess of current guidelines as a result of mechanical earth-moving activities and water percolation {Refs. 1-1 and 1-2). The primary contaminant is thorium-230. Much of the uranium and radium in the ore had been removed during earlier processing. It is possible that McDonnell r Boulevard was the haul road used for the transport of barium sulfate residues. Pershall Road -ang_jlazelwood-Avenue -also were possible r" . --~ ' I haul roads during the transport of residues among the St. Louis i sites. The soils along the shoulders of Latty Avenue also were r surveyed and found to be contaminated, possibly as a result of residues spilling from the transport trucks. 1-14 r r l 1.3.1 Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties r In 1981, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) performed a radiological survey of the northern and eastern boundaries of HISS f l for NRC (Refs. 1-3 and 1-4). Levels of contamination, principally thorium-230, similar to those levels on the site were found in both areas. In September 1983, DOE directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a preliminary survey of properties adjacent to and in the vicinity of HISS at 9200 Latty Avenue to determine if radioactive contamination in excess of guidelines was present. The potentially contaminated areas identified during that preliminary evaluation were then more thoroughly surveyed by ORNL during January and February 1984. Results of the survey established that radioactive contamination was present over most of the HISS vicinity properties, extending north and south in some areas onto adjacent private r properties along Latty Avenue (Refs. 1-5 and 1-6). ORNL discovered r that redistribution of the contamination had occurred, probably as a result of flooding, surface runoff, and road and utility line I activities. The major contaminant found was thorium-230; radium-226 and uranium-238 were present in lesser amounts. r J Based on the ORNL characterization, DOE directed BNI to perform r r remedial action in 1984 on the contaminated areas within the temporary slope and construction line (TSCL) along Latty Avenue (Ref. 1-7). The TSCL included all areas that could have been r disturbed during a drainage improvement project being carried out by the cities of Hazelwood and Berkeley. During the remedial action, ! contamination exceeding guidelines was found to extend beyond the TSCL. r In 1986, DOE directed BNI to provide radiological support to the ~ I cities during their road improvement project. During this coverage, radium-226 and thorium-230 contamination in excess of DOE remedial r action guidelines was found at depths ranging from 0.6 to 2.4 m (2 ! to 8 ft} along and under Latty Avenue. Based on gamma count rates, i I 1-16 r I r materials contaminated in excess of remedial action guidelines were 3 removed and placed in storage at HISS. Approximately 4,206 m 3 r (4,600 yd) of material was placed in a storage pile developed specifically to accommodate these materials and covered with a I low-permeability membrane. In addition to gamma scanning the soil that was not placed in storage at HISS, gross alpha counting was r i used as a screening technique. Using gross alpha counting, soil samples were scanned for alpha-emitting radionuclides, such as thorium-230, in excess of DOE remedial action guidelines. Soils that did not exhibit contamination in excess of DOE remedial action guidelines were used as fill material on the railroad property located between the Futura Coatings site and Coldwater Creek and ~ along the entire length of Latty Avenue. \ l Radiological characterization of the Latty Avenue vicinity ! ~ properties was necessary to define the locations and boundaries of the contamination identified in the ORNL survey and to evaluate r disposal alternatives. 1 l 1.3.2 Coldwater Creek and Vicinity Properties ~ In 1982, DOE directed BNI to perform a radiological characterization r f of the ditches to the north of SLAPS and portions of Coldwater Creek (Ref. 1-8). Results of this survey indicated that gamma-emitting i r j contamination exceeding remedial action guidelines was present. This survey did not include measuring thorium-230 concentrations in soils. Subsequent analysis of additional radionuclides showed the r presence of thorium-230 in above-guideline concentrations; therefore, all later field work conducted in the St. Louis area involved analyzing for thorium-230. Characterization efforts continued in 1986 at the SLAPS ditches and involved analyzing r archived soil samples from the 1982 survey for thorium-230. The results of these analyses indicated the need to collect soil samples r beyond the area surveyed in 1982 (on the ball field) to adequately r determine the extent characterization are r r ! of contamination. Results for the ball field reported in Section 7.0 of this report. 1-17 Additionally, sediment samples were collected in 1986 from the sides J and center of Coldwater Creek beginning at SLAPS and continuing I downstream to HISS. The data from these samples indicated spotty contamination along the entire distance. r 1.3.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Propertiesr and SLAPS Vicinity Properties A radiological and limited chemical characterization was conducted at SLAPS in 1986 by BNI. Results of this survey showed contamination present on SLAPS extending to depths as great as s.s m (18 ft) (Ref 1-9). The Norfolk and Western Railroad property forms the southern boundary of SLAPS. The radiological characterization of the SLAPS vicinity properties, Banshee Road, and the railroad property was necessary to define the magnitude and boundaries of the i contamination and evaluate disposal alternatives. No formal radiological characterization had been performed on these properties ( until that of 1986-1989. ( r-1.3.4 Haul Roads l In 1985, DOE directed ORNL to perform a radiological survey of the I ~ roads thought to have been used to transport contaminated material to and from SLAPS and HISS (Ref. 1-10). Results of the ORNL gamma radiation walkover scan of the roadsides showed areas where gamma exposure rates are in excess of background radiation levels. Gamma exposure rates up to 90 µR/h were found on the surface of McDonnell Boulevard. Soil sample analysis results from the 1985 survey showed thorium-230 to be the major contaminant. As a result of thi:J r survey, parts of Hazelwood Avenue, Pershall Road, and McDonnell Boulevard were designated for remedial action in 1986. r i r r I 1-18 ! REFERENCES FOR SECTION 1.0 r 1-1 Bechtel National, Inc. Characterization Report for the r-Hazelwood Interim Storage Site, Hazelwood, Missouri, 1 I DOE/OR/20722-141, Oak Ridge, Tenn., June 1987. rm I I 1-2 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological Characterization Report for the Futura Coatings Site, Hazelwood, Missouri, r DOE/OR/20722-158, Oak Ridge, Tenn., July 1987. I r 1-3 Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Preliminary Radiological Survey of Proposed Street Right-of-Way at Futura Coatings, Inc., 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri, Oak Ridge, Tenn., December 1981. r 1-4 Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Concentrations of Radionuclides in Soil Samples from Propertv at 9150 Latty r Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri, Oak Ridge, Tenn., April 28, 1982. \' 1-5 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Radiological Survey of Latty j Avenue in· the Vicinity of the Former Cotter Site, Hazelwood/ Berkeley, Missouri CLMOOl), ORNL/TM-10006, Oak Ridge, Tenn., r ! May 1987. r r i 1-6 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Radiological Survey of Properties in the Vicinity of the Former Cotter Site, Hazelwood/Berkeley, Missouri CLM003), ORNL/TM-10008, Oak Ridge, Tenn., May 1987. r 1-7 Bechtel National, Inc. Post-Remedial Action Report for the Hazelwood Site -1984, DOE/OR/20722-76, Oak Ridge, Tenn., September 1985. r 1-8 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological Survey of the Ditches at the St. Louis Airport Site , Oak Ridge, Tenn., August r 1983.
r
I
1-19
r
j
r

1-9 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological and Limited Chemical
r
Characterization Report for the St. Louis Airport Site,
r
! St. Louis, Missouri, DOE/OR/20722-163, Oak Ridge, Tenn., August 1987.
1-10 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results of the Radiation r Measurements Taken at Transportation Routes CLM004) in Hazelwood, Missouri, ORNL/RASA-86/31, Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
December
I
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1986.

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2.0 STUDY AREA INVESTIGATION

r
The radiological characterization surveys conducted at the FUSRAP
i properties in St. Louis consisted of the following steps: \ establishing a reproducible grid system, clearing the area to be surveyed as appropriate, performing gamma radiation walkover scans
r
and near-surface gamma radiation measurements where applicable, and
collecting and analyzing surface and subsurface soil samples. The
types of radiological measurements taken and the methods used are
described in Subsections 2.2 and 2.3.
2.1 GRID S.YSTEM
A civil surveyor established a 15-m (50-ft) grid on the vicinity
properties adjacent to Latty Avenue by marking the intersections of
a series of perpendicular lines, as shown in Figure 2-1.
[Figure 2-1 is marked at 61-m (200-ft) intervals because of the size

r of the drawing.] The grid origin used during the remedial action conducted in 1984 along the Latty Avenue right-of-way was reestablished.
A 15-m (50-ft) grid was also established over the haul roads and
i
t adjacent properties, extending approximately 46-m (150 ft) from the roadways (see Figure 2-2). [Figure 2-2 is marked at 305-m (1,000-ft) intervals because of the size of the drawing.] A 15-m (50-ft) grid was established over the SLAPS vicinity properties as
rI shown in Figure 2-3. [Figure 2-3 is marked at 61-m (200-ft) intervals because of the size of the drawing.] The grid origin was r the southwest corner of SLAPS. These grids were tied to the SLAPS
I
grid system and to the Missouri state grid system with sufficient
r
detail to allow for reestablishment at a later date. When characterization work was initially performed at 9200 Latty Avenue
and SLAPS, each site was treated independently and a grid was
r established at each. At that time, it was not suspected that
contamination would be as extensive as it is in the area and that
r the two sites would be essentially continuous. This accounts for
having different grid systems for the two sites.

r
2-1
r

I\)
I

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Nl100

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l__ -_ J ~
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,\

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FIGURE 2·1 SURVEY GRID FOR THE VICINITY PROPERTIES ADJACENT TO LAITY AVENUE

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I 5, “?””” .. ~–1illl•w 22 23 24 -i3 HlOOO
~~e~~,…. ~ I ~ ~~~ “IRiill • / “‘ e IO t ~~ ( 18 1 111..;.;.i;I
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FIGURE 2-2 SURVEY GRID FOR THE HAUL ROADS AND
mr119.DGN
ASSOCIATED VICINITY PROPERTIES

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r

Minimal clearing was done along Coldwater Creek so that a traverse
I ~
line could be established with right angle offsets at 152-m {500-ft)
intervals {Figure 2-4). The traverse line was referenced back to
r the SLAPS grid. Sampling locations were determined by measuring
i J along the offset lines. All characterization data correspond to coordinates on the grids. All grids shown in the figures in this
r
document are displayed in measurement units of feet.
r
2.2 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS
I
r The characterization survey consisted of two major components: surface surveys and subsurface investigations. Surface surveys were ~ performed first to provide information about the patterns of contamination and to assist in the identification of areas in which ~ subsurface contamination could be present. The subsurface
I
investigations were performed subsequently to establish the depths of contamination in areas that the surface surveys identified as r being contaminated. An additional purpose of the subsurface investigations was to locate any subsurface contamination that
I
lacked surface manifestation.
I
r 2.2.1 Methods
i
Two types of surface survey methods were used: walkover surveys and near-surface gamma radiation surveys. Initial gamma radiation walkover scans were performed within grid blocks on the vicinity properties adjacent to Latty Avenue and SLAPS using an unshielded gamma scintillation detector. A gamma radiation walkover scan was
r
r done on accessible areas of Coldwater Creek’s banks and any associated properties. Areas in which readings exceeded twice the gamma radiation background level were marked on a site drawing.
This type of survey covers virtually all the ground surface and has
the advantage that
~
I boundaries of the precisely correct detector readings.
i
I
it can be conducted quickly; however, the areas identified as being contaminated may not be because of the effect of nearby contamination on
2-5

