2005-01-07 – DOE – NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY HAUL ROAD ANALYSIS AND JUSTIFICATION FOR ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION – EVALUATION OF INACCESSIBLE MATERIALS BENEATH PAVEMENTS

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REPLY TO
ATTENTION OF:
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
ST. LOUIS DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS
8945 LATTY AVENUE RECEIVED
BERKELY, MISSOURI 63134
January 20,2005 JAN 2 1 2005
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
SUPERFUND DIVISION
Subject: Final Version of North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for
Additional Investigation – Evaluation of Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements dated
January 7,2005
Mr. Dan Wall
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
Region VII, Superfund Branch
901 North Fifth Street
Kansas City, KS 66101-2907
Dear Mr. Wall:
Please find enclosed a copy ofthe North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and
Justification for Additional Investigation – Evaluation of Inaccessible Materials Beneath
Pavements Final, dated January 7,2005 for your records. The responses to comments on the
subject document were sent under separate cover on December 22,2004.
If you need any additional information or have any questions regarding this document, please
contact me at (314) 260-3915.
Sincerely,
Sharon R. Cotner
FUSRAP Program Manager
Enclosiu-es
CF: Mr. Robert Geller
40327800 lliil
Superfund
RECEIVED
JAN 2 1 2005
SUPERhUNU DIVISION
FINAL
NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY HAUL ROAD
ANALYSIS AND JUSTIFICATION FOR
ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION – EVALUATION
OF INACCESSIBLE MATERIALS BENEATH
PAVEMENTS
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
JANUARY 7,2005
Prepared by
U. S. Army Corp of Engineers, St. Louis District Office,
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
With assistance from
Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
Under Contract No. DACW43-00-D-051S
1/7/2005
North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION PAGE
1.0 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE 1
2.0 SITE BACKGROUND AND HISTORY 2
2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS 3
2.2 METHODS OF POSSIBLE IMPACT 7
2.2.1 How Impacts May Have Been Caused By Truck Transportation 8
2.2.2 Protection ofthe Materials Under Pavements From Direct Impacts 8
2.2.3 Low Probability of Occurrence Mechanisms that Could Result in Impacts
Under Road Pavements 8
2.3 CONSIDERATIONS AND PROCEDURES 9
2.4 HISTORICAL FIELD-TESTING 10
2.4.1 Results Ofhiitial Testing Under Roads 11
2.5 HAUL ROUTES BETWEEN THE SLAPS AND THE HISS/FUTURA SITE 16
2.5.1 Evaluation of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS. 23
2.5.2 Methods for Transporting Residues Between the SLAPS and the HISS 23
2.5.3 Conclusions 25
2.6 RESEARCH SUMMARY 26
3.0 SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY ROADS 33
3.1 SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF HISTORICAL TESTING 33
3.2 TYPICAL RIGHT-OF-WAY WIDTHS 40
3.3 AREAS OF FILL 41
3.4 BRIDGES 41
3.5 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 45
4.0 REFERENCES 46
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
LIST OF APPENDICES
A.l McDonnell Boulevard A-1
Figures Ml Through M8
A.2 1-270, Including Pershall & Dunn Roads… A-5
Figures PI Through P8
A.3 Eva Avenue A-8
Figures El Through E2
A.4 Frost Avenue I A-11
Figures Fl Through F2
A.5 Hazelwood Avenue A-16
Figures HI Through H4
A.6 Latty Avenue A-20
Figures Ll Through L3
A.7 1-170 A-25
Figures II Through 17
A.8 Lindbergh Boulevard A-28
Figures LBl Through LB3
A.9 North Hanley And Graham Road A-31
Figures HAI Through HA7
A.IO Airport Road A-35
Figures Al Through A3
A.ll Banshee Road…. A-37
Figures Bl Through B3
A.12 Poison Road A-40
Figures Al Through A3
A.13 Seeger Industrial Road A-42
Figures SI Through SI
A.14 Pavement Evaluation Of Nyflot Avenue A-44
Figures
A.15 Selected Historical Documents A-46
REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
RD 1 Copy Of “History Of Material Storage At The St. Louis Airport Storage Site” A-47
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
LIST OF EXHIBITS
EXHIBIT A – Investigation Under Road Pavement
EXHIBIT B – Key Map of Figures Included in Appendices
