2016-08-22 – NRC – Jocassee Dam – Flooding Review Documents – ML16236A018

2016-08-22-nrc-jocassee-dam-flooding-review-documents-ml16236a018

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Criscione, Lawrence
From: Cook, Christopher
Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 7:35 AM
To: Criscione, Lawrence; Salley, MarkHenry; Peters, Sean
Cc: Rivera-Varona, Aida; Harvey, Brad; Correia, Richard
Subject: RE: response: Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
Attachments: R2.1_SA_Template_FINAL_ML13218A150.pdf
Larry,
The file you attached is a draft job aid that Mark McBride created (he called it a Style Sheet), but he did not
finish it before he retired. No one has worked on the job aid since he retired.
Our staff assessment template is ML13218A150 (attached) and was completed in September 2013. Please
note that the template is a non-public document in ADAMS.
Since 2014, we have issued approximately 22 staff assessments. Over the years, our staff assessments have
evolved as a result of Commission direction and as we have tried to improve our products. For example, all
staff assessments issued in 2016 were written after issuance of an Interim Staff Letter (ISR) to the licensee (for
example, here’s Salem Generating Station’s ISR Letter: ML15244B266). In 2013 and when the template was
finished, the concept of an ISR did not exist. Therefore, if you compare our most recent staff assessment to the
template, you will see that our staff assessments generally follow the 2013 template. However, we also
evolved as the process changed in response to Commission direction plus we’re always trying to improve.
In summary, the best guidance I can provide is a reference to our most recent staff assessments plus the
attached 2013 template.
Regards,
Chris
From: Criscione, Lawrence
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2016 12:56 PM
To: Cook, Christopher ; Salley, MarkHenry ; Peters, Sean

Cc: Rivera‐Varona, Aida ; Harvey, Brad ; Correia, Richard

Subject: RE: response: Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
Chris,
I got the document from an NRO colleague who received it from Mark McBride in 2015.
I’m reviewing the Chairman’s response to the Office of Special Counsel’s referral regarding my disclosure on
the NRC’s handling of flooding hazards.
The flooding reviews are being conducted as “staff assessments” vice as “safety evaluations”. Safety
evaluations are handled under LIC-101. I’m trying to determine what the guidance is for “staff assessments”.
The purpose of my questions to you are two-fold:
1. To find out if the attached document is the only guidance there is for conducting staff assessments and,
if there is other guidance, to find out where it is at so I can review it.
2. To find a clean copy of the attached document so that I can reference it in my comments on the
Chairman’s response to the Office of Special Counsel.
So, that being said:
 Do you know of any guidance your staff uses when conducting their staff assessments of the flooding
reviews (other than the attached document)?
 Do you know if the attached version is in ADAMS and—if not—can you tell me who the current
document owner is and where I can find the latest version of the document?
Thanks,
Larry
573-230-3959
From: Cook, Christopher
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2016 12:32 PM
To: Criscione, Lawrence ; Salley, MarkHenry ; Peters, Sean

Cc: Rivera‐Varona, Aida ; Harvey, Brad
Subject: response: Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
Larry,
Where did you find this document? I think it was produced as a job aid for my branch and it lives out on the
JLD SharePt site, but I’m not sure. Can you also let me know the purpose for your question?
I’m also trying to understand the nexus between your 3 questions, our other DRA activities (primarily in
DRA/FXHAB), and what you’re trying to accomplish.
I’ve included Mark Salley and Sean Peters in case they prefer to respond instead.
Thanks,
Chris
Christopher B. Cook, Ph.D., P.E.
Chief, Hydrology and Meteorology Branch 1
US NRC, Office of New Reactors
(301) 415‐6397
Christopher.Cook@nrc.gov
From: Criscione, Lawrence
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2016 11:47 AM
To: Cook, Christopher
Cc: Rivera‐Varona, Aida ; Harvey, Brad
Subject: RE: Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
Chris,
I was told Aida is out sick today and it looks like she is on vacation next week. Mark McBride has apparently
retired.
I am attempting to find the guidance used by the NRC staff to conduct the “Staff Assessments” of the flooding
reviews. I just spoke with Brad Harvey and he doesn’t think we have any such guidance—other than the outof-
date style guide attached to this email.
Do you know of any guidance that your staff uses when conducting their staff assessments of the flooding
reviews? Do you know if the attached document is in ADAMS? If not, can you tell me who the current
document owner is and where I can find the latest version of the document?
Thank you,
Larry
Lawrence S. Criscione
573-230-3959
From: Criscione, Lawrence
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2016 11:18 AM
To: Rivera‐Varona, Aida
Subject: Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
Aida,
The person listed as the owner of the attached document (Mark McBride) no longer works for the NRC but he
was in your branch. Do you know where the attached document is located? Is it in ADAMS? Is it possible for
me to get the most current revision (i.e. one without unaccepted changes)?
I am trying to find guidance on conducting Staff Assessments. Other than this document, where is the
guidance for conducting a Staff Assessment?