I\)
I
0\
1—–PROPERTY BOUNDARY I

134F 120. DCN

,..
I
Near-surface gamma radiation measurements were made 30 cm (12 in.) r above the ground surface at 3.8-m (12.5-ft) intervals in the areas
1
identified as contaminated on the basis of the gamma radiation walkover scan. This survey was performed to define more clearly the boundaries of contamination identified by the earlier walkover survey. The same kind of detector that was used during the walkover
r survey, a 5-cm by 5-cm (2-in. by 2-in.) sodium-iodide, thallium-activated [NaI(Tl)] detector, was used during this survey.
r
I The detector was mounted in a probe assembly surrounded with a
i
conical lead shield to reduce the gamma intensity through the sides, r= thus producing a downward directional response. The detector was
I
i
r
I calibrated at the Technical Measurements Center (TMC) in Grand Junction, Colorado.
It should be pointed out that neither the walkover nor the near-surface gamma radiation survey is effective for detecting the presence of thorium-230. Thorium-230 is an alpha-emitting
r
radionuclide that cannot be detected in si~u.
!
r
Gamma exposure rates at 1 m (3 ft) above the ground were measured on
the Norfoik and Western Railroad property adjacent to HISS and on the SLAPS vicinity properties to the north and south of SLAPS using
r
I
(
a pressurized ionization chamber (PIC). The PIC has a response to gamma radiation that is proportional to exposure in roentgens.
r
I Readings were made at 37 selected grid points on the Norfolk and Western Railroad property adjacent to HISS (see Figure 2-5) and at
i
i 69 locations at SLAPS and vicinity properties (see Figure 2-6). This exposure rate information will be valuable for use in remedial rm action planning, environmental monitoring, and the preparation of
!
documentation required by CERCLA/National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities.
rm
!
Subsurface investigations were conducted by drilling and/or hand.
r
l augering holes at most 30.5-m (100-ft) grid intersections. The depth to which each borehole was drilled was based on guidance from
r
r.
1
I
2-7
r-‘
r=
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f

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I

r
i
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r
I
r

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C> 00 C>
0 C>
RAILROAD 0
C>
0 C>
U) CD e ~
fP1 FENCE ‘q”‘
L&.J
w L&.J L&.J L&.J
I
r
FIGURE 2-5 GAMMA EXPOSURE RATE MEASUREMENT LOCATIONS l
AT THE NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILROAD PROPERTY ADJACENT TO HISS
i
i
I
2-8
~&C4?.MJ~
(

N I \0

~ GRB• Ctt, 141 S34*526.00H JKL
r

the geologist on site and the radiological support representative.
i
The hand-augered holes were typically 1 to 1.3 m (3 to 4 ft) deep.
1
Although gamma logging is typically used to determine the depth of
i subsurface contamination, thorium-230 (the principal contaminant)
I cannot be detected in situ; therefore, continuous soil samples were collected from the surface to the bottom of the hole by driving a split spoon sampler in advance of the auger. Deviations from this methodology required by field conditions are described in each
r
section of this report.
Downhole gamma logging was performed in each c

Post

1990-03 – Radiolgoical characterization report of FUSRAP properties in the St Louis, Missouri, Area

• –t…… ….
DOE/OR/20722-203

RECEJVFJ)
MAH ~ o;gqo RDn. SECnoH
RADIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR FUSRAP PROPERTIES IN THE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, AREA
VOLUME I
MARCH 1990
Prepared for
United State1 Department of Enerqy
Oak Ridge Operations Off ice
Under Contract No. DE-ACOS-810R20722

111111111 ~ 1~111111 ~111111111111111111111111111 Ill S00183393 SUPERFUND RECORDS
By JC. C. Noey
c. M. Sekula
Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee
Bechtel Job No. 14501

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Radioloqical characterization aurveys were conducted on properties located in Hazelwood, Berkeley, and St. Louis, Missouri. Areas surveyed include the Norfolk and Western Railroad Properties; portions of Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, and Pershall Road (the haul roads) and associated properties; Latty Avenue vicinity properties: portions of Coldwater Creek and its vicinity properties; and the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) vicinity properties.
The surveys were performed as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Proqram (FUSRAP), a U.S. Department of Enerqy (DOE)
proqram to identify and clean up or otherwise control sites where
residual radioactive contamination (exceedinq current quidelines)
remains from the early years of the nation’s atomic enerqy program or from commercial operations causinq conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy.
These St. Louis sites have been included on the National Priorities List, a list of sites identified for remedial action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, also known as Superfund. Plans are currently under way to initiate a remedial investi9ation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the St. Louis sites. The data collected from the radiological surveys discussed in this report will be incorporated into the RI and FS processes for these sites.
Radiolo9ical surveys were conducted on Missouri FUSRAP properties for DOE from 1986 through 1989 by Bechtel National, Inc., the FUSRAP project management contractor, and its radioloqical subcontractor, Thermo Analytical/Eberline. The results are presented in this report. The 9oal of the surveys was to identify radionuclide& present on the properties at above-quideline concentrations and to determine depths and areal limits of such radioactive
iii

contamination. This qoal was achieved: however, there are some properties identified in thia report for which the precise boundaries of radioactive contamination have not yet been determined. A limited number of additional soil samples will be required to define the extent of contamination identified for these properties. Data collected froa areas adjacent to these properties have been extrapolated, both horizontally and vertically, to provide a conservative overestimate of the volume of contaminated soil present. Additional soil samples will be collected and analyzed from these limited areas before remedial action beqins. The data from these additional soil samples will be provided in an addendum to this characterization report.
Survey results indicate that radioactive contamination is present on some of the properties in concentrations exceeding current DOE quidelines. In qeneral, the contamination is shallow (i.e., confined to the top two feet of soil) and occurs in relatively low concentrations. The principal radioactive contaminant is thorium-230, although analyses also identified elevated levels of uranium-238 and radium-226.
Although thorium-230 was identified in concentrations exceeding DOE quidelines, there are no immediate health risks to people in the vicinity, qiven the current use of the properties. Thorium-230 emits alpha radiation, which cannot penetrate the dead layer of skin on a person’s body: therefore, there is no external exposure hazard. Tborium-230 poses a radiological hazard only if it is
ingested or inhaled. The guidelines were derived to protect a member of the general public even if an individual built a house over the contamination, lived there for so years, qrew all his own food, ate meat from cattle qrazinq in the area, drank milk from cows grazing in the area, and drank water from the contaminated area. Because none of these pathways of exposure applies at the St. Louis FUSRAP properties, and given the nature of thorium-230, the contamination poses virtually no hazard.
iv

Throuqhout the RI/FS process, public comments will be solicited to provide an opportunity for the public to participate in the desiqn and implementation of the RI/FS process and, ultimately, to allow for public involvement in the selection of cleanup options. At this point, most of the field investigations necessary for the St. Louis area FUSRAP sites have been completed. Data from these investiqations will be documented in an RI report. The FS will utilize information from the RI to develop and evaluate cleanup alternatives and will ultimately lead to a record of decision by the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DOE for implementation of the selected alternative. It is important to realize, however, that selection of a final cleanup alternative will be done as part of the RI/FS process described above. This process will evaluate a full ranqe of reasonable alternatives including on-site disposal (i.e., at SLAPS) and off-site disposal. The public will have a continuinq role in the process throuqh review of reports and attendance at public meetings. oversiqht of the entire RI/FS process will be provided by EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.
v

TABLE OF CONTENTS

List of Fiqures List of Tables Acronyms Abbreviations
l.O Introduction
1.1 Purpose and Objectives
1.2 Location and Description
1.3 History and Previous Radioloqical surveys
1.3.1 Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties
1.3.2 Coldwater Creek and Vicinity Properties
1.3.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Properties and SLAPS Vicinity Properties
1.3.4 Haul Roads
References for Section 1.0

2.0 Study Area Investigation
2.1 Grid System
2.2 Radiological Surveys
2.2.1 Methods
2.2.2 Sample Collection and Analysis
2.3 Characterization Results
2.4 Background Measurements
Reference for Section 2.0
3.0 Characterization Result• Vicinity Properties
3.1 Property l
3.2 Property 2
3.3 Property 3
3.4 Property 4
3.5 Property 5
3.6 Property 6
for the Latty Avenue
Paqe
xi xxv xxvi xxvii
1-1
1-1 1-3 1-13 1-16 1-17
1-18 l-18 1-19
2-1
2-1
2-5
2-5
2-10
2-12
2-14
2-16
3-1
3-1 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4
vi

TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)

4.0 Characterization Results for the Norfolk and Western
Railroad Properties 4-1
4.1 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-1
4.2 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hanley Road 4-2
4.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-3
4.4 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek 4-3
4.5 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and south of Latty Avenue 4-4
4.6 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and North of Latty Avenue 4-5
4.7 Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue 4-5
5.0 Characterization Results for the Haul Roads and Associated Properties 5-1
5.1 Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, and Pershall Road 5-2
5.2 Property l 5-5
5.3 Property 2 5-6
5.4 Property 3 5-6
5.5 Property 4 5-6
5.6 Property 5 5-6
5.7 Property 6 5-7
5.8 Property 7 5-7
5.9 Property 8 5-7
5.10 Property 9 5-7
5.11 Property 10 5-8
5.12 Property 11 5-8
5.13 Property 12 5-8
5.14 Property 13 5-9
vii

TABLE OF CONTENTS

5.15 Property 14
5.16 Property 14A
5.17 Property 15
5.18 Property 16
S.19 Property 17
S.20 Property 18
5.21 Property 19
5.22 Property 20
S.23 Property 20A
S.24 Property 21
5.25 Property 22
5.26 Property 23
S.27 Property 24
S.28 Property 25
5.29 Property 26
5.30 Property 27
5.31 Property 28
5.32 Property 29
5.33 Property 30
5.34 Property 31
5.35 Property 31A
5.36 Property 32
5.37 Property 33
5.38 Property 34
S.39 Property 35
S.40 Property 37
S.41 Property 38
5.42 Property 39
S.43 Property 40
S.44 Property 41
5.45 Property 42
5.46 Property 43
(continued)
Paae
5-9 5-10 5-10 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-12 5-12 5-12 5-13 5-13 5-13 5-13 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-17 S-17 5-18 5-19 5-21 5-22 S-22 5-22 5-22
viii

TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
5.47 Property 44
5.48 Property 45
5.49 Property 46
5.50 Property 47
5.51 Property 48
5.52 Property 48A
5.53 Property 49
5.54 Property 50
5.55 Property 51
5.56 Property 52
5.57 Property 53
5.58 Property 54
5.59 Property 55
5.60 Property 56
S.61 Property 57
5.62 Property 58
S.63 Property 59
5.64 Property 60
5.65 Property 61
5.66 Property 62
S.67 Property 63
5.68 Property 63A
Reference for Section s.o

6.0 Characterization Results for Coldwater Associated Properties
6.1 Coldwater Creek
6.2 Property 1
6.3 Property 2
6.4 Property 3
6.5 Property 4
6.6 Property 5
Page
5-23 5-23 5-23 5-24 5-24 5-24 5-25 5-25 5-25 5-25 5-26 5-26 5-26 5-26 5-27 5-27 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-28 5-29 5-30
Creek and
6-1
6-1 6-3 6-3 6-4 6-4 6-5
ix

TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)

6.7 Property 6 6-5
6.8 Property 7 6-6
6.9 Property 8 6-6
6.10 Property 9 6-7
6.11 Property 10 6-7
7.0 Characterization Results for the Vicinity Properties Adjacent to SLAPS 7-1
7.1 Banshee Road 7-1
7.2 Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS 7-2
7.3 St. Louis Airport Authority Property 7-2
7.4 Ball Field Area 7-3
x