LIST OF TABLES
SECTION PAGE
Table 2-1 Comparison of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS 23
Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available 27
Table 3-1 Possible Impacts from Haulage SLAPS and the HISS 1966/67 …. 35
Table 3-2 Possible Impacts from Haulage HISS and West Lake Landfill 1973. 36
Table 3-3 Potential Wind, Stormwater or Floodwater Impacts 37
Table 3-4 Results of Testing 38
Table 3-5 Summary of Findings 39
Table 3-6 Cause of Impacts :.— 40
LIST OF FIGURES
SECTION PAGE
Figure 2-1 General Location of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, HISS,
and West Lake LandfiU Storage Sites in St. Louis, Missouri 12
Figure 2-2 Diagram of Route Scanned in the Vicinity of the Mallinckrodt Chemical
Plant Site, St. Louis, Missouri………………………………………………………………… 13
Figure 2-3 Diagram of Routes Scanned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Routes
Characterized by Bechtel National, Inc. in the Vicinity of the Lambert-St.
Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri 14
Figure 2-4 Locations of Impacts Found By Testing 15
Figure 2-5 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route A Most Direct Route 17
Figure 2-6 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route B 18
Figure 2-7 Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route C 19
Figure 2-8 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route D 20
Figure 2-9 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route E 21
Figure 2-10 Route Between the SLAPS and the HISS Route F 22
Figure 2-11 USGS Quad Map Locations 30
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Illustration 2.1 Typical 1960 20-Ton Over-the-Road Dump Truck 25
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
AC
AEC
aka
B&K
BNI
CADD
CDC
DOE
EPA
HISS
MoDOT
NRC
ORNL
OU
PCC
ROW
SAIC
SLAPS
SLDS
SOR
USGS
asphaltic concrete
Atomic Energy Commission
also known as
B&K Construction Inc.
Bechtel National, Inc.
computer-aided design and drafting
Commercial Discoimt of Chicago
United States Department of Energy
United States Envirormiental Protection Agency
Hazelwood Interim Storage Site
Missouri Department of Transportation
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Oak Ridge National Laboratories
Operable Units
Portland cement concrete
right-of-way
Science Applications Intemational Corporation
St. Louis Airport Site
St. Louis Downtown Site
sum of ratios
United States Geological Survey
DEFINITIONS:
Impact – Subject to the potential presence of residue.
Impervious – Will not allow the passage of fluid or dust.
Material – Any natural soil or manmade substance beneath a road pavement.
Obliterated – Completely demohshed and removed leaving no clear traces.
Residue – Waste byproducts fi-om processing activities carried out at Mallinckrodt Chemical
Works in downtown St. Louis.
Right-of-way – Land subject to an easement for the passage ofthe public and other public uses.
Road pavements – The hard, durable, impervious, manmade surface covering of a street
designed for the passage of vehicles.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
1.0 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE
This report determines the potential location of possibly impacted materials beneath road
pavements around the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) and the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site
(HISS). This report is limited to evaluating materials near or underlying the roadways located
within an area referred to as the SLAPS Road Study Area. The area to be studied is bounded by
the following roadways (See Exhibit A):
On the West by Lindbergh Boulevard,
On the North by Interstate 270,
On the East by Graham Road and North Hanley Road,
On the South by Airport Road to its intersection with McDonnell Boulevard and with
McDonnell Boiilevard to its intersection with Banshee Road and then with Banshee Road
This determination was accomplished by reviewing available records of pavement histories, road
construction dociunents, historical aerial photographs, available pavement borings, historical
maps and documents, site investigations, and other miscellaneous documents to determine when
and how these pavements were constructed and when and how the materials beneath these
pavements may have been potentially impacted by residue hauling or other possible means of
residue transportation.