Thanks,
Larry
Lawrence S. Criscione
Reliability & Risk Engineer
RES/DRA/HFRB
T10‐B44
(573) 230‐3959
Style Sheet for JLD Flooding Review Documents
SharePoint Version 12.0 October 8, 2015
Mark McBride NRC/NRO/DSEA/RHM2
Contents
1.0 PURPOSE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 42
2.0 OTHER SOURCES OF EDITORIAL GUIDANCE …………………………………………………… 53
3.0 Basic Principles …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 64
3.1 Consistency …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 64
3.2 Conclusions and Safety Findings ……………………………………………………………………… 64
3.3 One-Name Rule ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 64
3.4 Plain Language ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 64
3.5 Organizing with Paragraphs …………………………………………………………………………….. 64
3.6 Verb Tenses ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 75
3.7 Vertical Datums ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 75
3.8 Distributing the Style Sheet to Contractors …………………………………………………………. 85
4.0 DEFINITIONS AND USAGE ……………………………………………………………………………….. 97
5.0 FORMATTING REPORTS ………………………………………………………………………………. 1210
5.1 Templates ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1210
5.2 Text Formatting ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1210
5.3 Section Headings ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 1512
5.4 Tables and Figures ……………………………………………………………………………………… 1613
5.4.1 Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1613
5.4.1.1 Placement of Tables………………………………………………………………………………………. 1814
5.4.1.2 Table Numbering …………………………………………………………………………………………… 1915
5.4.1.3 Table Captions ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1915
5.4.1.4 Formatting Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………. 1915
5.4.1.5 Table Cell Values ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2016
5.4.1.6 Notes to Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2016
5.4.2 Figures ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2116
5.4.2.1 Formatting and Placing Figures ………………………………………………………………………. 2117
5.4.2.2 Map Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2519
6.0 References and Citations ………………………………………………………………………………… 2620
6.1 General Notes About References ………………………………………………………………….. 2620
6.1.1 What to Cite and Reference …………………………………………………………………… 2620
6.1.2 Calculation Packages and Similar Documents ………………………………………….. 2620
6.1.3 Responsibilities for Documents and References ……………………………………….. 2721
6.2 References List …………………………………………………………………………………………… 2721
6.2.1 References to Publications in General …………………………………………………….. 2721
6.2.2 References to NRC Documents ……………………………………………………………… 2923
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6.2.3 References to E-mails …………………………………………………………………………… 2923
6.2.4 References to Correspondence ……………………………………………………………… 3024
6.2.5 References to RAIs ………………………………………………………………………………. 3124
6.2.6 References to Web Pages and Web Sites ……………………………………………….. 3124
6.2.7 References to Software …………………………………………………………………………. 3226
6.2.8 Cross-References Within Documents ……………………………………………………… 3327
6.2.9 Authorship …………………………………………………………………………………………… 3427
6.3 Citing References in Text …………………………………………………………………………….. 3528
6.4 ADAMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3529
6.4.1 Multi-Document References in ADAMS …………………………………………………… 3629
6.4.2 ADAMS References to Complex Documents ……………………………………………. 3629
7.0 UNITS OF MEASURE …………………………………………………………………………………….. 3831
7.1 Abbreviations ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 3831
7.2 Presenting Numerical Values ……………………………………………………………………….. 4033
7.2.1 Primary Units and Reported Values ………………………………………………………… 4033
7.2.2 Dual Units ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 4033
7.2.3 Exceptions and Special Cases ……………………………………………………………….. 4033
7.3 Conversion Factors …………………………………………………………………………………….. 4134
7.4 Rounding of Converted Measurements ………………………………………………………….. 4336
7.4.1 Determining the Number of Significant Digits ……………………………………………. 4336
7.4.1.1 Exact Primary Values …………………………………………………………………………………….. 4336
7.4.1.2 Approximate Values ………………………………………………………………………………………. 4437
7.4.2 Rounding Rules ……………………………………………………………………………………. 4437
7.5 Hyphenation of Values with Units ………………………………………………………………….. 4437
8.0 REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4538
9.0 EXAMPLES OF REFERENCES TO DOCUMENTS ……………………………………………. 4639
9.1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Documents and Publications …………………… 4639
9.2 Codes and Standards ………………………………………………………………………………….. 4840
Licensee and Applicant Documents …………………………………………………………………….. 4840
9.3 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4840
9.4 Other References ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 4941
1.0 PURPOSE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
2.0 OTHER SOURCES OF EDITORIAL GUIDANCE …………………………………………………….. 3
3.0 Basic Principles …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
3.1 Consistency …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
3.2 Conclusions and Safety Findings ……………………………………………………………………….. 4
3.3 One-Name Rule ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
3.4 Plain Language ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
3.5 Organizing with Paragraphs ………………………………………………………………………………. 4
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3.6 Verb Tenses ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
3.7 Vertical Datums ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
3.8 Distributing the Style Sheet to Contractors …………………………………………………………… 5
4.0 DEFINITIONS AND USAGE …………………………………………………………………………………. 7
5.0 FORMATTING REPORTS ……………………………………………………………………………………. 9
5.1 Templates ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
5.2 Text Formatting ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
5.3 Section Headings …………………………………………………………………………………………… 11
5.4 Tables and Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………. 12
5.4.1 Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
5.4.1.1 Placement of Tables………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
5.4.1.2 Table Numbering ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
5.4.1.3 Table Captions …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
5.4.1.4 Formatting Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14
5.4.1.5 Table Cell Values ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
5.4.1.6 Notes to Tables ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
5.4.2 Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
5.4.2.1 Formatting and Placing Figures ………………………………………………………………………….. 15
5.4.2.2 Map Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18
6.0 References and Citations ……………………………………………………………………………………. 19
6.1 General Notes About References ……………………………………………………………………… 19
6.1.1 What to Cite and Reference ………………………………………………………………………. 19
6.1.2 Calculation Packages and Similar Documents ……………………………………………… 19
6.1.3 Responsibilities for Documents and References …………………………………………… 20
6.2 References List ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20
6.2.1 References to Publications in General ………………………………………………………… 20
6.2.2 References to NRC Documents …………………………………………………………………. 22
6.2.3 References to E-mails ………………………………………………………………………………. 22
6.2.4 References to Correspondence …………………………………………………………………. 23
6.2.5 References to RAIs ………………………………………………………………………………….. 23
6.2.6 References to Web Pages and Web Sites …………………………………………………… 23
6.2.7 References to Software …………………………………………………………………………….. 25
6.2.8 Cross-References Within Documents …………………………………………………………. 25
6.2.9 Authorship ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 26
6.3 Citing References in Text ………………………………………………………………………………… 27
6.4 ADAMS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
6.4.1 Multi-Document References in ADAMS ………………………………………………………. 27
6.4.2 ADAMS References to Complex Documents ……………………………………………….. 28
7.0 UNITS OF MEASURE ………………………………………………………………………………………… 29
7.1 Abbreviations …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
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7.2 Presenting Numerical Values …………………………………………………………………………… 31
7.2.1 Primary Units and Reported Values ……………………………………………………………. 31
7.2.2 Dual Units ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31
7.2.3 Exceptions and Special Cases …………………………………………………………………… 31
7.3 Conversion Factors ………………………………………………………………………………………… 32
7.4 Rounding of Converted Measurements ……………………………………………………………… 34
7.4.1 Determining the Number of Significant Digits ……………………………………………….. 34
7.4.1.1 Exact Primary Values ………………………………………………………………………………………… 34
7.4.1.2 Approximate Values ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
7.4.2 Rounding Rules ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 35
7.5 Hyphenation of Values with Units ……………………………………………………………………… 35
8.0 REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36
9.0 EXAMPLES OF REFERENCES TO DOCUMENTS ……………………………………………….. 37
9.1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Documents and Publications ……………………… 37
9.2 Codes and Standards ……………………………………………………………………………………… 38
9.3 Other References …………………………………………………………………………………………… 38
1.0 PURPOSE
This Style Sheet addresses questions that occur when NRC staff prepares flooding-related
documents for the Japan Lessons Learned Project Division (JLD) in response to the “50.54(f)
letter” (NRC, 2010). . These documents include:
 Staff Assessments of licensee Flood Hazard Reevaluation Reports that discuss flood
mechanisms (Recommendation 2.1)
 Staff Assessments of interim actions (Recommendation 2.1)
 Staff Assessments of integrated assessments (Recommendation 2.1)
 Staff Assessments related to flooding walkdown reports (Recommendation 2.3)
The editors of these reports have prepared this Style Sheet to aid in preparing these reports. .