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure Title 1-1 Locations of FUSRAP Properties in the St. Louis, 1-2 Missouri, Area 1-2 Locations of the Latty Avenue Properties and 1-4 SLAPS 1-3 Locations of the Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties 1-6 1-4 Locations of the Haul Roads surveyed by BNI for DOE 1-7 1-5 Locations of the Haul Roads Vicinity Properties 1-9 1-6 Locations of the SLAPS Vicinity Properties 1-12 1-7 Locations of the Coldwater Creek Vicinity Properties 1-15 2-1 Survey Grid for the Vicinity Properties Adjacent to Latty Avenue 2-2 2-2 Survey Grid for the Haul Roads and Associated Vicinity Properties 2-3 2-3 survey Grid !or the SLAPS Vicinity Properties 2-4 2-4 survey Grid for Coldwater Creek 2-6 2-5 Gamma Exposure Rate Measurement Locations at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to HISS 2-8 2-6 Gamma Exposure Rate Measurement Locations at SLAPS and Vicinity Properties 2-9 3-1 Surface Soil Samplin9 Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Property l on Latty Avenue 3-6 3-2 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property l on Latty Avenue 3-7 3-3 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property l on Latty Avenue 3-8 3-4 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-9 3-5 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-10

xi

LIST OF FIGURES {continued)
Fiqure Title Page
3-6 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 2 on Latty Avenue 3-11
3-7 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-12
3-8 Subsurface Soil Samplinq Locations tor Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-13
3-9 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 3 on Latty Avenue 3-14
3-10 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization ot Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-15
3-11 Subsurface Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-16
3-12 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 4 on Latty Avenue 3-17
3-13 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Property 5 on Latty Avenue 3-18
3-14 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization ot Property s on Latty Avenue 3-19
3-lS Areas and Depths or Radioactive Contamination at Property s on Latty Avenue 3-20
3-16 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Property 6 on Seeger Industrial Drive 3-21
3-17 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Property 6 on Seeger Industrial Drive 3-22
C-1 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-7
4-2 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-8
4-3 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to 9200 Latty Avenue 4-9
xii

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Fiqure Title Paqe
4-4 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hanley Road 4-10
4-5 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization or the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hanley Road 4-11
4-6 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-12
4-7 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-14
4-8 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property South of SLAPS 4-16
4-9 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek 4-18
4-10 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Coldwater Creek 4-19
4-11 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and South of Latty Avenue 4-20
4-12 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and South of Latty Avenue 4-21
4-13 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Norrolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Hazelwood Avenue and North or Latty Avenue 4-22
4-14 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization or the Norrolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue 4-23
4-15 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Property Adjacent to Eva Avenue 4-24
5-1 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Latty Avenue 5-31
xiii

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Fiqure Title Paqe
S-2 Subsurface Soil Samplinq Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Latty Avenue 5-33
S-3 Areas and Depths or Radioactive Contamination at Latty Avenue 5-35
S-4 Composite surface Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-37
5-5 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-39
5-6 Subsurface Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of McDonnell Boulevard 5-41
S-7 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at McDonnell Boulevard 5-43
S-8 Composite Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue 5-45
S-9 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue 5-47
S-10 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Hazelwood Avenue 5-49
S-11 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Hazelwood Avenue 5-51
S-12 Composite Sur!ace Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Pershall Road 5-53
S-13 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Pershall Road 5-55
5-14 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Pershall Road 5-58
5-15 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Pershall Road 5-60
S-16 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 2 5-62
5-17 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 3 5-63
xiv

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure Title Page
5-18 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization o! Haul Roads Vicinity Property 4 5-64
5-19 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 5 5-65
5-20 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 5 5-66
5-21 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 6 5-67
5-22 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 7 5-68
5-23 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 7 5-69
5-24 Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 8 5-70
5-25 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 9 5-71
5-26 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 9 5-72
5-27 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 10 5-73
5-28 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 10 S-74
5-29 Soil Sampling Locations Cor Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 11 5-75
5-30 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 11 5-76
5-31 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 12 5-77

xv

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure Title Page
S-32 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 13 5-78
5-33 Soil Samplinq Locations !or RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14 5-79
S-34 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14 5-80
S-35 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 14A 5-81
S-36 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 15 5-83
S-37 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 15 5-84
5-38 Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 16 5-85
5-39 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 16 5-86
5-40 Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 17 5-87
S-41 Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 19 5-88
S-42 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 19 5-89
5-43 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 20 5-90
5-44 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 20 5-91
5-45 Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 20A 5-92

xvi

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure Title Page
5-46 Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 21 5-93
5-47 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 21 5-94
5-48 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 22 5-95
5-49 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 22 5-96
5-50 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization or Haul Roads Vicinity Property 23 5-97
5-51 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 23 5-98
5-52 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 24 5-99
5-53 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 24 5-100
5-54 Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 25 5-101
5-55 Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 26 5-102
5-56 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 26 S-103
5-57 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 27 5-104
5-58 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 27 S-105
5-59 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 28 5-106

xvii

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)

Figure 5-60
5-61
5-62 5-63 5-64
5-65 5-66 5-67
5-68 5-69 5-70
5-71 5-72
5-73

Title
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 29
Soil Samplinq Locations !or Radiological
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 30
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 30
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 31
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 31A
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 32
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 32
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 33
Areas and Depths o! Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 33
Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization o! Haul Roads Vicinity Property 34
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 34
surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1988 Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35
Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1988 Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35
Soil Samplinq Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35
5-107
5-108 5-109 5-110
5-111
5-112 5-113 5-114
5-115
5-116 5-117 5-118 5-119 5-120
xviii

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
[igure Title Page
5-74 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination
at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 35

5-121
5-75 Surface Soil Samplin9 Locations for 1987
Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads
Vicinity Property 37

5-122
5-76 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 5-123
5-77 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 5-124
5-78 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 37 5-125
5-79 Surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 5-126
5-80 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 5-127
5-81 Soil Sampling Locations for 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 5-128
5-82 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 38 5-129
5-83 surface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 5-130
5-84 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 5-131
5-85 Soil Sampling Locations ror 1989 Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39 5-132
5-86 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at
Haul Roads Vicinity Property 39

5-133
5-87 Soil Sampling Locations for RadiologicalCharacterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 40 5-134
xix

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure Title Page
5-88 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 40 5-135
5-89 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 41 5-136
5-90 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 41 5-137
5-91 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization or Haul Roads Vicinity Property 42 S-138
5-92 Areas and Depths o! Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 42 5-139
5-93 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 43 5-140
5-94 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 43 5-141
5-95 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 44 5-142
5-96 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 44 5-143
5-97 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 45 5-144
5-98 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 45 S-145
5-99 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization or Haul Roads Vicinity Property 46 5-146
5-100 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 47 5-147
5-101 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 47 5-148

xx

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)

Figure 5-102
5-103 5-104 5-105 5-106 5-107 5-108 5-109 5-110 5-111 5-112 S-113 5-114
Title
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 48
Areas and Depths o! Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 48
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 48A
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 49
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 50
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property Sl
Soil sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 52
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 53
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Haul Roads Vicinity Property 53
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads VicinityProperty 54
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property SS
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 56
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 57
5-149 5-150 5-151 5-152 5-153 5-154 5-155 5-156 5-157 5-158 5-159 5-160 5-161
xxi

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)

Figure
5-115
5-116
5-117
5-118
5-119
5-120
5-121
5-122
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
Title
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 58
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at
Haul Roads Vicinity Property 58
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical
Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity
Property 59
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 60
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 61
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 62
Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 63
Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Haul Roads Vicinity Property 63A
surface Sediment Samplinq Locations for 1986 Radioloqical Characterization of Coldwater Creek
Soil Sampling Locations for 1987 Radiological Characterization of Coldwater Creek
Soil Sampling Locations Cor Radioloqical Characterization of 1.5 Miles of Coldwater creek North of Pershall Road
Soil Samplinq Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property l on Coldwater Creek
Soil Sampling Locations for Radioloqical Characterization of Property 2 on Coldwater Creek
Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Property 2 on Coldwater Creek
5-162 5-163
5-164
5-165
5-166
5-167
5-168
5-169 6-9 6-11
6-13 6-15 6-16 6-17
xxii

LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure Title

6-7 Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Property 3 on Coldwater Creek 6-18
6-8 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 4 on Coldwater Creek 6-19
6-9 Soil Sampling Location for RadiologicalCharacterization o! Property 5 on Coldwater Creek 6-20
6-10 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 6 on Coldwater Creek 6-21
6-ll Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 7 on Coldwater Creek 6-22
6-12 Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Property 8 on Coldwater Creek 6-23
6-13 Soil Sampling Location for Radiological Characterization of Property 9 on Coldwater Creek 6-24
6-14 Soil Sampling Location for Radiological Characterization of Property 10 on Coldwater Creek 6-25
7-l Sur(ace Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of Banshee Road 7-6
7-2 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of Banshee Road 7-8
7-3 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at Banshee Road 7-10
7-4 surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS 7-12
7-5 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations !or Radiological Characterization of the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS 7-14
7-6 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Ditches to the North and South of SLAPS 7-16
7-7 surface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the St. Louis Airport Authority Property 7-18
7-8 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the St. Louis Airport Authority Property 7-20
xxiii

7-9 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the St. Louis Airport Authority Property 7-22
7-10 Surface Soil Sampling Locations tor Radiological Characterization of the Ball Field Area 7-24
7-11 Subsurface Soil Sampling Locations for Radiological Characterization of the Ball Field Area 7-25
7-12 Areas and Depths of Radioactive Contamination at the Ball Field Area 7-26
xxiv

LIST OF TABLES

Table Title

1-1 Tax Map Reference List !or Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties 1-5
1-2 Tax Map Reference List !or Haul Roads VicinityProperties 1-10
1-3 Tax Map Reference List for Coldwater Creek VicinityProperties 1-14
2-1 Summary or Residual Contamination Guidelines (or FUSRAP Properties in the St. Louis, Missouri, Area 2-13
2-2 Backqcound Radionuclide Concentrations in Soil and Radiation Levels in the St. Louis Area 2-15
NOTE: TABLES 3-1 THROUGH 5-7 ARE CONTAINED IN VOLUME II OF THIS REPORT. TABLES 5-8 THROUGH 7-8 ARE CONTAINED IN VOLUME III.
xxv

AEC BNI CJ!!RCLA
DOE FUSRAP
HISS MED NRC NEPA ORAU ORNL PIC PMC SLAPS SLDS TMA/E TMC TSCL
ACRONYMS

Atomic Enerqy Commission Bechtel National, Inc. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
U.S. Department of Enerqy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Pr:oqr:am Hazelwood Interim Storaqe Site Manhattan Enqineer District Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Environmental Policy Act Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge National Laboratory pressurized ionization chamber project management contractor St. Louis Airport Site St. Louis Downtown Site Thermo Analytical/Eberline Technical Measurements Center temporary slope and construction line
xxvi

cm
2
cm cpm ft
h
ha
in.
km m
m2
3
m
mi mrem mrem/yr mR/h µR/h pCi/q
yd) yr
ABBREVIATIONS
centimeter square centimeter counts per minute foot hour hectares inch kilometer meter square meter cubic meter mile mi11irem millirem per year milliroentgens per hour microroentgens per hour picocuries per qram cubic yard year
xxvii