Impervious pavements that existed during the period of possible impacts protected the
imderlying material fi-om direct exposure to residue; therefore, there is no need to subject those
materials to fiirther investigation. Conversely, fiirther investigation is needed in the areas where
pavements were constructed over materials possibly impacted by prior exposure to residues.
This report examines the history of road pavements relative to the effects fix)m residues in the
SLAPS Road Study Area.
This report
• Identifies the changes in road surface location, type of construction, right-of-way, and
pavement widths for the SLAPS Road Study Area roads from 1946 to the present (2004).
• Determines whether the road surfaces prevented residue from migrating from the surface to
directly affect the material beneath that pavement.
• Identifies where pavements have been constructed over areas possibly previously impacted
by residue. This residue originates from residue hauling activities or water and wind erosion
from the storage of wastes in the SLAPS Road Study Area.
• Evaluates the historical evidence, in conjunction with evidence from field-testing, to
determine where fiirther investigation is warranted.
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Those properties along each roadway which have been identified as vicinity properties are listed
in the following table.
Table 1-1 Vicinity Properties adjoining roadways
Road Segment
Eva Avenue
Hazelwood Avenue
Latty Avenue
Frost Avenue
1-170
1-270
Lindbergh Boulevard
North Hanley Road
Graham Road
Airport Road
Banshee Road
Pershall and Ehmn roads
Poison Road
Seeger Industrial Drive
Nyflot Road
McDonnell Boulevard
Vicinity Proprieties
16, 17,18,19
24, 31 A, 32, 33, 34, 35, 35A, 37, 38, 39, 39A, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44,
45,46,47,48,48A, 53
35, 37,38, 39, 39A
19, 20,20A, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31
31,31A,33,34,35,39,39A,50
48A, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 63A
3,63
52
15
15
14A
48,48A, 49, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62,
55,56
21,22,23,24, 32
39,41
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,14A, 15, 16
2.0 SITE BACKGROUND AND HISTORY
Starting in the early 1940s, uranium metal and other radioactive substances were produced at the
MaUinckrodt Chemical Works in St. Louis, Missouri. These facilities, as well as other properties
in their vicinity, are now collectively known as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS). Beginning
in 1946 the residue from this processing operation was transported to and stored on a 21.7-acre
property that is located north of St. Louis Mimicipal Airport (now Lambert-St. Louis
Intemational Airport). This parcel and surrounding areas are collectively now known as the
SLAPS. The site was used for the storage of residues from 1946 to 1967. The residues were
transported from the SLDS to the SLAPS by truck over public roadways. In 1966 the residues
were sold to a private company, the Continental Mining and Milling Company (Continental),
which transported the residues from the SLAPS over the public roadways to a second site for
eventual reprocessing and shipment by rail to Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City,
Colorado. This second site, 9200 Latty Avenue, is located south of Latty Avenue and east of
Coldwater Creek. This property and the surrounding properties are collectively known as the
Latty Avenue Site. The area was used to store residues from 1966 to 1973. The SLAPS and the
Latty Avenue Site are collectively known as the North St. Louis County Sites.
After the removal of the residues from the SLAPS by Continental, the SLAPS site was
transferred to the control of the St. Louis Airport Authority. The structures at the site were
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demolished and buried on-site. In 1970, approximately 1 to 3 feet of fill from airport
construction projects was brought to the SLAPS and spread over the site. This fill and the
retuming trucks traveled over public roadways.
After the removal of much ofthe residue from the HISS by rail transport to Colorado, a portion
ofthe remaining residues were removed and transported over the public roads to the West Lake
Landfill facility for disposal. This activity occurred in 1973.
During all of these activities, the residues were stored on the open ground with few engineering
controls to prevent erosion by water or wind action. The HISS and the SLAPS are also partially
within the floodplain of Coldwater Creek.
2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS
The residue from the Mallinckrodt refining operation is the potential source of impacts along the
roads. The events listed chronologically below are relevant to determining the possible inipacts
to roads.
• On April 24, 1941, Mallinckrodt began processing uranium ore in downtown St. Louis.
Mallinckrodt continued uranium refining in downtown St. Louis until 1959. These activities
were performed imder contracts with the Manhattan Engineer District and the United States
Atomic Energy Commission (AEC).