Because from 300 to 400 of these reports are expected, we believe it necessary to address
questions that are likely to arise in many or most reports so they do not have to be addressed
repeatedly. . Within reasonable limits, we also want to standardize report format and language.
This Style Sheet is intended to be used together with document templates. . These are
provided as foundations to assist staff in preparing flood-related documents. . They contain the
basic structure of the document, organized in numbered sections; boilerplate language to be
used with little or no change; sample language that may be accepted, modified, or deleted;
spaces to be filled with specific values or text; and guidance to authors and reviewers. .
The Style Sheet discusses other sources of editorial guidance, describes report formats,
standardizes certain choices of language, prescribes a standard form of source reference and
citation, provides standard references for documents frequently cited in these reports, and
addresses other common problems. .
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The Style Sheet assumes use of Microsoft Word 20130 word processing software.
2.0 OTHER SOURCES OF EDITORIAL GUIDANCE
This Style Sheet supplements other, more complete sources of editorial guidance that should be
consulted as needed. .
The basic reference for government writing is the U.S. . Government Printing Office Style
Manual (USGPO, 2008). . Because it is aimed at printers rather than writers, it does not cover
all issues of interest here, and must be supplemented by other guidance. . It is particularly
useful, however, for details such as abbreviations, capitalization, and compounding.
The NRC Editorial Style Guide (NRC, 2009) is the basic source for NRC writing. . It partly
follows guidance from the U.S. . Government Printing Office Style Manual, but differs in some
details.
Some items in this Style Sheet reiterate guidance from the NRC Editorial Style Guide. . Others
identify a preferred alternative among those presented there, or provide guidance on matters
not covered. . In particular, the NRC Editorial Style Guide discusses several systems of
reference and citation. . This Style Sheet settles on one, with minor modification, in the interest
of avoiding endless discussion.
The following other sources are preferred:
 For spelling, the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary (Merriam-Webster, 2007).
 In matters of style, the Chicago Manual of Style (University of Chicago Press, 2010).
 In matters of usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage (Garner, 2009).
Other sources of guidance for writers and editors are listed in Section 8.0, “, “Recommended
Editorial References.”
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3.0 BASIC PRINCIPLES
3.1 Consistency
Whatever you do, be consistent. . Consistency is often more important than following particular
practices.
3.2 Conclusions and Safety Findings
If conclusions to be included in reports are specified in the report template, use the exact
language in the template as far as possible, and do not state any other conclusions. . In
particular, avoid stating safety findings. .
3.3 One-Name Rule
Always call things by the same name. . Do not, for example, refer in one place in the report to
the “Pequot Dam” and somewhere else to the “Upper Dam,” if these are the same dam. . Be
clear what you are talking about. . If the licensee’s document uses multiple names (and some
do), mention the multiple names in your report, but otherwise use only one name.
3.4 Plain Language
Use plain language wherever possible. . This is actually the law, as enacted in the Plain Writing
Act of 2010.1 The purpose of this law is “to improve the effectiveness and accountability of
Federal agencies to the public by promoting clear Government communication that the public
can understand and use.”
The NRC Editorial Style Guide, Section 7, provides NRC-specific guidance on how to write in
plain language. . The Federal Plain Language Guidelines (PLAIN, 2011) also provides clear,
readable guidance.
Some points particularly relevant to reports described in this Style Sheet are:
 Write in the active voice. . Write “the licensee placed sandbags” rather than “sandbags
were placed by the licensee.”
 Use plain words (e.g. . “state” instead of “indicate,” “use” instead of “utilize”).
 Use specific words rather than general (e.g. . “temperature measurements” or “water
levels” rather than “data” or “values.”)
 Be careful of about using repeating the same word multiple times iin a sentence (e.g. .
“the guidance provided guidance…” or “Section 3.2 describes the licensee’s
description…”). .
 Use fewer, more direct words (e.g. . “by” instead of “no later than,” or “analyze” instead
of “perform an analysis”).
3.5 Organizing with Paragraphs
Keep paragraphs relatively short. . Focus each paragraph on a single topic, and make clear
what that topic is. . If in doubt, make paragraphs short rather than long. .