1.0 INTRODUCTION

The characterization activities reported in this document were
conducted as part o! the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action
Proqram (FUSRAP), a U.S. Department o! Enerqy (DOE) e!!ort to
identity and clean up or otherwise control sites where residual
radioactive contamination (exceeding current quidelines) remains
from the early years of the nation’s atomic enerqy proqram or from commercial operations causing conditions that Conqress has mandated DOE to remedy. Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) acts as the project management contractor (PMC), responsible to DOE Cor planninq, managin9. and implementing PUSRAP. Surveys were conducted from 1986 through 1989 at DOE’s direction by BNI and its radioloqical subcontractor. Thermo Analytical/Eberline CTMA/E).
1.1 PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES
This report describes the procedures used to conduct the 1986
through 1989 radiological characterization o! FUSRAP properties in
the St. Louis. Missouri. area (see Fiqure 1-1). These properties
include
o Latty Avenue vicinity properties

o Portions ot Coldwater Creek and its vicinity properties

o Nor!olk and Western Railroad properties

o St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) vicinity properties

o Portions of Latty Avenue. McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, and Pershall Road (the haul roads) and associated vicinity properties

The St. Louis sites have been placed on the National Priorities List. which is a list of sites identi!ied !or remediation under the Comprehensive Environmental Response. Compensation. and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, also referred to as Super!und.
1-1

The objective of these characterization activities is to define the
horizontal and vertical boundaries of radioactive contamination
exceedinq DOE quidelines. The data collected rrom the radioloqical
surveys discussed in this report will be incorporated into the
remedial investigation and Ceasibility study reports for the St.
Louis sites.
1.2 LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION
SLAPS is an 8.8-ha (21.7-acre) tract located in St. Louis County, Missouri. approximately 24 km (15 mi) from downtown St. Louis and immediately north o( the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. SLAPS is bounded by the Norfolk and Western Railroad and Banshee Road on the south, Coldwater Creek on the west, and McDonnell Boulevard and adjacent recreational fields on the north and east. Fiqure 1-2 shows the location of SLAPS and the Latty Avenue properties. The Latty Avenue properties [Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) on the eastern half and the Futura Coatinqs property on the western half] are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. These properties cover a 4.S-ha (11-acre) tract located in the city limits of Hazelwood and are approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) northeast of the control tower of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.
Each Latty Avenue vicinity property characterized as part or the radioloqical survey was assiqned a numerical identifier that corresponds to a St. Louis County tax map locator number. Table 1-1 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator number. The Latty Avenue vicinity properties lie within the cities or Hazelwood and Berkeley and are shown in Figure 1-3.
The haul roads, believed to have been used durinq waste transfer among the St. Louis properties, include Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, Hazelwood Avenue, Pershall Road, Eva Avenue, and Frost Avenue. Characterization results from the right-of-way of these roads are reported with tho•• ot the appropriate associated vicinity properties. These routes traverse Hazelwood, Berkeley, and St. Louis and are located near HISS and SLAPS as shown in Fiqure 1-4.
1-3

.-….
,…… .”‘l ‘·,
i ‘·, / .
. , I
I ·,./
I

I
i PER9HAu RO.
L._,
;
·-·-·-·-‘.’·-…….,
BERKELEY I
r·-·-·-·-.
,…1
I
ro DOWNTOWN -·'”‘.
“”‘
ST. LOUIS \
NOTTO SCALE
FIGURE 1-2 LOCATIONS OF THE LATIY AVENUE PROPERTIES AND SLAPS

TABLE 1-1

TAX MAP REFERENCE LIST FOR
LATTY AVENUE VICINITY PROPERTIES

Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number
Property 1 Property 2 Property 3 Property 4 Property S Property 6
lOKS30098 lOKS10012 lOKS20022 lOKS20044 lOKS20033 10KS10067
1-S

,—————,
, / II
/ r———-11
(:.______J I I
I I,
I 11
I I,
I ‘I
I I,
‘.t
I I I “””‘°'” I ‘”—-.II I
I I
um •9.l
L
~–~~~~;.::::::::::==::::::::~;;=::::;;;;:;;;=::;::;:::::::;:::::====;:::::::=====-:.——–L…..!·!..J!!!’
I I I I
II I ,I I
EJ'[?
HISS
I TY ] I ~ITY 4 I l’llll'(WTT ~ I
I I I
I I I
Q I ~——-l______ I , ·.~—-‘I I
(\ I
\) ——-.__L____/I
I I
Cl BUILD INC
r—-o
I PllOf'{RTY ‘ I
—–PROP£RTY BOUNOARY
I I
•”°
I I
I
I I r
I • SOii
§
~
I
~
-~
~ I
~
~
I I

FIGURE 1-3 LOCATIONS OF THE LATTY AVENUE VICINfTY PROPERTIES
S34″”51 I.OQI

…..
I …..J

• • • • HAUL ROADS
0 IOO tOllO SCAll ..

In addition to these haul roads, several adjacent properties were included as part of the radioloqical characterization (see Fiqure 1-5). Each haul road vicinity property characterized as part of the radiological survey was assigned a numerical identi!ier that corresponds to a St. Louis County tax map locator number. Table 1-2 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator number.
SLAPS was acquired by the Atomic Enerqy Commission (AEC) in 1947.
From that time until approximately 1966, the site was used to store
waste materials !rom the uranium teed materials plant at the St.
Louis Downtown Site (SLDS). Radioactive contamination o( the SLAPS
vicinity properties may be the result or movement of contaminated
soils from SLAPS via surrace runoff or transfer by vehicles. In
1973, ownership of SLAPS was transferred by quitclaim deed from AEC
to the City o! St. Louis. The 1985 Enerqy and Water Development Appropriations Act (Public Law 98-360) authorized DOE to reacquire
the property from the city !or use as a permanent disposal site. Actions to trans(er ownership of the property to DOE have been
initiated.
The SLAPS vicinity properties include Banshee Road, the area south of Banshee Road owned by the St. Louis Airport Authority, the
recreational areas to the north of SLAPS known as the ball field area, and the ditches to the north and south or SLAPS. Fiqure 1-6 shows the locations or the SLAPS vicinity properties.
Coldwater Creek, a tributary of the Missouri River, has an overall length of 30.6 km (19 mi). The creek, which originates about 5.8 km
(3.6 mi) south or SLAPS at a amall spring-fed lake, !lows !or a distance of 152 m (500 !t) along the west side of SLAPS and discharges into the Missouri River about 22.5 km (14 mi) northeast of the site. Beneath the airport, Coldwater Creek !lows in an underqround drainage passage. The location or Coldwater Creek is shown in Fiqure 1-1.
1-8

TABLE 1-2

TAX MAP REFERENCE HAUL ROADS VICINITY LIST FOR PROPERTIES
Page l o( Reference 2 Number Tax Map Locator Number

Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property
Property

1
2
3
4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14A
15
16
17
18
19
20
20A
21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 31A 32 33 34 35
lOL220893 10L240093 10L520098 10L240082 10L330095 10L330040 10L330031 10L330022 10L330073 10L340023 10L340014 10L340032 10L310011 llK510035 State or Missouri McDonnell Boulevard Right-or-Way 11K520056 10K2l0064 10K210053 lOK230051 10K23003l lOK230040 lOK230031 lOK230073 10K240106 10K240094 10K330140 10K22015l 10K220140 10K330030 10K330063 10K330074 10K330085 10K310111 10K330131 10K330173 10K330113 10K330122 10K610080
1-10

TABLE 1-2

(continued)
Page 2 ot 2
Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number
Property 37 Property 38 Property 39 Property 40 Property 41 Property 42 Property 43 Property 44 Property 45 Property 46 Property 47 Property 48 Property 48A Property 49 Property 50 Property 51 Property 52 Property 53 Property 54 Property 55 Property 56 Property 57 Property 58 Property 59 Property 60 Property 61 Property 62 Property 63 Property 63A
lOK520066 10K540097 10K630303 09K220l40 lOK540031 09K220041 10K540075 09K220030 09K220052 09K220074 09K220085 09K220184 09K220173 09K310153 09K310164 09K310175 09K322187 09K220162 09K220106 09K210053 09K210064 09Kl40026 09Kl40015 09Kll0304 09Kl30027 09Kl30016 09Kl30038 10K430020 State of Missouri Pershall Road Right-of-Way
1-11

……
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TABLE 1-3

TAX MAP REFERENCE LIST FOR
COLDWATER CREEK VICINITY PROPERTIES

Reference Number Tax Map Locator Number
Property l 09Kl2009S Property 2 09Kl20149 Property 3 09Kl20040 Property 4 09Kl20127 Property 5 09Kl20116 Property 6 10K440030 Property 7 10K440096 Property 8 10K440074 Property 9 10K420010 Property 10 10Kl40024
1-13

Each vicinity property associated with Coldwater Creek was assigned a numerical identifier that corresponds to a St. Louis County tax map locator number. Table 1-3 references the assigned identifier to its respective tax map locator number. Figure 1-7 shows the vicinity properties associated with Coldwater Creek.
1.3 HISTORY AND PREVIOUS RAPIOLOGICAL SURVEYS
In 1966, ore residues and uranium-and radium-bearinq process wastes stored at SLAPS were purchased by the Continental Mining and Milling Company or Chicago, Illinois, and placed in storaqe at 9200 Latty Avenue. These wastes were generated by a St. Louis plant (currently owned by Mallinckrodt, Inc.) between 1942 and the late 1950s under contracts with AEC and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). Some of the residues were dried in two buildings on site before being shipped to a Colorado mill. The rest were removed from 9200 Latty Avenue (currently HISS) in 1973, to terminate a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license !or storage, and the property was later sold to the current owner. At this time, barium sulfate residues were reportedly diluted with site soil and transported to West Lake Landfill in St. Louis County.
The residues stored at 9200 Latty Avenue were deposited directly on
the ground. When the last residues were removed !rom the grounu surface, a reported 30-to 46-cm (12-to 18-in.) layer of topsoil also was removed before the property was sold. It appears that parts of the property are contaminated in excess or current guidelines as a result o! mechanical earth-moving activities and water percolation (Refs. 1-1 and 1-2). The primary contaminant is
thorium-230. Much or the uranium and radium in the ore had been removed during earlier processing. It is possible that McDonnell Boulevard was the haul road used for the transport or barium sulfate residues. Pershall Road and Hazelwood Avenue also were possible haul roads during the transport o! residues among the St. Louis sites. The soils alonq the shoulders of Latty Avenue also were surveyed and found to be contaminated, possibly as a result or residues spilling from the transport trucks.
1-14