• In 1945 the Manhattan Engineering District began the process of looking for a 5-acre site to
store residues from the SLDS. The need for the land was urgent because there was no room
to store these residues at the downtown plant. The preferred land was to be:
– Fairly isolated or easily capable of isolation by the erection of fences
– Not subject to floods or excessive ground drainage
– Readily available, and preferably located to the north or northwest ofthe city.
• On March 2, 1946, permission was obtained to use the SLAPS for the storage of residues.
Actual title was not acquired until January 3, 1947. This land was acquired by
condemnation. Due to the “unfavorable publicity” generated by the condemnation
proceedings, a decision was made to erect a fence around the site. Most of the wastes and
residues were stored on open ground.
• From 1946 through 1958, residues were transported to the SLAPS for storage, mostly from
Mallinckrodt in downtown St. Louis. Private contractors using government-supplied
equipment transported the residues over the public roadways.
• In 1948 and 1949, highly radioactive radium-bearing residues were transferred from the
SLAPS to Femald, Ohio.
• In 1952, “several hundred tons of contaminated metal and debris” were buried at the SLAPS
under 6 to 8 feet of fill obtained from McDonnell Aircraft.
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• In 1954, sixty tons of captured Japanese uranium residues and approximately 500 tons of
other “low grade uranium bearing residues” were brought to the SLAPS from Middlesex,
New Jersey.
• In an inventory ofthe site dated April 11, 1959, it is stated that the following residues had
been deUvered to the SLAPS:
Pitchblende Raffmate, AM-7 74,000 tons
Raffinate, AM-10 32,500 tons
Slag, C-liner 7,800 tons
Interim Residue Plant Tailings, C-701 5,400 tons
Barium Cake, AJ-4 10,200 tons
Vitro residues 290 tons
Captured Japanese Uranium precipitates 60 tons
55,000 30^ and 50-gal drums as scrap 3.500 tons
Total tons hauled to the SLAPS prior to 1960 133,750 tons
These values were based on weight of residues delivered to the site with no adjustment for
moisture pickup.
Source: March 22,1960 drawing titled MCW DWG #6-1403-19-C.
See Reference Document No. 1 for a copy of a document titled History of Material
Storage at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, which contains a description of the
residue designations listed above and additional information conceming the origins
and disposition ofthe residues.
• In 1959, a raihoad siding and loading facilities were constructed at the SLAPS.
• In 1960, Federal Division of Raw Materials explored disposal ofthe residues. Per their June
1960 memo, the refined value ofthe cobalt, nickel, copper and selenium in the residues was
believed to be $15,000,000 to $20,000,000. In addition the residues contained 250,000
pounds of uranium, the value of which was not included in the $15,000,000 to $20,000,000.
• In 1962, bids were invited on the residues, and an award was made to Contemporary Metals
Corporation, Los Angeles (Contemporary); however. Contemporary failed to fiimish the
$50,000 performance bond and pay the $126,500 bid and defaulted on the contract.
Contemporary did no work on the site.
• Two additional invitations to bid were issued in 1964, neither of which produced a
responsive bid.
• In 1964, 4,000 tons of C-Oxide residues were shipped either to Femald, Ohio for processing
or to Weldon Spring for storage.
• A September 23,1965, Memo titled St. Louis Airport Resides listed the inventory for another
invitation to bid to be following five categories of residues. Separate bids were invited for
each category.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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Pitchblende Raffinate 74,000 tons
Colorado Raffinate 32,500 tons
Barium Cake, unbleached 1,500 tons
Barium Cake, leached 8,700 tons
Miscellaneous Material in Dmms 350 tons
The memo also discussed the proposed remediation ofthe site as follows:
“The major problem would appear to be in 5 acres in the west end of the area. This was
originally low swampy ground, drained by a couple of ditches. It was filled and graded and then
the Colorado Raffinate, some dmmmed material and contaminated waste of all kinds were buried
on this fill. However, there is buried somewhere in the fill about six carloads of metal scrap, an
unknoAvn quantity of drums, and a jeep.”