1 Plain Writing Act of 2010, Pub. L. No. 111-274, 124 Stat. 2861 (2010).
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Keep the discussion of licensee actions separate from the discussion of staff actions by placing
them in different paragraphs. . Combining these discussions can make them hard to follow. .
Make clear early in the paragraph whether licensee or staff actions are being discussed. .
3.6 Verb Tenses
Use the present and past tenses to clarify the sequence of events and decisions discussed in
the report.
Use the present tense to describe:
 Describe the licensee’s actions in the past tense (“the licensee stated,” not “the licensee
states”)., but…
 Describe aStatements or informationctions attributed to NRC reports, licensee reports,
or other technical reports in the present tense (“Tthe FHRR licensee states …,” not “the
The FHRR licensee stated …”) (“The USGS maps show that the channel …).
 Describe tThe resolution of a request for additional information n( RAI) is the present
tense (“Tthe staff accepts that the revised analysis in RAI 867 resolves…”).
 Describe NRC staff decisions or conclusions in the present tense (“Tthe staff concludes
that …”).
Use the past tense to describe:
 Describe the liLicensee’s actionsactivities in the past tense (“tThe licensee
statedreinforced, …”” not “tThe licensee statesreinforces …”)., but…
 Describe NRC staff review activities in the past tense (“tThe staff conducted confirmatory
modeling.”)) (”In RAI 867, NRC staff requested …”) (“Staff concluded that the discussion
was insufficient.”).
 Describe NRC staff decisions or conclusions in the present tense (“the staff concludes”).
 Discussing the reasons for issuing a request for additional information (RAI), or actions
taken to issue the RAI, in the past tense (“the staff reviewed,” “the staff concluded that
the discussion was insufficient,” ”in RAI 867 the staff asked,”) .
 Describe the resolution of an RAI is the present tense (“the staff accepts that the revised
analysis in RAI 867 resolves”).
3.7 Vertical Datums
Clearly reference every elevation value to its vertical datum.
 The datum may be added after each elevation, for example, 859.36 ft (261.93 m)
NAVD88. .
 If only one datum is used for most elevations, this datum may be identified once, early in
the report, for example by inserting a statement similar to “All elevations in this
document are based on the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD29) unless
otherwise stated.”
 For conciseness in tables, the datum may be specified in the heading of a column
containing elevation values, and then omitted from the values in the table cells.
 If multiple datums are used, provide a table showing the elevation relations among the
different datums. .
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 If the licensee refers to “msl” (mean sea level) as the datum, this may be repeated in
NRC reports in the interest of avoiding further confusion. . Identify the actual datum
used by inserting a statement similar to “Elevations in the Flooding Hazard Reevaluation
Report are stated as mean sea level (msl). . All msl elevations are based on the
National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD29).”.”
 If “msl” is used, it is not capitalized, i.e. . not “MSL” even if so presented in the licensee
report.
3.8 Distributing the Style Sheet to Contractors
This Style Sheet and the Short Style Sheet are used by NRC contractors as well as NRC staff. .
If contractors do not have access to NRC’s SharePoint system, copies of the Template, Style
Sheet, and Short Style Sheet must be sent to them. Some features in these guidances are to
assist staff in developing them, and are not useful to contractors. .
The following procedure is suggested:
 Download a working copy from SharePoint to a location outside SharePoint. .
 In the working copy, check the SharePoint version number and date in the title on the
first page to make sure they agree with the version downloaded from SharePoint. . This
information is useful in discussions with contractors. . (In the Template, this information
is in a text box that is deleted from the final Staff Assessment.)
 Delete the codes for date, page numbers, and filename in the footer.
 Update the Table of Contents, if present.
 Accept all changes
 Delete all comments.
 E-mail the working copy to the contractor, or put it into the contractor’s EARRTH system.
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4.0 DEFINITIONS AND USAGE
Abbreviations SpellAbbreviations Spell out abbreviations the first time they are used in a report,
and if the report is long or complex, the first time used in a section. . Most abbreviations will be
acronyms or initialisms, but be alert for other kinds that may be present. . For units of measure,
see below under “Units and Conversion.”
Action Item SeeItem See Open Item (the preferred term).
Applicant DoApplicant Do not refer to the “applicant” in JLD flooding reports. . We are dealing
here with operating reactors, which have licensees.
Cross Section NotSection Not hyphenated, two words.
Dataset OneDataset One word; not “data set”.
Design Basis (and Beyond-Design-Basis, Current Design Basis) Do not hyphenate when used
as nouns, as in “The current design basis does not include tsunamis.” Hyphenate when used as
adjectives before the noun, for example: “Only a beyond-design-basis flood would affect the
switchyard.” Omit hyphens when used as adjectives after the noun, as in “The 1998 flood was
beyond design basis.”
Document Names – Capitalization CapitalizeCapitalization Capitalize the names of documents
of primary interest, for example Staff Assessment Report, Walkdown Report, and Integrated
Assessment. . Do not capitalize references to the corresponding activities (as opposed to
documents), for example, “An integrated assessment is not necessarywas not conducted
because …”
Cross Section Not hyphenated, two words.
Dataset One word; not “data set”.
Geographic Names IfNames If a conflict arises about the name of a geographic feature, use the
name established by the U.S. . Board on Geographic Names (http://geonames.usgs.gov). .
The Board is, by law, the final authority on the geographic names to be used in federal agency
reports. . Identify local and other variant names in text or footnotes.
Hazard and Risk InRisk In the various JLD flood hazard reports, we generally discuss hazard
rather than risk. . Use “hazard” as a general term to refer to conditions that may cause damage
to facilities, and when discussing their probability of occurrence. . Use “risk” only in reference to
formal risk analysis, where risk is defined as the product of the probability of occurrence of a
hazard and the magnitude of the resulting damage. .
Flood Hazard AHazard A flood hazard is a flooding condition that could cause damage to a
facility. . Flood hazard is a general term that covers all damage mechanisms related to flooding.
.