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1.3.l Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties
In 1981, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) performed a
radiological survey of the northern and eastern boundaries of HISS
!or NRC (Refs. 1-3 and 1-4). Levels or contamination, principally
thorium-230, similar to those levels on the site were round in both
areas.
In September 1983, DOE directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a preliminary survey or properties adjacent to and in the vicinity of HISS at 9200 Latty Avenue to determine if radioactive contamination in excess o! quidelines was present. The potentially contaminated areas identified during that preliminary evaluation were then more thoroughly surveyed by ORNL during January and February 1984. Results of the survey established that radioactive contamination was present over most or the HISS vicinity properties, extending north and south in some areas onto adjacent private properties along Latty Avenue (Refs. 1-5 and 1-6). ORNL discovered that redistribution or the contamination had occurred, probably as a result of flooding, surface runoff, and road and utility line activities. The major contaminant found was thorium-230: radium-226 and uranium-238 were present in lesser amounts.
Based on the ORNL characterization, DOE directed BNI to perform
remedial action in 1984 on the contaminated areas within the
temporary slope and construction line (TSCL) along Latty Avenue
(Re!. 1-7). The TSCL included all areas that could have been disturbed during a drainage improvement project being carried out by the cities of Hazelwood and Berkeley. During the remedial action, contamination exceeding quidelines was found to extend beyond the TSCL.
In 1986, DOE directed BNI to provide radiological support to the cities during their road improvement project. During this coverage, radium-226 and thorium-230 contamination in excess of DOE remedial action guidelines was !ound at depths ranging Crom 0.6 to 2.4 m (2 to 8 ft) along and under Latty Avenue. Based on gamma count rates,
1-16

materials contaminated in excess or remedial action quidelines were
removed and placed in storage at HISS. Approximately 4,206 m 3
(4,600 yd3 ) of material was placed in a storaqe pile developed
speci!ically to accommodate these materials and covered with a
low-permeability membrane. In addition to qamma scanninq the soil
that was not placed in storaqe at HISS, qross alpha countinq was
used as a screeninq technique. Usinq qross alpha counting, soil
samples were scanned ror alpha-emittinq radionuclides, such as
thorium-230, in excess of DOE remedial action quidelines. Soils
that did not exhibit contamination in excess of DOE remedial action
quidelines were used as fill material on the railroad property
located between the Futura Coatinqs site and Coldwater Creek and
alonq the entire lenqth of Latty Avenue.
Radiological characterization of the Latty Avenue vicinity
properties was necessary to de(ine the locations and boundaries of
the contamination identified in the ORNL survey and to evaluate disposal alternatives.
1.3.2 Coldwater Creek and Vicinity Properties
In 1982, DOE directed BNI to perform a radioloqical characterization or the ditches to the north of SLAPS and portions of Coldwater Creek
(Ref. 1-8). Results or this survey indicated that gamma-emitting contamination exceeding remedial action quidelines was present. This survey did not include measuring thorium-230 concentrations in soils. Subsequent analysis of additional radionuclides showed the presence of thorium-230 in above-quideline concentrations: therefore, all later field work conducted in the St. Louis area involved analyzinq for thorium-230. Characterization efforts continued in 1986 at the SLAPS ditches and involved analyzinq archived soil samples Crom the 1982 survey for thorium-230. The results of these analyses indicated the need to collect soil samples beyond the area surveyed in 1982 (on the ball field) to adequately determine the extent of contamination. Results for the ball field characterization are reported in Section 7.0 o! this report.
1-17

Additionally, sediment samples were collected in 1986 from the sides
and center of Coldwater Creek beginninq at SLAPS and continuing
downstream to HISS. The data from these samples indicated spotty
contamination along the entire distance.
l.3.3 Norfolk and Western Railroad Properties and SLAPS Vicinity Properties
A radioloqical and limited chemical characterization was conducted at SLAPS in 1986 by BNI. Results or this survey showed contamination present on SLAPS extending to depths as great as 5.5 m (18 ft) (Re! 1-9). The Nor!olk and Western Railroad property Corms the southern boundary of SLAPS. The radioloqical characterization of the SLAPS vicinity properties, Banshee Road, and the railroad property was necessary to define the maqnituue and boundaries or the contamination and evaluate disposal alternatives. No formal radioloqical characterization had been performed on these properties until that or 1986-1989.
1.3.4 Haul Roads
In 1985, DOE directed ORNL to perform a radioloqical survey or the roads thought to have been used to transport contaminated material to and from SLAPS and HISS (Ref. 1-10). Results of the ORNL gamma radiation walkover scan of the roadsides showed areas where gamma exposure rates are in excess of background radiation levels. Gamma exposure rates up to 90 µR/h were round on the surface of McDonnell Boulevard. Soil sample analysis results !rom the 1985 survey showed thorium-230 to be the major contaminant. As a result or this survey, parts of Hazelwood Avenue, Pershall Road, and McDonnell Boulevard were designated !or remedial action in 1986.
1-18

REFERENCES FOR SECTION 1.0
1-1 Bechtel National, Inc. Characterization Report for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site, Hazelwood, Missouri, DOE/OR/20722-141, Oak Ridqe, Tenn., June 1987.
1-2 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological Characterization Report !or the Futura Coatings Site, Hazelwood, Missouri, DOE/OR/20722-158, Oak Ridqe, Tenn., July 1987.
1-3 Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Preliminary Radiological Survey ot Proposed Street Right-of-Way at Futura Coatings, Inc., 9200 Latty Avenue. Hazelwood, Missouri, Oak Ridge, Tenn., December 1981.
1-4 Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Concentrations of Radionuclides in Soil Samples from Property at 9150 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri, Oak Ridge, Tenn.• April 28, 1982.
1-5 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Radiological Survey of Latty Avenue in the Vicinity of the Former Cotter Site, Hazelwood/ Berkeley, Missouri CLMOQl), ORNL/TM-10006, Oak Ridge, Tenn., May 1987.
1-6 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Radiological Survey o! Properties in the Vicinity of the Former Cotter Site, Hazelwood/Berkeley, Misaouri CLM003), ORNL/TM-10008, Oak Tenn., May 1987. Ridge,
1-7 Bechtel National, Inc. Hazelwood Site -1984, September 1985. Post-Remedial Action Report for the DOE/OR/20722-76, Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
1-8 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological Survey of the St, Louis Airport Site CSLAPS), Oak Ridge, 1983. the Ditches at Tenn., August

1-19

1-9 Bechtel National, Inc. Radiological and Limited Chemical Characterization Report for the St. Louis Airport Site, St. Louis, Missouri, DOE/OR/20722-163, Oak Ridqe, Tenn., Auqust 1987.
1-10 Oak Ridqe National Laboratory. Results of the Radiation Measurements Taken at Transportation Routes CLM004} in Hazelwood, Missouri. ORNL/RASA-86/31, Oak Ridqe, Tenn., December 1986.
1-20

2.0 STUDY AREA INVESTIGATION

The radiological characterization surveys conducted at the FUSRAP
properties in St. Louis consisted of the following steps:
establishing a reproducible qrid system, clearing the area to be
surveyed as appropriate, performing qamma radiation walkover scans
and near-surface qamma radiation measurements where applicable, and
collecting and analyzinq surface and subsurface soil samples. The
types of radioloqical measurements taken and the methods used are
described in Subsections 2.2 and 2.3.
2.1 GRID SYSTEM
A civil surveyor established a 15-m (50-ft) qrid on the vicinity properties adjacent to Latty Avenue by marking the intersections o! a series or perpendicular lines, as shown in Figure 2-1. [Fiqure 2-1 is marked at 61-m (200-ft) intervals because of the size o! the drawinq.] The grid oriqin used during the remedial action conducted in 1984 along the Latty Avenue riqht-of-way was reestablished.
A 15-m (50-ft) qrid was also established over the haul roads anu adjacent properties, extending approximately 46-m (150 ft) from the
roadways (see Figure 2-2). [Figure 2-2 is marked at 305-m
(1,000-ft) intervals because of the size of the drawing.] A 15-m
(SO-ft) grid was established over the SLAPS vicinity properties as shown in Figure 2-3. [Figure 2-3 is marked at 61-m (200-ft) intervals because of the size o! the drawing.] The grid origin was the southwest corner of SLAPS. These grids were tied to the SLAPS qrid system and to the Missouri state grid system with sufficient detail to allow for reestablishment at a later date. When characterization work was initially performed at 9200 Latty Avenue and SLAPS, each site was treated independently and a qrid was established at each. At that time, it was not suspected that contamination would be as extensive as it is in the area and that the two sites would be essentially continuous. This accounts for having di!!erent grid systems !or the two sites.
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Minimal clearing was done along Coldwater Creek so that a traverse line could be established with right angle offsets at 152-m (SOO-ft) intervals (Figure 2-4). The traverse line was referenced back to the SLAPS qrid. Samplinq locations were determined by measuring along the offset lines. All chatacterization data correspond to coordinates on the qrids. All qtids shown in the !iqures in this document are displayed in measutement units or !eet.
2.2 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS
The characterization sutvey con•isted of two majot components:
surface surveys and subsurCace investigations. Surface surveys were performed Cirst to provide information about the patterns o! contamination and to assist in the identification of areas in which
subsurface contamination could be present. The subsurface
investigations were performed subsequently to establish the depths
of contamination in areas that the surface surveys identified as
being contaminated. An additional purpose or the subsurface
investigations was to locate any subsurface contamination that
lacked surface manifestation.
2.2.1 Methods
Two types of surface survey methods were used: walkover surveys anu
near-surface gamma radiation surveys. Initial gamma radiation walkover scans were performed within grid blocks on the vicinity
properties adjacent to Latty Avenue and SLAPS usinq an unshielded gamma scintillation detector. A gamma radiation walkover scan was done on accessible areas or Coldwater Creek’s banks and any associated ptoperties. Ateas in which readings exceeded twice the gamma radiation background level were marked on a site drawing. This type or survey cover& virtually all the ground surface and has the advantage that it can be conducted quickly: however, the boundaries ot the areas identified as being contaminated may not be precisely correct because of the e!!ect of nearby contamination on detector readings.
2-S

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Near-surface qamma radiation aeasurements were made 30 cm (12 in.) above the qround surface at 3.8-a (12.5-ft) intervals in the areas identiCied as contaminated on the basis of the 9amma radiation walkover scan. This survey was performed to deCine aore clearly the boundaries of contamination identi!ieu by the earlier walkover survey. The same kind or detector that was used durin9 the walkover survey, a 5-cm by 5-cm (2-in. by 2-in.) sodium-iodide, thallium-activated [Nal(Tl)) detector, was used durinq this survey. The detector was mounted in a probe assembly surrounded with a conical lead shield to reduce the qamma intensity throuqh the sides, thus producinq a downward directional response. The detector was calibrated at the Technical Measurements Center (TMC) in Grano Junction, Colorado.
It should be pointed out that neither the walkover nor the
near-surface gamma radiation survey is effective for detecting the presence of thorium-230. Thorium-230 is an alpha-emitting radionuclide that cannot be detected in situ.
Gamma exposure rates at l m (3 ft) above the qround were measured on the NorColk and Western Railroad property adjacent to HISS anu on the SLAPS vicinity properties to the north and south of SLAPS using a pressurized ionization chamber (PIC). The PIC has a response to gamma radiation that is proportional to exposure in roentgens. Readings were made at 37 selected qrid points on the Norfolk anu Western Railroad property adjacent to HISS (see Figure 2-5) and at 69 locations at SLAPS and vicinity properties (see Fiqure 2-6). This exposure rate information will be valuable for use in remedial action planning, environmental aonitoring, and the preparation of documentation required by CERCLA/National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities.
Subsurface investigations were conducted by drilling and/or hanu.augering boles at most 30.5-m (100-ft) grid intersections. The depth to which each borehole was drilled was based on guidance Crom
2-7

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the geoloqist on site and the radiological support representative.
The hand-augered holes were typically 1 to 1.3 m (3 to 4 ft) deep.
Although gamma loqginq is typically used to determine the depth or
subsurface contamination, thorium-230 (the principal contaminant)
cannot be detected in situ: therefore, continuous soil samples were
collected !tom the sur!ace to the bottom o! the hole by driving a
split ‘ spoon sampler in advance of the auger. Deviations !tom this
methodology required by !ield conditions are described in each
section of this report.
Downhole gamma logging was performed in each characterization hole
to indicate the general depth or contamination !rom gamma-emitting
radionuclides. Gamma logging was accomplished by lowering an
unshielded Nal(Tl) detector into the hole and recording the count
rate as a function or depth. Downhole gamma logging data were used
for the selection and analysis or soil samples to determine the
concentrations of uranium, radium, and thorium.
2.2.2 Sample Collection and Analysis
Biased surface soil samples [Oto 15 cm (0 to 6 in.)] were collected
based on results from the qamma radiation walkover scans. Each sample was counted for 10 minutes using an intrinsic germanium detector housed in a lead counting cave lined with cadmium and
copper. The pulse height distribution was sorted using a computer-based multichannel analyzer. Radionuclide concentrations were determined by comparing the gamma spectrum of each sample with the spectrum o! a certified counting standard for the radionuclide of interest.
Subsurface soil samples were collected from the borehole and hand augered hole locations. Wherever possible, continuous sampling was performed from the surface to in-situ (not previously disturbed) soil, as identified by the field geologist.
2-10