• In February 1966, Continental Mining and Milling (Continental) purchased the five residue
items listed above for $126,500. Continental then borrowed $2,500,000 from Commercial
Discount of Chicago (CDC) for the processing operation. The residues are believed to have
totaled 117,000 tons. Continental later purchased 7,800 tons of C-Liner Slag for an
additional $14,000.
• On December 21, 1965, the Village of Hazelwood approved the use of the 9200 Latty
Avenue property by Continental for refining operations.
• On February 14, 1966, AEC gave Continental a Source Material License for “Removal of
stockpile residues from 50 Brown Road, Robertson, Missouri, and storage only at the
licensee’s facilities located at 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri, in accordance with
the procedures described in the licensee’s application dated Febmary 4, 1966, and
supplements dated February 7 and Febmary 8,1966.”
• On February 28,1966, AEC gave Continental Notice to Proceed to remove the residues from
the SLAPS. Continental was given 400 days, until April 4,1967, to complete the task.
• In a five-month period, some time between March 1966 and April 1967, the residues were
moved from the SLAPS to the HISS by a hauling contractor hired by Contmental. This
move required ten dump tmcks for a period of five months and cost Continental $100,000.
• On Febraary 3, 1967, CDC foreclosed on Continental’s loan. CDC became the owner ofthe
residues and the HISS property at a public sale.
• February 14, 1967, the AEC provided a “punch list” of items in need of completion at the
SLAPS before April 4, 1967 in order for AEC to declare the work complete. One of the
punch list items was to remove an “apparently abandoned” haulage truck from the SLAPS.
• On April 14, 1967, the AEC wrote Hartford Accident & Indenmity Company stating that
Continental had not responded to earlier letters so “we (AEC) would assume from our
knowledge, that we can expect no fiirther action by them, so that we must, apparently, look to
you (Hartford) for finishing the work.” Hartford apparently paid to complete the clean-up
and AEC released their performance bond.
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• In 1967, CDC attempted to sell the residues; there were no bidders. The residues at the HISS
were estimated at 100,000 tons.
• From 1967 to 1968, CDC began drying the residues under an NRC license. The dried
residues were shipped to Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City, Colorado. By the end
of 1968,47,000 tons of residues had been shipped.
• In 1969, no activity took place at the HISS. The remaining residues were sold to Cotter
Corporation.
• In 1969, the SLAPS was transferred to the St. Louis Airport Authority. The St. Louis
Airport Authority demolished the existing buildings and buried the demolition debris on-site.
The SLAPS was then covered with approximately 3 feet of clean fill. In 1970, this fill was
tmcked in from the construction of Lambert-St. Louis Intemational Airport.
• In 1970, Cotter Corporation resumed drying operations and shipped all but 18,700 tons of
residues to Canon City, Colorado.
• In 1973, the Cotter Corporation hired B&K Constmction Inc. (B&K), a St. Ann, Missouri
road constmction company, to load the remaining residues onto rail cars for shipment to
Cotter Corporation facilities in Canon City, Colorado. Approximately 10,000 tons of
residues were shipped to Cotter Corporation in Canon City, Colorado without drying.
• In 1973, B&K disposed ofthe remaining residues (8,700 tons of leached barium sulfate cake)
at the West Lake Landfill. It is uncertain what occurred. B&K billed Cotter for shipment of
50,000 tons, but B&K and others state that only 9,000 tons were actually sent to the landfill.
The AEC was told that the remaining 8,700 tons of residue were mixed with 40,000 tons of
soil prior to being sent to the landfill, but it does not appear that this actually occurred.
• In 1976 and 1977, the HISS (it was then know as the Latty Avenue site) was evaluated by the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission for release for unrestricted use. Additional efforts were
found to be needed.
• In 1984, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report titled Post-Remedial Action
Report for the Hazelwood Site describing the testing performed to allow the cities of
Berkeley and Hazelwood to design a new Latty Avenue road pavement and storm sewer
system.