A flood hazard is not the same as a flood level. . Licensee reports sometimes refer to flood
hazard in connection with a flood elevation in feet above datum. . However, possible damage
mechanisms include not only the stillwater flood elevation, but also wave height, wave runup,
the dynamic effects of debris carried by the flood, and deposition of sediment. . Because “flood
hazard” is a general term, hazard should not be expressed as a flood elevation, even though
specific damage mechanisms may be discussed in terms of elevation. . Reserve “flood hazard”
for general discussions, and refer to “flood level” or “flood elevation” when discussing levels or
elevations of flood effects, either measured or calculated.
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Floodwater OneFloodwater One word; not “flood water”. .
Flowpath OneFlowpath One word, not “flow path”.
Hazards Identification BecauseIdentification Because our reports may discuss more than one
kind of hazard, identify the kind of hazard being discussed if this is not obvious. . Examples are
flood hazard, dam failure hazard, and seismic hazard.
Japan Lessons Learned Division doesDivision does not have a hyphen, but the former Japan
Lessons-Learned Directorate does have a hyphen.
Licensee DoLicensee Do not capitalize “licensee.” Do not refer to a licensee as an “applicant.”
Licensee as a Source WhenSource When citing a source of information, reference a specific
document (such as the FHRR) rather than giving “the licensee” as the source. . For example,
say “The dike crest elevation is 235.50 ft (Duke, 2013) …” rather than “The licensee stated that
the dike crest elevation is 235.50 ft …”.”
Licensing Basis Treat as for Design Basis.
Makeup NotMakeup Not make-up, as in “makeup water.”
N/A, NA AvoidNA Avoid these abbreviations, which may mean either Not Applicable or Not
Available. . Wherever possible spell out the meaning intended, in particular in table cells. . If an
abbreviation is unavoidable, include a note explaining what is meant.
NRC vs USNRC UseUSNRC Use NRC as the abbreviation, not USNRC.
Offsite NotOffsite Not off-site.
Open Item NotItem Not “Action item,” referring to future activities to be carried out during the
Integrated Assessment.
Orthophotograph NotOrthophotograph Not ortho-photograph
Quotation Marks and Punctuation Place commas and periods inside closing quotation marks
unless the material quoted is a character string (such as a computer input value) that must be
represented exactly. . See the Chicago Manual of Style, Sections 6.9, 6–10, and 7.75, for
further guidance.
Reevaluate, Reevaluation DoReevaluation Do not hyphenate, i.e. . not re-evaluate, or reevaluation.
Request for additional information Doinformation Do not capitalize when spelled out. .
Revision CapitalizeRevision Capitalize and do not abbreviate when referring to a specific
revision, e.g. . Revision 5.
Runup OneRunup One word (if a noun), not hyphenated, if used as a noun or adjective. . “Run
up” is a the verb.
Section WhenSection When citing a section of a document, capitalize and do not abbreviate
“section,” e.g. . “Storm surge effects are described in the FHRR, Section 3.5.” Do not capitalize
or abbreviate when referring to sections generally, e.g. “This report does not contain a separate
section on tsunamis.”
Staff WhenStaff When referring to NRC personnel, “staff” is not capitalized, and is singular, not
plural. . For example, “During its review, staff is evaluateding RAIs as well as the FHRR.” The
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word “staff” alone is generally enough, but “the staff” and “NRC staff” may be used as well. .
“NRC staff” may be preferred in the first reference to staff in a section or paragraph. .
Stillwater DoStillwater Do not hyphenate, i.e. . not “still-water,” either as a noun or an adjective.
Subbasin DoSubbasin Do hot hyphenate, i.e. . not not “sub-basin,” either as a noun or an
adjective.
Sunny-Day Hyphenate when used as an adjective, as in “a sunny-day dam failure.” Do not
hyphenate otherwise, as in “The dam failed on a sunny day.”
Version CapitalizeVersion Capitalize and do not abbreviate when referring to a specific version,
e.g. . Version 5.
Watershed UseWatershed Use this term when possible rather “basin,” “drainage basin,”
“catchment area,” and other terms. . Be cautious, however, because other terms may have an
established local usage, such as in the “Ossipotamie River Basin Conservancy Board.” In such
a case, “basin” may be preferred over “watershed” for consistency. Flooding from local intense
precipitation is often discussed in terms of subbasins, a more convenient term that
“subwatersheds”.
Web CapitalizeWeb Capitalized in reference when referring to the World Wide Web or its
components, for example “a Web page” or “this Web site.”
Windspeed AWindspeed A noun; not “wind speed.” “Wind-speed” is an adjective, as in “windspeed
measurements.”
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5.0 FORMATTING REPORTS
This Style Sheet was prepared using the format that it recommends for JLD flooding-related
documents, and so serves as an example of that format. . In particular, it incorporates the
styles for text and section headings described in Section 4.35.3. .
5.1 Templates
Templates2 are available for the principal kinds of flooding-related document. . Templates are
special Microsoft Word documents that provide structure and guidance for preparing floodingrelated
documents, but contain no site-specific information. .
Templates include section headings, text and heading styles, instructions to reviewerswriters,
boilerplate text, spaces for data to be filled in, and sample language. . Templates are formatted
as recommended in this Style Sheet, and serve as bases for developing properly formatted
reports.
5.2 Text Formatting
Word Processing Software GuidanceSoftware Guidance on report formatting is based on
Microsoft Word 2013. . Authors should usually track changes while preparing manuscripts;
however, turn off tracking of format changes, since this clutters the other comments. .
(On Word ribbon, Review tab/Track Changes/Change Tracking Options…/Uncheck Track
Formatting box.)
Font TheFont The text font in finished reports is Arial, 11 point. . More readable fonts may be
used for developing drafts.