Following sample collection, the downhole gamma loqs were revieweu,
and samples were selected for analysis or uranium-238, radium-226,
and thorium-232 concentrations. Samples were typically chosen !or
analysis at 0.3-m (1-!t) intervals. These analyses were performed
using the gamma spectroscopy system described previously.
At the same time that samples were selected !or the analysis program described above, samples were also identified for thorium-230 analysis. The primary goal of the thorium-230 analysis program was to de~ermine whether above-quideline concentrations o! thorium-230 exist in areas where neither uranium-238, radium-226, nor thorium-232 is present in concentrations exceeding guidelines.
Experience in the St. Louis area bas shown that when the radium-226 concentration is elevated above background levels, it is reasonable to assume that the concentration of thorium-230 exceeds the DOE guideline or lS pCi/g. Based on this rationale, as well as on the downhole gamma logs and available gamma spectroscopy results, samples were selected !or thorium-230 analysis. Typically, this meant that samples were selected from regions of each borehole where gamma logging results showed a decrease in the count rate, indicating a drop in the radium-226 concentration.
To expedite the sampling and analysis process, multiple-depth samples were selected from each borehole for initial analysis. Selection or these samples was based on an evaluation or gamma
logs. By using this selection method, the boundaries of contamination could be established in a single phase of analysis. As analytical data became available, other samples also were selected to resolve inconsistencies or to provide additional
information on specific regions. It should be noted that the sampling locations depicted in figures in this document represent locations !rom which soil samples were analyzed. In some instances, soil samples may have been collected Crom a property but analysis was not necessary.
2-11

2.3 CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS
The results of the characterization effort for each qroup of FUSRAP properties in the St. Louis area are described in the !ollowinq sections. To permit comparison o! the results with current DOE quidelines for radionuclide& in aoil, these quidelines are presented in Table 2-1 (see Ref. 2-1). Actual cleanup limits will be determined in the remedial investiqation/!easibility study-environmental impact study process. A quideline Cor uranium in soil at these properties ia currently beinq established.
All direct field measurements and laboratory results in this report represent gross readings: backqround measurements and concentrations have not been subtracted. All downhole gamma loqging measurements reported in this document have been rounded to the nearest thousand
cpm.
Analysis results !or soil are provided in Sections 3.0 throuqh 7.0. The “less than• (<) notation in reportinq results indicates that the radionuclide was not present in concentrations that are quantifiable with the instruments and techniques used. The "less than• value represents the lower limit o! the quantitative capacity o! the instrument and technique used. Thererore, the actual concentration o! the radionuclide is less than the value preceded by the "less than• symbol. Determination of a "less than• value is based on various factors, including the volume, size, and weiqht or the sample: the type of detector used: the counting time: and the background count rate. In addition, because radioactive decay is a random process, a correlation between the rate of disinteqration and a qiven radionuclide concentration cannot be precisely established. For this reason, the exact concentration of the radionuclide cannot be determined. As such, each value that can be quantitatively determined bas an associated uncertainty term Ci2 siqma), which represents the amount by which the actual concentration can be 2-12 TABLI 2-1 SUMMARY OF ll!SII>UAL COllTAKIVATIOI CUIDELIVES
FOR FUSRAP PROPERTIES I• THE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, AREA

BASIC DOSE LIMITS
The basic limit for the annual radiation dose received by an individual member of the general public is 100 mram/yr effective dose equivalent above background.
SOIL (LAJJD) GUIDILil’E
Radionuclide Soil Concentration (pCi/g) Above Background•,b,c
Radium-226 5 pCi/g, averaged over the first 15 ca of •oil
Radium-228 balov the surface; 15 pCi/g when averaged over
Thorium-230 any 15-cm-thick •oil layer below the surface
Thorium-232 layer.
Other radionuclide& Soil guidelines will be calculated on a
•ite-specific basis using the DOE manual developed
for thb u•e.

8 These guidelines take into account ingrowth of radium-226 from thorium-230 and of radium-228 from thorium-232, and assume secular equilibrium. If either thorium-230 and radium-226 or thorium-232 and radium-228 are both present, not in •ecular equilibrium, the guidelines apply to the higher concentration. If other mixtures of radionuclides occur, the concentrations of individual radionuclides •hall be reduced •o that the dose for the mixtures will not exceed the basic dose limit or th• 8Ull of the ratios of the soil concentrations of each radionuclide to the allowable limit for that radionuclide will not exceed 1 (unity).
~ese guidelines represent residual concentrations above background averaged across 15-cm-thick layers as described above and over any contiguous 100-cm2
•urface area.
Ctocalized concentrations in axe••• of th••• limits are allowable p

Post

2015 – EPA – USACE – West Lake Landfill – Communication Summary for St. Louis District FUSRAP

Key Messages:
Key Stakeholders~
Congressional, public, community
groups, state and federal agencies.
Communication Goal:
Communicate the authority, missions and status of the
USAGE St. Louis FUSRAP Program
1. Public Health: FUSRAP protects public health and the environment by removing low-level radioactive contamination generated by activities of the
Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) during the early atomic weapons program in the 1940s and 1950s.
2. FUSRAP has moved more than 1 million cubic yards of contaminated materials since USAGE took on the mission, and maintains an outstanding safety
record (4,288 days without injury.)
3. FUSRAP’s objectives are to protect public health, execute the approved alternative for cleaning up the radioactive contamination above health-based
cleanup guidelines, and minimize adverse effects on area business operations.
Key Talking Points:
Mission: USAGE St. Louis District, is conducting a radiological cleanup program for four Missouri sites (SLDS, SLAPS, SLAPS VPs, HISS).
These sites contain soils contaminated with radium, thorium, and uranium as a result of activities associated with the Manhattan Engineer
District/Atomic Energy Commission during the nation’s early atomic program in the 1940s and 50s.
Authority: Congress transferred execution of FUSRAP to USAGE, in the 1998 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill. Prior to this bill, FUSRAP
had been managed by the U.S. Department of Energy.
Sites: The complete list of active St. Louis area FUSRAP projects includes:
St. Louis Downtown Sites (SLDS, the Mallinckrodt plant areas and adjacent properties), St. Louis Airport Properties (SLAPS … completed in
FYO?), SLAPS Vicinity Properties, Latty Avenue Properties (HISS, Futura and adjacent properties) Also in the District FUSRAP Program is the
Iowa Army Ammunition Plant.
Madison Site, in Madison, IL, remediation was completed in 2000 and following the 2 year monitoring period, was removed from the list of active
FUSRAP sites in 2002.
Progress: In FY13, 28,500 cubic yards of contaminated material were shipped from the St. Louis FUSRAP sites to an out-of-state, licensed and
permitted disposal facility.
Completion: Tentative dates for completion are 2017-2019 timeframe. Completion dates depend upon future funding levels which are uncertain.
Public Involvement: The St. Louis Oversight Committee is an independent group of community leaders which serve in consultative and
participatory roles with the cleanup of the St. Louis FUSRAP Sites.
As a consultant, the Committee provides comments, recommendations, and community feedback for USAGE in its efforts to clean up these sites.
The Oversight Committee hosts public meetings semiannually, with FUSRAP and other state, local and federal agencies (EPA, Missouri Health
and Senior Services, MO DNR).
1) by Dept of Energy (in which cas
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0054055

Post

2016-01-26 – EPA – West Lake Landfill – EPA discussion of property assurance around West Lake Landfill

To:
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Peterson, Mary[Peterson. [email protected]]
Brincks, Mike
Tue 1/26/2016 11:04:23 PM
Re: Notes from Just Moms meeting
So an anti-stigma guarantee
Sent from my iPhone
On Jan 26, 2016, at 5:00PM, Peterson, Mary wrote:
No. It means a guarantee that they can sell their property -basically it’s an assurance of
sustained property value.
Sent from my iPhone
From: Peterson, Mary
Sent: Monday, January 25, 2016 12:07 PM
To: Hague, Mark Brincks, Mike
Cc: Carey, Curtis
Subject: Notes from Just Moms meeting
Mark, Mike, and Curtis,
We received the notes pasted below from Mike Zlatic with St. Louis County Health
Dept. I have highlighted a few areas for your awareness.
WeO 1/21/16 JustMOMSstl meeting (03/17 /16 next meeting – may be changed due to
St. Patrick’s Day)
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0056269
6:35P Karen
No prayer; recognized elected officials
Reminder to report odors to MDNR
6:38P Karen
Upcoming events
West Lake CAG 02/08/16
FUSRAP Oversight 02/17/16
Saturday 02/20/16 STLCC Wildwood
Community organizer to support Moms is to be recruited by, and funded by,
Lois Gibbs’s organization CHEJ
February 8-10 Mom’s trip to DC (funded by gofundme) to pursue status of
legislation
6:44P Dawn
Update on congressional legislation- keep up the pressure with daily phone calls. Bill
Otto explained the legislative process, i.e., those who introduced the bill must push the
bill or it won’t go anywhere.
6:48P Dawn
West Lake/Bridgeton history recap
6:57P Dawn
Alvarez report
Largest deposit of Thorium in the world at West Lake.
More uranium at West Lake than at a site where uranium is mined.
Pb210 …
Because Republic requested change of venue to federal court, March court date will
probably not occur.
There is documented contamination offsite from West Lake.
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0056270
St. Louis County will need to play a bigger role depending on the …
7:08P Dawn/Karen
Senator Maria Chapelle-Nadal’s ‘buyout’ bill. Testimony next week in
Jefferson City.
7:11P Christen Commuso “Humans of West Lake Landfill” (see attached handout)
Human interest stories- wants more testimonies.
7:15P Dawn
Dr. Khan canceled his appearance tonight but Dawn, Karen, and Harvey have
a meeting with him next week.
7: 17P Karen/Dawn Q&A
Why weren’t yards around Coldwater Creek tested before now?
A: USACE follows the creek, cleans up what they find, then test further
downstream. Request to lobby congressionals to increase FUSRAP funding.
Attend upcoming County Council meeting to support transfer to FUSRAP and
for Dr. Khan to expand (not explained) his health survey.
Comment about necessity to test soil that is being farmed.
Comment about not knowing what to do if/when the ‘landfill blows’.
Comment that the President is immediately involved in Flint MI, but not
West Lake/Bridgeton.
A: Matt Lavanchy explained that alpha emitter needs to be ingested or inhaled,
effects are long term, and different persons respond differently. This will not be a
catastrophic explosion, if the ‘fire’ reaches the RIM (and it has not advanced in the last
year or so). But, we do need a physical barrier.
When do we go to the United Nations to investigate EPA?
A: Dawn urged people to ‘get angry’.
Testing water supply?
A: Drew, representative of Alliance Water, water supplier at/around WSSRAP
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0056271
(Weldon Springs): Won’t see effects of this for ~5 years. Radiation doesn’t leave
water. Review your Consumer Confidence reports from your water supplier.
A: Karen reUnited Nations investigation- Lois Gibbs working on this.
Is the area being monitored?
A: Matt Lavanchy explained that monitoring occurs 24/7. 250,000 tons of S02
left the site in 2013(?). Report odors as soon as you smell them. Radiation in a smoke
plume is not a concern. Shelter in place is a temporary measure.
Comment: Make sure the doctors in the area are informed.
Is vegetation moved offsite?
A: Dawn “not yet” and don’t know where the vegetation will be disposed.
Matt explained that the vegetation will be ground up, placed on site, and
covered with road base.
7:57P Howard? Had been nmning for Bill Otto’s seat but is dropping out and
supporting his opponent, Byron DeLear(?).
Byron thanked him.
8:00P Is the science (facts) available online?
8:01P “Safe Side of the Fence” will be shown on 02/23/16 at a church in Ferguson (see
attached handout)
8:02P Karen looking for 5 persons to write op eds to newspapers.
Looking for someone to track political fundraisers.
8:06P Drew (Alliance Water) started ….
8:08P Karen reiterated WSMOMSstl 3 goals (Buyout within 1 mile, Property
assurance within 3? Miles, Transfer from EPA Superfund to USACE FUSRAP)
8:09P Adjourn

WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0056272
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0056273

Post

2015-11-19 – EPA – West Lake Landfill is more difficult to clean up than other St Louis FUSRAP sites

To:
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Fritz, Matthew[[email protected]]
Hague, Mark
Thur 11/19/2015 6:15:17 PM
FW: New Bill in Senate: R7 OPA –West Lake Landfill Updates
From: Carey, Curtis
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 11:41 AM
To: Hague, Mark ; Brincks, Mike ; Peterson,
Mary ; Stoy, Alyse ; Juett, Lynn
; Vann, Bradley ; Field, Jeff

Cc: Washburn, Ben ; Sanders, LaTonya
Subject: RE: New Bill in Senate: R7 OPA –West Lake Landfill Updates
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055787
For Immediate Release
November 19, 2015
Contacts:
Missouri Members Demand Action on
West Lake Landfill
WASHINGTON, DC- Today, members of the Missouri congressional delegation,
including Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill, and Representatives Ann Wagner
and Wm. Lacy Clay, introduced legislation to transfer remediation authority over the
West Lake landfill from the Environmental Protection Agency to the Army Corps of
Engineers, putting the site in the Corps’ Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action
Program (FUSRAP).
“The EPA’s unacceptable delay in implementing a solution for the West Lake landfill has
destroyed its credibility and it is time to change course,” said Blunt. “The Corps has the
knowledge, experience, and confidence of the families living near the site. Transferring
clean up efforts to its control will help move the process forward and finally give these
families the peace of mind they deserve. No parent should have to raise their child in an
environment where they fear for their health and safety.”
McCaskill added, “The needs of this community are our top concern. We’ve heard loud
and clear that they want the West Lake site transferred to the Army Corps of Engineers’
program that oversees all other sites in St. Louis containing this World War II era
nuclear waste. This legislation is not a silver bullet, and will take far longer than we’d like
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055788
to resolve the many issues surrounding this site, but this is a concrete, positive step
forward in a process that’s been stagnant for far too long.”
The bill introduced today would not alter the current liability of potentially responsible
parties at the site nor its designation as a Superfund site.
The measure represents the latest step in the delegation’s effort to utilize the Corps’
expertise to expedite remediation at the West Lake site. In July, Blunt, McCaskill,
Wagner, and Clay sent to Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz asking the
Department of Energy to re-evaluate whether West Lake qualified for inclusion in the
Corps’ FUSRAP in light of new information regarding the source of radioactive waste at
the site.
“My constituents in the St. Louis region deserve a government where officials work
proactively on their behalf, rather than kicking the can down the road with recurring
delays and deflections,” said Wagner. “The Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action
Program (FUSRAP) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have an excellent track
record, broad support in the community and the expertise to handle a site as
complicated as the Westlake Landfill. I believe that this legislation is a crucial step in our
efforts to reach a permanent solution for the people of Missouri.”
Clay added, “Over a year ago, I called for the transfer of West Lake to the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program. This new bipartisan legislation will bring us
closer to achieving that goal.
This is a 70-year old problem and the federal government has a duty to finally do the
right thing.
I am totally committed to removing all the nuclear waste from West Lake landfill. It just
makes no sense to allow radioactive waste to remain buried in an unlined landfill, near
residential neighborhoods, schools, a hospital, the airport and the Missouri River. It’s
time to clean up West Lake landfill.”
On February 28, 2014, the members also sent to the EPA asking the agency to
contract directly with the Corps to handle remediation efforts through FUSRAP, citing
the Corps’ “expertise in this area, and the local community’s faith in the Corps’ FUSRAP
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055789
mission.” In March of 2014, the agencies~~== an agreement to work together to
build a fire break at the West Lake landfill.
Peterson,
Cc: Washburn, Ben Sanders, LaTonya
Subject: New Bill in Senate: R7 OPA –West Lake Landfill Updates
To require the Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers,
to undertake remediation oversight of the West Lake Landfill located
in Bridgeton, Missouri.
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055790
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055791

Post

2015-12-12 – EPA – West Lake Landfill – Analysis of requests to transfer authority to USACE

To:
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Hague, Mark[[email protected]]
Woolford, James
Sat 12/12/2015 8:24:55 PM
FW: WLL
I sent this and then, catching up on email, saw your note.
We argue similar points.
Let me know if I can help further.
Jim Woolford, Director
Office of Superfund Remediation & Technology Innovation
US EPA
Sent from my Windows Phone
Please excuse typos
Here are arguments from the Missouri coalition for the environment:
1) The St. Louis Army Corps of Engineers Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
must be put in charge of the site now! The Corps is right for the job because:
West Lake Landfill deserves a much needed second opinion after mistakes made by the EPA,
it removes a significant amount of influence that Republic Services and Exelon Energy currently
enjoy as a Superfund site,
the Corps has the technical expertise and track record for the safe cleanup of radioactively
contaminated sites in the St. Louis metro area,
workers are better protected and compensated at FUSRAP sites than EPA Superfund sites,
the Corps is already familiar with the site through current interagency agreements with EPA
Region 7 so the transfer will be smooth,
the Corps office is local and therefore more accessible to the community
2) MCE supports the safe removal of the radioactive wastes from the West Lake Landfill
because the EPA’s 2008 decision to “cap-and-leave” the wastes will remain a constant threat to
our drinking water, public health, and our environment. The safe removal of the illegally dumped
radioactive wastes is necessary because the West Lake Landfill:
was never designed to permanently store radioactive material,
has no liner separating the radioactive material from the groundwater,
is in the floodplain of the Missouri River,
is upstream from St. Louis regional drinking water intakes,
is in an urban area,
is vulnerable to earthquakes,
is threatened by a smoldering landfill fire or future fires,
is susceptible to tornadoes, and
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055676
is at a site never designed to temporarily or permanently store radioactive material.
+++++++=====
I have little exposure to the USACE-FUSRAP program since I went over to OSRTI.
Background. Around 1997 Congress transferred responsibility for remediating some of the
former DOE sites to the USACE. DOE and the USACE then signed a MOU defining their
respective responsibilities. The Legacy Management office at DOE has responsibility for
monitoring the sites and operating any technologies and ICs.
The USACE did get the St Louis property sites which were in reality not nearly as technically
challenging as WLL. Generally these properties had some radioactively contaminated soils as
fill. Most of the cleanup has been a relatively simple dig and haul although special precautions
were required due to the radioactivity. Most if not all if these properties/sites were on the NPL
and thus had EPA oversight from Region 7.
Interestingly, remediation work at the sites in and around St. Louis has been going on for almost
20 years. The most recent ROD was 10 yrs ago and remediation work is still going on. Not
exactly expeditious.
The challenge the USACE will have is there is an actively engaged PRP doing work. The
FUSRAP sites where the USACE has responsibility don’t typically have this element as far as I
can recall. That is, they are doing the work and not overseeing PRPs doing work. I don’t think
they are particularly well suited to perform such a task. The MCE seems to believe the USACE
can somehow ignore the PRPs. I can’t see that happening unless there is a cash out
settlement. The PRPs to date have not signaled any such interest.
I cld find 3 LFs in the USACE’s FUSRAP portfolio. At each, (the Tonawanda LF in NY,
Middlesex Muni LF in NJ and Shpack LF in Mass ) the USACE is doing the work. I could not
find any evidence of PRP involvement with the USACE .
Shpack is on the NPL abd has a separate EPA I PRP element. The USACE did excavate rad
waste there – about 50 k cubic yards. The entire site achieved CC about a year ago. Not all rad
contamination was excavated.
At Tonawanda LF, the most recent info I cld find is the USACE has issued a PP in Sept 2015
with the following preferred alternative : “targeted shallow removal and off site disposal of fusraprelated
material to address the contaminated soils in the LF OU”. The removal depth is approx 5
ft. 1000 yr post closure monitoring is also included. They propose to leave more deeply buried
waste in place. Public comment pd closes Dec 14. Remedy is estimated to cost about $12M.
They proposed a “deep excavation” alternative costing about $55M. It was not their preferred
alt. Each alternative has off site disposal.
I mention the above becz if the rationale or belief behind the legislative push for a change to the
USACE is that the LF will be excavated and all the rad/FUSRAP waste will be removed, that is a
huge leap of faith. Tonawanda is in many respects most similar to WLL.
PROS and CONS for transfer
-Pros
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055677
1) Significant public discontent with EPA. (but the allegations of mismanagement stem from
disagreement with the first ROD and that the subsequent work has not resulted in a new ROD
requiring full excavation of all the rad waste.)
2) USACE generally has good reputation in StLouis area
3). The radioactive waste is similar to FUSRAP-related materials. Some argue it is. USACE has
experience here.
4). USACE had some knowledge of site due to support on the subsurface smoldering eventbut
not the WLL site – so an easy transition is not a given
5) site has been a significant investment for R 7 – they cld redirect to other sites
-Cons
1) USACE does not have experience working with or overseeing PRPs
2). Uncertain PRP reaction- PRP has generally been cooperative with EPA. Republic owns the
LF. When the legislation was announced, their statements were in opposition citing potential for
significant delays.
3). Despite community negativity, work on both the SSI and the characterization of the WLL has
been progressing. Sorting thru the USACE role and bringing the USACE up to speed will likely
stop progress towards a new PP.
4) related to #3- there are a number of EPA enforcement instruments- AOCs and UAOs- in
place that cover WLL. Not clear how the legislation would/ could affect. What happens with
special account? Can USACE access?
5). The US (DOE) is a PRP. Negotiations have been ongoing with them and DOJ I ED.
6). Outcome/remedy could be not much different than an EPA-lead process. The work has to
go thru the same CERCLA process. Full excavation faces two significant challenges that I see :
1 – FAA concerns about bird strikes from SL airport and 2- not likely to be a cost effective
remedy under CERCLA.
There is no evidence of off site contaminated GW migration and the GW likely will be monitored
at the fenceline. If CoCs are identified, then the remedy will be to pump and treat- that will be
less costly and safer -see FAA- than full excavation. Same level of protectiveness.
Tornadoes are surface events. Assuming there is a cap of substance, it a tornado very unlikely
to have an effect. Not far away from here is the above ground (75 feet) DOE Weldon Springs
waste storage facility/disposal cell- part of a state park if memory serves. It is much more
vulnerable to tornadoes. It has, according a website., 1.5 M cubic yards of hazardous wastes.
7). I have heard DOE does not support
8). Not sure about the USACE- but I think they are not in support
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055678
9). Putting site under the USACE is one thing, will they have resources to address? Likely would
adversely affect delay other FUSRAP sites if no more funding.
Jim Woolford, Director
Office of Superfund Remediation & Technology Innovation
US EPA
Sent from my Windows Phone
Please excuse typos
Can you give me your thoughts on this question? I frankly can make an argument both ways
Mathy Stanislaus
USEP A Assistant Administrator
Begin forwarded message:
From: “Distefano, Nichole”
Date: December 11,2015 at 7:51:42 PM EST
To: “Stanislaus, Mathy” “Hague, Mark”
Subject: WLL
Mathy and Mark
I am going to raise the WLL issue with Gina via email.
I need to know from you both how strongly you feel about her weighing in on this. There
may be a couple of things she can try to do if we want to suggest she try to stop it – though
it may not work. She also may come to that conclusion on her own. That said, I need to
know from you all what you would suggest.
She gets back on Sunday so she may want to discuss with us when she lands.
Sent from my iPhone
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0055679