• In 1985, the DOE conducted mobile gamma scanning to detect any anomalies associated
with the transportation routes between the Latty Avenue Properties and the West Lake
Landfill. Impacts were found on McDonnell Boulevard, Pershall Road, and Hazelwood
Avenue.
• In 1986, DOE directed Bechtel National, Inc. to provide radiological support to the cities of
Berkeley and Hazelwood during the Latty Avenue road and storm sewer improvement
project. During this time concentrations of radium-226 and thorium-230 contamination in
excess of DOE remedial action guidelines were found along and under Latty Avenue. The
asphalt pavement itself was also found to be impacted. The existing asphaltic concrete (AC)
pavement was removed, as well as some of the material formerly under the pavement. A
6
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new Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavement was constmcted. The impacted material
was removed and stockpiled on the HISS.
• In 1986, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) issued a report entitled Results of the
Radiation Measurements Taken of Transportation Routes (LM004) in Hazelwood, Missouri.
This report indicated that anomahes were found along Pershall Road between Lindbergh
Boulevard and Poison Lane, along Hazelwood Avenue between Pershall Road and Latty
Avenue, and along McDonnell Boulevard between Byassee and Coldwater Creek. This
smdy was a follow-up to the 1985 DOE mobile gamma scanning listed previously.
• In 1990, in a report entitled Radiological Characterization Report for FUSRAP Properties in
the St. Louis, Missoxiri Area, Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) stated that, based on subsurface
drilling and testing, “In general, radioactive contamination is present in some areas
underneath Latty Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, and Pershall Road, and contamination
exists along both sides of Hazelwood Avenue and Pershall Road.”
• In 1991, the DOE conducted mobile ganuna scanning to detect anomahes. Anomalies were
detected on McDonnell Boulevard, Pershall Road, and Hazelwood Avenue.
2.2 METHODS OF POSSIBLE IMPACT
The possible sources of residues which may have impacted materials, which are now under
pavement, are hsted below.
• Residue from SLDS was placed at SLAPS from 1946 through 1959.
• Residue was hauled by tuck between the SLAPS and the HISS in 1966 and 1967.
• Fill material was brought by tmck from airport constmction projects to the SLAPS site and
the empty tmcks retumed to the airport m 1969 and 1970.
• Residue was hauled by tmck from the HISS to the West Lake Landfill in 1973.
• Storm water erosion from the SLAPS and the HISS site does not appear to have been
rigorously controlled. Aerial photographs from the early 1950s show tiie SLAPS drainage
ditches along interior roadways and around the stockpile areas, which discharge into
Coldwater Creek. Storm water would have carried residue into these ditches and then into
the Coldwater Creek floodplain.
• Wind erosion from the SLAPS and the HISS site does not appear to have been rigorously
controlled. The residues stored at the SLAPS were reported to be in piles 20 to 25 feet in
height, which would be higher than the surrounding terrain. The 20-foot height is given in a
June 13, 1991 document by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This document
states that “At the SLAPS site the uranium processing wastes were stored on open ground
and once covered two-thirds ofthe area to an estimated height of 20 feet.” A 25-foot height
is given in a 1959 memo as the height of a “Pitchblende Raffinate stockpile”.
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2.2.1 How Impacts May Have Been Caused By Truck Transportation
Some possible mechanisms for the loss of residue during transportation by tmck include, but are
not limited to, spillage from tmcks, dusting from driving at high speeds while hauling uncovered
residue, and falling of residue and residue contaminated earth from vehicle undercarriages, beds,
and wheels. Any areas adjoining traveled pavements not covered by other hard-surface
pavements might have been impacted.
A conceivable, but unlikely, mechanism for contamination, would involve mechanical
breakdowns or accidents involving the loaded tmcks. In the event of an accident or breakdown
of loaded vehicles, it is some times necessary for safety reasons that the load be dumped prior to
repairing or towing of the vehicle. Should one of these uncommon occurrences have occurred
involving a vehicle hauling residue if could have resulted in impact to areas on or near the
roadways used to transport residues.