Footnotes are in Arial, 10 pt. . The footnote number, both in text and in the footnote itself, is
Arial, 10 pt, superscripted.3
Styles TenStyles Ten custom Word styles have been defined to simplify applying the most
common text formats. . An entire paragraph may be formatted using a style by placing the
cursor anywhere within it (but not selecting any text), then clicking the style in the Styles section
of the Home tab on the ribbon. . The styles are:
 BodyText – Most ordinary text.
 Heading 1 through Heading 5 – Numbered section headings. . These are described in
detail in Section 4.35.3.
 Unnum. . 1 and Unnum. . 2 – Unnumbered section headings. . These are described in
detail in Section 4.35.3.
 List Paragraph – Bulleted lists, such as this one.
 References List – References, as described in Section 5.16.2..4
2 “Templates” is used here in the general sense of documents used as the basis for creating other
documents in the same general form. Such templates are ordinary Microsoft Word documents. They
should not be confused with the specialized usage of “template” in Microsoft Word, where templates are
an entirely different kind of document.
3 This is an example. See Section 7.5 for examples of spacing between footnotesNote the 3 pt spacing
between this footnote and the next….
4 Currently the References List style is essentially the same as BodyText. . It is provided so that the
references can be reformatted easily without affecting the text, for example if a hanging indent is wanted.
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Spacing Between Lines and Paragraphs UseParagraphs Use single spacing between lines, not
the line spacing of 1.15 that is a common default in Word.
The preferred method of spacing between paragraphs is for Word to automatically insert space
between paragraphs, rather than for the writer to insert blank lines manually. . This provides
finer control over paragraph spacing, and makes the spacing a property of the paragraph rather
than something that has to be managed separately. .
Paragraph spacings are preset in the Word styles included in this Style Sheet and in the
templates. . Spacing settings may also be changed in the paragraph settings box in Word. .
Preferred paragraph spacings for most text are:
 0 pt before a text paragraph
 6 pt after a text paragraph
 3 pt between footnotes.
Lists UseLists Use bullets for most lists in text. . The style List Paragraph is provided for this
format. . For example:
 Item 1
 Item 2
 Item 3
Use 3 pt paragraph spacing between items in a bulleted list, except 6 pt after the last item. . In
the paragraph settings box, uncheck “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style,”
otherwise the spacing will not be applied to the list. . These spacings are preset in the List
Paragraph Word style included in this Style Sheet and in the templates.
Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3) may be used if the list shows a sequence of steps to be taken, if items
need to be identified for discussion, or to indicate order of importance. . Avoid letters (A, b, c),
Roman numerals (i, ii, iii), and eccentric symbols (, , ) without good reason.
Spaces Between Sentences InsertSentences Insert two spacesone space after a period and
before the next sentence.5
Page Headers and Footers DoFooters Do not put anything in the header of the first page of the
report. .
In the header of the second and subsequent pages, put (1) a page number, centered and
flanked by hyphens, and (2) a short title, right-aligned and above the page number. . The short
title is only to help keep manuscripts straight while they are being prepared; deleted it from the
final report.6
In the footer, identify enclosures by adding “Enclosure”, “Enclosure 1” or the like, right-justified,
and only on the first page. . In drafts, it may be convenient for the footer to include tracking
information such as the date, revision number, total number of pages, or filename. . Delete
these from the final report.
5 This One space is a JLD practicepreference, and is consistent with the NRC Editorial Style Guide (NRC,
2009, Section 6, Punctuation, Item 16). Although the emerging standard appears to be one space
(University of Chicago Press, 2010, Section 2.9; Wikipedia, 2013), the use of two spaces remains
common.
6 Remember that we will prepare between 300 and 400 flooding reports. . Anything that helps keep them
straight is good.
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5.3 Section Headings
Five levels of numbered section headings are defined, and two levels of unnumbered headings.
. To simplify entering section headings, they are associated with seven Word styles.7 The Word
styles are included in the document templates. . Section heading styles are summarized Table
5.3-1:
Table 5.3-1. . Styles and Formats for Section Headings
To format a section heading, type the title for the section, place the cursor anywhere within it,
then click on the appropriate Word style as shown in the Styles section of the Home tab on the
ribbon.
Numbered section headings are used to organize the main topics of flooding reports. . Although
Word allows nine levels of section headings, the flooding reports should be limited to five
7 The section heading styles are organized as a multilevel list. This implements the automatic numbering
of sections headers and assignment of outline levels. These may be used to automatically generate a
table of contents.
Style Example Formatting
Heading 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION Arial 11 pt caps, underline, tab to 0.75 in.,
spacing 12 pt above, 6 pt below
Heading 2 1.1 Historical Background Arial 11 pt, underline, tab to 0.75 in.,
spacing 12 pt above, 6 pt below
Heading 3 1.1.1 Early Development Arial 11 pt, tab to 0.75 in., spacing 12 pt
above, 6 pt below
Heading 4 1.1.1.1 Possum Creek Dam Arial 11 pt italic, underline, tab to 0.75 in.,
spacing 12 pt above, 6 pt below
Heading 5 1.1.1.1.1 Dam Failure Arial 11 pt italic, tab to 0.75 in., spacing 12
pt above, 6 pt below
Unnum. . 1
(Heading 6)
Causes
Investigation showed that the dam had
defects of both design and
construction.
Arial 11 pt bold, underline, flush left,
spacing 6 pt above, 6 pt below, and placed
above the first line of text.
Unnum. . 2
(Heading 7)
Geological Conditions The most
serious condition was that the dam
was built on a poorly consolidated
siltstone.
or
Geological Conditions
The most serious condition was that
the dam was built on a poorly
consolidated siltstone.
Arial 11 pt italic, underline, flush left,
spacing 6 pt above, 6 pt below, and in line
with the first line of text. , or else above it.
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numbered levels in the interest of avoiding undue complexity. . Levels 6 and 7 are used for the
unnumbered styles. .
Unnumbered headings may be used below any level of numbered section heading (not just
below the Heading 5 level) when a less formal and intrusive heading style is wanted. . Either
the Unnum. . 1 or the Unnum. . 2 style may be used without the other. . For example, the
unnumbered sections under Section 3.04.0 of this Style Sheet are in the Unnum. 2 style.