Post

2014-05-01 – EPA – USACE – West Lake Landfill – Haul Road Information

To: Tapia, Cecilia[[email protected]]
Cc:
From:
Field, Jeff[[email protected]]; Kiefer, Robyn V NWK[[email protected]]
Cotner, Sharon R MVS
Sent: Thur 5/1/2014 2:17:49 PM
Subject: RE: Haul Roads Information (UNCLASSIFIED)
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE
Dear Cecilia:
I’m going to assume that you are looking for information regarding USAGE sampling of haul roads
between Latty & Westlake (since that seems to be the topic of the day.)
USAGE has sampled and remediated haul roads between SLAPS and HISS since the completion of the
2005 ROD. These roads are Pershall Road, Latty Ave, Hazelwood Ave, a small stretch of Lindbergh,
Frost, Banshee and McDonnell Blvd.
USAGE never sampled the roads from Latty to Westlake Landfill.
The sampling mentioned in the 2005 was completed by DOE prior to USAGE assignment to FUSRAP in
1997. It was only mentioned in the ROD in order to give a full picture of the sampling completed to date in
the area. (In hindsight perhaps it should not have been mentioned.)
The sampling completed by DOE was briefly mentioned in a report completed by DOE. We are trying to
find some sort of document with the actual sample results but are having no success. (At this point I am
not sure we even have the data since the area would be outside the scope of FUSRAP as Westlake was
not a FUSRAP project at the time of the transfer of the program from DOE.)
If we find anything more, we will let you and the State know.
(Also- as a side thought, someone here recalls MDNR sampling these roads in the 2003-2004 timeframe.
You may wish to touch base with them.)
I hope this helps.
Sincerely,
Sharon Cotner
—–Original Message—–
From: Tapia, Cecilia [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2014 4:16PM
To: Cotner, Sharon R MVS
Cc: Field, Jeff
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Haul Roads Information
Is there any other haul road information other than the work USAGE completed that resulted in the 2005
ROD?
Thanks
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058973
Cecilias Microsoft Outlook Signature large font
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058974

Post

2014-05-14 – EPA – West Lake Landfill – Why is EPA not testing drainage ditches at BMAC

To:
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Aboussie, Lou[[email protected]]
Sanders, LaTonya
Wed 5/14/2014 2:47:12 PM
RE: Westlake
Good Morning Lou,
EPA has no validated information indicating the need to screen for radiation outside of the West Lake
Landfill site. We are undertaking a screening of BMAC to allay public concerns at that heavily used
recreation complex. The screening methods EPA will use there have been employed at many sites
across the country and are supported by research and documented procedures. Soil sampling will also
be performed at BMAC to confirm the screening results. In their 2005 Record of Decision the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers cited extensive Department of Energy sampling of the haul roads. None of the
samples collected exhibited radionuclide concentrations exceeding the proposed surface and subsurface
soil remediation goals identified in the ROD. Soil sampling conducted by MDNR in 2005 in the ditches
and shoulders along Boenker Lane and Taussig Road for radium, thorium and uranium did not identify
any high concentrations of these radionuclides. With regard to screening haul roads, they remain under
the purview of the USAGE FUSRAP program.
—–Original Message—–
From: Aboussie, Lou [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 6:01 PM
To: Sanders, LaTonya
Subject: Re: Westlake
Just curious, does not have to be formal. Thx
—– Original Message —–
From: Sanders, LaTonya [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 06:46PM
To: Aboussie, Lou
Subject: RE: Westlake
Hi Lou,
Working on a response.
—–Original Message—–
From: Aboussie, Lou [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Saturday, May 10, 2014 8:35AM
To: Sanders, LaTonya
Subject: Westlake
Why are the drainage ditches at BMAC not going to be tested? LA
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058472

Post

2013-03-27 – EPA – WEST LAKE LANDFILL BRIDGETON, MISSOURI – Questions and Answers

WEST LAKE LANDFILL
BRIDGETON, MISSOURI
QUESTION: Why hasn’t EPA proposed to excavate the radiological waste at West Lake
Landfill, to be consistent with the ongoing excavation of similar radiological waste at the nearby
St. Louis Airport sites (SLAPS)?
ANSWER:
While the wastes are similar at both sites, the pathways for people to be exposed to the material
at West Lake and SLAPS are very different
West Lake is fenced to prevent access, and the groundwater beneath the site is not being used for
drinking water. There are no current exposures to people.
The radiological waste at SLAPS is mainly at the surface along roads where the public could be
exposed.
Existing risk assessments indicate that the West Lake waste can be safely managed by capping in
place as selected in the 2008 Record of Decision. However, due to extensive public interest, EPA
is currently re-evaluating the ROD remedy and several excavation remedies in more detail.
BACKGROUND:
• EPA completed a Supplemental Feasibility Study in 2011 that re-evaluated the Record of
Decision remedy of cap-in-place as well as full excavation of the radiological waste with offsite
or on-site disposal.
• Region 7 presented the results of the SFS to the National Remedy Review Board as an “early
consultation” in February 2012, and the NRRB comments from this consultation resulted in
additional evaluations. The additional evaluations, including an evaluation of a partial
excavation alternative, are in work now by the potentially responsible parties and will result
in an addendum to the SFS report.
• The Lambert-St. Louis Airport Authority has expressed considerable interest in the remedy
to be selected, and has stated in writing that it views excavation of landfill waste so close to
the airport to constitute a bird strike hazard to aircraft.
• Questions received on this and related issues from Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt,
Reps. William Lacy Clay
Dan Gravatt, 913-551-7324
Karl Brooks, 913-551-7006 3/27/2013
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058493
QUESTION: What is EPA doing about the landfill fire or “subsurface smoldering event” at
West Lake?
ANSWER:
• The landfill fire at West Lake is occurring underground in a non-radiological waste disposal
cell at the site which is permitted by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources
(MDNR). As the sole regulatory authority for this waste disposal cell, MDNR is responsible
for responding to the landfill fire.
• EPA and MDNR communicate regularly on the status of the fire and the PRP’s to contain
and put the fire out.
BACKGROUND:
• The landfill fire was first discovered in December 2010 and reported to MDNR and the EPA.
• The landfill fire began to receive extensive press coverage in late 2012 when odors from the
fire increased and began to generate complaints from local residents and businesses.
• The landfill fire area is more than 1,000 feet from the nearest area of radiological waste.
• Questions received on this and related issues from Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt,
Reps. William Lacy Clay and Ann Wagner.
RESOURCES:
The site is PRP-lead, meaning that the PRPs (including the U.S. Department of Energy) are
paying for the additional studies and site work, and are reimbursing EPA staff for its time in
overseeing the work.
Dan Gravatt, 913-551-7324
Karl Brooks, 913-551-7006 3/27/2013
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058494

Post

2015-07-21 – EPA – West Lake Landfill – Conference call with USACE

To: Stoy, Alyse[[email protected]]; Juett, Lynn[[email protected]]
Cc: Field, Jeff[[email protected]]; Jackson, Robert W.[[email protected]]; Peterson,
Mary[[email protected]]; Sanders, LaTonya[[email protected]]; Washburn,
Ben[[email protected]]; Carey, Curtis[[email protected]]; Whitley,
Christopher[Wh itley. [email protected] .gov]
From: Vann, Bradley
Sent: Tue 7/21/2015 2:59:50 PM
Subject: RE: West Lake Landfill
From: Vann, Bradley
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 9:47AM
To: Stoy, Alyse; Juett, Lynn
Cc: Field, Jeff; Jackson, Robert W.; Peterson, Mary; Sanders, LaTonya; Washburn, Ben; Carey,
Curtis; Whitley, Christopher
Subject: RE: West Lake Landfill
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058775
From: Stoy, Alyse
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 9:40AM
To: Vann, Bradley; Juett, Lynn
Subject: Fwd: West Lake Landfill
Brad/Lynn- I just sent an email to Steven that a call tomorrow would be best. I’ve asked him to
send me some times that work for them. Can you two figure out who should be on this call from
our end?
Sent from my iPhone
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058776
Begin forwarded message:
From: “Miller, Steven (GC)”
Date: July 21,2015 at 9:19:02 AM CDT
Cc: “‘Vann, Bradley”‘
Subject: RE: West Lake Landfill
From: Stoy, Alyse I.!Il§W1Q:J;ili;~~~~!MQ’YJ
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 11:18 AM
To: Miller, Steven (GC); ·'”-==’-‘=~-====~· ”–‘-‘=========:.;;_,
Cc: Vann, Bradley
Subject: RE: West Lake Landfill
Hi Steven/Phil-
Our RPM is still getting questions about a DOE point of contact for the West Lake
CAG. Do you have a public affairs POC that we can forward along? Thanks!
Alyse Stoy
Assoc. Deputy Regional Counsel for Enforcement
Office of Regional Counsel
U.S. EPA Region 7
(913) 551-7826 phone
(816) 807-3271 cell
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058777
From: Stoy, Alyse
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 10:03 AM
To:~~~~~~~~*·~~~,~~~~~~~~~~-
Subject: West Lake Landfill
Hi Steven/Phil-
Quick question for you. The West Lake CAG (community advisory group) has
asked EPA the name of a DOE contact person. I don’t know the specifics of what
the community is wanting to contact DOE about, but will defer to you who the
appropriate contact would be. Let me know and we are happy to pass this
information along to the CAG.
Thanks, Alyse
Alyse Stay
Assoc. Deputy Regional Counsel for Enforcement
Office of Regional Counsel
U.S. EPA Region 7
(913) 551-7826 phone
(816) 807-3271 cell
WLLFOIA4312- 001 – 0058778

Post

2015-12-21 – USACE – Suggestion on WSJ response

From: Vann, Bradley
To: Mahler, Tom; Juett, Lynn
Cc: Hooper, Charles A.; Peterson, Mary
Subject: RE: Suggestion on WSJ response
Date: Monday, December 21, 2015 4:21:12 PM
Tom, I agree on sharing but certainly we would craft our own response. We’ve been sharing media
items related to West Lake or with the occasional overlap from FUSRAP with the Corps since their
IAs began (IB and remedy). It’s always for their awareness and ours to ensure consistency in
information. Especially since Robyn or Paul are often in the public, such as at CAG meetings
answering questions in sidebar discussions. Wouldn’t see this as an issue here any differently. If the
information needs to go to St. Louis, Robyn can also forward it on to Susan Adams in St. Louis.
Bradley Vann – Remedial Project Manager
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Superfund Division
Missouri/Kansas Remedial Branch
11201 Renner Blvd.
Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 913-551-7611
Fax: 913-551-9611
Cell: 816-714-0331
From: Mahler, Tom
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2015 3:44 PM
To: Juett, Lynn
Cc: Vann, Bradley ; Hooper, Charles A. ;
Peterson, Mary
Subject: Suggestion on WSJ response
I just wanted to let you all know that I talked to Jough Donakowski with the Kansas City USACE and
he confirmed to me that there is no clean up level established for lead 210 for the FUSRAP sites. He
even pulled up one of the St. Louis RODs to confirm.
I suggest that we forward the latest set of questions to Robyn and Jough just for their awareness. Do
we have a contact with the St. Louis USACE group. We might want to forward to that person as well.
I’m not saying that we ask them to response but I think they should know what this reporter is
saying.
Any thoughts?
Tom

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