2.2.2 Protection of the Materials Under Pavements From Direct Impacts
Hard-surface pavements should have shielded the materials directly beneath them from direct
impacts, while any areas adjoining hard-surface pavements (i.e., unpaved road shoulder and
nearby unpaved areas) could have been impacted. Hard-surface pavements are considered to be
Portland cement concrete (PCC) or batch-mixed and -placed asphaltic concrete (AC) pavement
of sufficient thickness to shield the material beneath. Oil-and-chip pavements, penetration AC
pavements, or seal-coat-over-aggregate pavements are not considered sufficiently durable or
nonporous to eliminate the potential for direct impacts to the material beneath them. Used in this
report , unless otherwise noted, AC refers to batch-mixed and -placed AC of sufficient thickness
and strength to prevent direct impacts to material beneath that pavement. Areas not covered with
hard surface pavements could have been impacted. Those areas could have subsequently been
paved as the result of new road constmction, rending the impacted material under the later
constmcted pavement inaccessible.
2.2.3 Low Probability of Occurrence Mechanisms that Could Result in Impacts Under
Road Pavements
There are several mechanisms that would result in impacts under otherwise impervious
pavements. Such mechanisms would include those described below.
Placement of new utilities. It is a common practice to place utility services within public rightof-
ways (ROWs) and sometimes under the road pavement. Such utility placement can resuh in
the removal of the existing pavement, trenching, backfilling, and replacement of the paved
surface. It is possible that the backfill material could be impacted material “borrowed” from
nearby road ROW or that the excavated material would be stored on impacted ground and
become impacted. Utilities could include, but would not be limited to, storm and sanitary
sewers, water, gas, electric, and communications lines. Boring, jacking, or other underground
tunneling methods could also be used to place such utilities. Therefore, any utility placement
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could have resulted in the movement of impacted material to locations that were previously
protected by pavement.
Repair of existing utilities. All utilities are subject to failure, and the repair and replacement of
failed utilities could have resulted in the placement of impacted materials to locations that were
previously protected by pavement. Water and sewer failures could also have resulted in the
movement of impacted material within the soil.
Structural failure of pavement, AC, or PCC. Such a failure could have allowed a route for
impacting agents to enter locations that are under the pavement. Also, the repair of stmctural
failures generally requires the removal and replacement of the existing surface and any failed
subgrade material. Pavement repairs could have resulted in the movement of possibly impacted
material to locations that were previously protected by pavement.
Pavement reconstruction. Impacts could have also resulted when an existing impervious
pavement was obliterated and a new pavement constmcted to replace it. The constmction
activities of demolishing and removing the old pavement, the regrading ofthe new subgrade, and
the constmction of the new pavement could have moved impacted material from Ihe former
shoulder area to beneath the new pavement.
While the mechanisms listed above could result in impacts to material located under otherwise
protective pavements, the conclusions of this report are based on the judgment that the chances
of such impacts are too low to justify additional testing of inaccessible material under substantial
pavemients. The material under such hard-surfaced and impermeable pavements is considered to
have been protected from direct impacts.
2.3 CONSIDERATIONS AND PROCEDURES
The purpose of this report is to identify those materials under currently existing pavements that
may have been impacted by residue lost during residue hauling activities, residues transported by
stormwater or wind erosion, and residues transported by stormwater flooding. This report
includes determmations for where the testing of materials under the pavement could find such
impacted material.
The conclusions ofthis report are based on the following considerations:
• Residues would not have directly impacted those areas protected by hard-surface pavements
prior to 1946.
• Pavements constmcted prior to 1966 would have protected the materials beneath them from
direct impacts from the 1966 and 1967 hauling activities between the SLAPS and the HISS.
• Pavements constincted after 1966, adjacent to tiie 1966 and 1967 tiie SLAPS-to-tiie-HISS
hauling routes could possibly have been placed over directly impacted materials.
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• Pavements constmcted after 1946 within the floodplain of Coldwater Creek downstream of
the SLAPS could possibly have been placed over materials impacted by residue transported
by water erosion and flooding.
Pavements constmcted after 1946 adjacent to the SLAPS could possibly have been placed
over materials impacted by residue transported by wind erosion.