Note that in the Unnum. 2 style, the style is usually applied only to the actual heading
(“Geological Conditions” in the example in the table above) rather than to the entire paragraph.
. The rest of the paragraph is formatted with the style BodyText. Style Unnum. 2 may also be
used for a heading above the first line of text (as with Unnum. 1) if a less obtrusive unnumbered
heading is wanted.
5.4 Tables and Figures
5.4.1 Tables
Format tables generally following the examples of Tables 54.3-1, 54.4-1, 54.4-2, 54.4-3, and
76.1-1, and 7.3-1. . Table formats are further described below. .
Because of the large variety of what goes into tables, authors should feel free to modify table
formats to meet specific situations. . However, be consistent within the document.
This table summarizes the usual format of tables:
Table 5.4-1. . Summary of Table Formatting (Arial 11 pt Bold)
Note: This table format may be adjusted as necessary.
1 Footnotes are Arial 9 pt, not bold, with 2 pt spacing between lines. Identify footnotes by superscript number, not by
letter or symbol (†,‡,*).
2 This footnote is added after the table; it applies to the sentence indicated by the superscript number.
This is an example of a typical table. . Note the different way in which notes following the table
are handled.
Table 5.4-2. . Resolution of Issues Identified During Review of Interim Actions1
Header Row Arial 10 pt Bold; No Space Above or Below Caption
Text in cells is Arial 10 pt.1 Cell borders are ½ pt black. . Cell margins: top and bottom, 0.02
in; sides, 0.08 in.2
If table extends onto more than
one page, repeat the header row.
Do not break a row across pages, if possible. .
Notes may be added below the
table.2 Do not enclose superscript
numbers in parentheses.
Notes applying to the entire table do not need superscript
numbers, but may be preceded by “Note:”, “Source:”, etc.
Description of Issue Issue Status and Resolution
Staff reviewers noted that the
licensee’s FHRR (Section 4.2.1.2)
describes barriers2 to direct flow
in the Turbine Building. .
The resident inspectors confirmed that the site’s severe weather
procedure has provisions to minimize water intrusion at the
elevation of 36 ft (11.0 m) NGVD29 on the Turbine Building deck. .
Specifically, the licensee procured inflatable barriers thatbarriers
that will be deployed to direct water away from susceptible areas.
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These are two examples of the same table presenting primarily numerical values, but with units
presented in two different ways. . Either form is acceptable, although the first form, with units
included in the table, is preferred:
Table 5.4-3. . Subbasin, Drainage Area, and Time of Concentration
Subbasin Description Drainage Area Time of
Concentration
1 West edge of site 0.0256 mi2 (0.0663 km2) 0.508 h
2 West of plant 0.0225 mi2 (0.0583 km2) 0.325 h
3 Southwest of plant 0.0068 mi2 (0.0176 km2) 0.187 h
4 West side of units 0.0087 mi2 (0.0225 km2) 0.223 h
5 Southeast of units 0.0202 mi2 (0.0523 km2) 0.349 h
6 Northwest of units 0.0219 mi2 (0.0567 km2) 0.235 h
Source: FHRR Tables 2.1-2 and 2.1-3 (CENG, 2013a)
or
Table 5.4-3. . Subbasin, Drainage Area, and Time of Concentration
Subbasin Description Drainage Area
mi2 (km2)
Time of
Concentration
(h)
1 West edge of site 0.0256 (0.0663) 0.508
2 West of plant 0.0225 (0.0583) 0.325
3 Southwest of plant 0.0068 (0.0176) 0.187
4 West side of units 0.0087 (0.0225) 0.223
5 Southeast of units 0.0202 (0.0523) 0.349
6 Northwest of units 0.0219 (0.0567) 0.235
However, the Supplemental Letter
does not mention these barriers.
Staff reviewers noted that the
licensee’s FHRR describes
procedure changes to ensure
access pathway doors2 are
closed for all doors susceptible to
the reevaluated local intense
precipitation level. . However, the
Supplemental Letter does not
mention this change. .
The resident inspectors confirmed that all of the affected doors are
security doors. . Security personnel will verify closure of the doors,
which, which are included in the severe weather preparation
checklist. .
Affected doors are:
 Turbine Building TK-5
 Creek Access3
 Main Right
1The footnotes to this table are inside the last row of the table. . In a finished table, the left, right, and bottom
borders, shown here as dotted, would be omitted.
2Barriers and doors are covered by the licensee’s Emergency Operations Plan.
3The Creek Access door requires sandbagging at flood levels above 355 ft NAVD88.
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Source: FHRR Tables 2.1-2 and 2.1-3 (CENG, 2013a)
5.4.1.1 Placement of Tables
 The preferred position for tables is after the text and before the figures. . Optionally, if
there are only a few small tables, they may be placed within the text (as shown in this
Style Sheet).
 If any tables are placed after the text, place them all there. . Do not place some tables
within the text but others at the end.
 During manuscript preparation, it is often convenient to place tables and figures in a
separate document from the text. . Tables and figures should be combined with the text
in a single document when the document is completed.
 If tables are small, more than one may be placed on a page.
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5.4.1.2 Table Numbering
 Number tables by report section, for example Table 3.2-1, 3.2-2, and so on for the first
and second tables in Section 3.2.
 Limit the report section in table numbers to two levels. . Thus if two tables were first
referenced in Section 6.5.2.1 and Section 6.5.4.3, number them Table 6.5-1 and Table
6.5-2. . Do not number them Table 6.5.2.1-1 and Table 6.5.4.3-1.
 Inserting table numbers into table captions is discussed in the following section.
 If you insert or delete sections, table numbers may need to be changed, both in table
captions and in text.
 Simple tables that are discussed only where they are located may not need table
numbers. An example is shown in Section 7.4.1.
5.4.1.3 If you insert or delete sections, table numbers may need to be changed, both in table
captions and in text.Table Captions
 Place captions above the table, centered. . Keep table captions brief. . Put explanations
or citations of sources in notes, usually below the table.
 Capitalize important words, as in “Summary of Flood-Causing Mechanisms.”
 To add a caption, selecting the entire table, right-clicking on it, and select “Insert
Caption” from the list. . Select options, such as position, if necessary. . A caption
inserted in this way is mostly ordinary text, and may be edited. . (The caption can also
be inserted as ordinary text, but the “Insert Caption” function is usually easier.)
 A caption inserted in this way contains a table-number code. . The code has a gray
background when selected with the cursor, but otherwise displays as a number; the
default format is 1, 2, 3… …. . The purpose of the code is to allow Word to generate a
list of tables.
 Replace the table-number code with a table number in the form described in the
previous section.
 Paragraph spacing before and after the caption is 6 pt, but this may be varied for
appearance.
 If you copy a table, the caption does not copy with it. . You must insert a new caption.
5.4.1.4 Formatting Tables
 The font is Arial. . Font sizes are: caption, 11 pt bold; column headings, 10 pt bold; table
text, 10 pt. . Sizes for column headings and table text may be varied if needed. .
 Cell borders are ½ pt black for simple tables. . If it is necessary to subdivide tables, use
heavier 1 ½ pt black borders, as in Table 7.1-1.
 Cell margins (space between text and border) are: top and bottom, 0.02 in.; left and
right, 0.08 in.
 Within cells, except for column headings, spacing between lines and paragraphs may be
the same as for other text. . Make adjustments as needed to fit text into table cells.
Column headings are centered horizontally and vertically within cells. . Set spacing
before and after paragraphs in the column headings to 0 pt so that this spacing will not
interfere with vertical centering. .
 Repeat column headings on new pages if the table extends beyond one page.
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 Do not allow rows to break across page breaks unless necessary for very high rows. .
High rows suggest that too much has been packed into the table. . Reconsider how the
information is presented; some of the table contents may belong elsewhere.
 Don’t use patterns or white text on black in column headings. . These copy and scan
poorly, and are sometimes handled poorly when files are converted to .pdf format.
5.4.1.5 Table Cell Values
 Numerical values in tables should be presented ,presented, if possible, using dual
customary and metric units. . (See Section 7.07.2.2 for discussion of dual units.)
 If space is very limited, it is acceptable to present values only in the primary units as
reported by the licensee.
 Units of measure can usually be identified within the table cells, just as in ordinary text. .
To save space, they may be identified in column headings, or in a note below the table,
as convenient.
 In Staff Assessments of the flooding hazard, table cells in Section 4.08 must contain only
one of the following: a numerical value, “Not Provided,” “Not Applicable,” or “Minimal.”
Appendix A, “Table Values for Staff Assessment Section 4.0,” provides further guidance.
5.4.1.6
5.4.1.75.4.1.6 Notes to Tables
 Notes are usually placed below tables. . Long introductory notes may better be entered
as text above the table, below the caption.
 Notes are Arial 9 pt, not bold, 2 pt spacing between paragraphs.
 Use superscript numbers (as with footnotes) for notes that refer to a specific part of the
table. . Do not enclose the superscripts numbers in parentheses, or use letters instead
of numbers. . Do not use Word’s footnote insertion feature, since such footnotes are
inserted at the bottom of the page rather than after the table.
 Notes that apply to the entire table may be introduced with “Note:”, “Source:”, or the like,
and do not need superscript numbers.
 Notes may be added below tables in three ways: as a separate text box, text outside the
table, or text inside the last row of the table., The third wayPlacing notes inside the last
row is usually most convenient.
 To add notes in the last row, insert a row at the bottom of the table, merge all columns in
the row, and remove the left, right, and bottom borders. . Notes added in this way
become parts of the table, and moveremain with the table if it is moved.
 If notes are added following the table, the distance from the table to the text below the
table may be set by: Select the entire table; right click and select Table Properties; Text
Wrapping = Around; Positioning; Distance from surrounding text, Bottom = 0.2” (or other
appropriate value).
8 Currently (October 2015) titled “Reevaluated Flood Height, Event Duration, and Associated Effects for
Hazards Not Bounded by the CDB.” This title, and the contents of this section, have changed in the past,
and may again. Therefore, caution is advised.
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5.4.2 Figures
The preferred location for figures is at the end of the report, after the text and tables. . A few
small figures may be inserted in the text. .
During manuscript preparation, it is often convenient to place tables and figures in a separate
document from the text. . Tables and figures should be combined with the text in a single
document when the document is completed.
5.4.2.1 Formatting and Placing Figures
Figures are captioned and numbered very much like tables. . To add a caption, selecting the
entire figure, right-clicking on it, and select “Insert Caption” from the list. . Unlike with tables,
Word inserts the caption as a text box rather than ordinary text. .
If a figure is inserted in the text, insert the caption above the figure. . If a figure occupies a
separate sheet, insert the caption below the figure. . Keep captions brief, Place explanations
and citations to references in notes that accompany the figure.
The caption contains a figure-number code. . Replace the code with a figure number as
ordinary text. . Number figures by report section, for example Figure 4.0-1, 4.0-2, and so on for
the first and second tables in Section 4.0. Limit the numbering of tables to two levels before the
hyphen.
If figures are derived from another source, identify the source in a note below the figure. . Use
“Source:” in the note to indicate that the figure was copied unchanged. . Use “After” or
“Modified from” to indicate that NRC staff modified the figure.
This is an example of a figure inserted in the text:
If a figure on a separate page is hard to read, consider rotating the page into landscape
orientation for additional clarity.
Figure 5.4-1. Backup Flood Notification
System
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The following page shows an example of a figure presented by itself on a separate page. .
Such figures are commoner than figures inserted in text.
If a figure on a separate page is hard to