2.4 HISTORICAL FIELD-TESTING
• In 1985, ORNL issued a report entitled Results of Mobile Gamma Scanning Activities in
Berkeley, Bridgeton, .andHazelwood, Missouri, which stated in part.”
“No anomalies were detected from the intersection of Pershall Road and Lindbergh
Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Natural Bridge Road (Highway 115), and Natural
Bridge Road to St. Charles Rock Road to the West Lake Landfill entrance. Also no
anomalies were detected on North Hanley from 1-270 to Airport Road, Airport Road,
Frost Avenue, and Eva Avenue. Anomalies were detected on McDonnell Boulevard,
south side, from Coldwater Creek to the intersection of Norfolk Southern Railroad
crossing and on the north side of McDonnell Boulevard from the Berkeley city limits to
Trumbell Asphalt sign near Byassee Road. Anomalies were detected along Pershall
Road, south side, from the Ford Motor Company, new car parking area, to just past
Poison Lane and on the north side of Pershall Road. Anomalies were also detected on
Hazelwood Avenue, mainly on the west side of the street, in front of Wetterau Perishable
Center approximately 115 feet south from the railroad crossing of Latty Avenue and one
spot on the west side of Hazelwood Avenue”.
• In 1986, ORNL issued another report, entitled Results ofthe Radiation Measurement Taken
of Transportation Routes (LM004) in Hazelwood, Missouri. This report identified
concentrations of higher-than-background radiation readmgs on McDonnell Boulevard
between Coldwater Creek and Byassee Road, on Hazelwood Avenue north of Latty Avenue,
and on Pershall Road between Poison Road and Lindbergh Boulevard. These were the only
routes surveyed for this report.
• In 1990, in a report entitled Radiological Characterization Report for FUSRAP Properties in
the St. Louis, Missouri Area, Bechtel National, Inc. stated that, based on subsurface drilling
and testing, “In general, radioactive contamination is present in some areas underneath Latty
Avenue, McDonnell Boulevard, and Pershall Road, and contamination exists along both
sides of Hazelwood Avenue and Pershall Road.”
• In 1991 DOE conducted mobile gamma scanning surveys to detect any anomalies associated
with the transportation routes around the SLAPS. The following roads near the SLAPS were
scanned:
St. Charles Rock Road from Fee Fee Road to Taussig Road
Fee Fee Road from St. Charles Rock Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Taussig Road from St. Charles Rock Road to Gist Road
Gist Road from Taussig Road to Garret Road
Garret Road from Gist Road to Missouri Bottom Road
Natural Bridge Road from St. Charles Rock Road to Lindbergh Boulevard
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Lindbergh Boulevard from Natural Bridge Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Banshee Road from Lindbergh Boulevard to McDonnell Boulevard
McDonnell Boulevard from Lindbergh Boulevard to Airport Road
McDonnell Boulevard from Fee Fee Road to Dunn Road
Dunn Road from McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard
Pershall Road from Lindbergh Boulevard to North Hanley Road
North Hanley Road from Dunn Road to Airport Road
Airport Road from North Hanley Road to McDonnell Boulevard
Eva Avenue from McDormell Boulevard to Frost Avenue
Hazelwood Avenue from Frost Avenue to Pershall Road
Frost Avenue from Eva Avenue to North Hanley Road
Latty Avenue from the HISS to North Hanley Road
The results were issued in a report titled Results of Mobile Gamma Scanning Activities in
St. Louis, Missouri. ORNL. This report also collected results from and discussed all of the prior
mobile gamma scanning testing activities. Figures illustrating the roads, which were scanned,
are reproduced as Figures 2-1, 2-2, and 2-3. Figure 2-1 shows the general location of the
Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, the HISS, and West Lake Landfill storage sites,
St. Louis, Missouri. Figure 2-2 is a diagram of routes scanned in the vicinity ofthe MalUnckrodt
Chemical Plant site, St. Louis, Missouri. Figure 2-3 is a diagram of routes scanned by ORNL and
routes characterized by BNI. in the vicinity of the Lambert-St. Louis Intemational Airport, St.
Louis, Missouri.
• This survey found no anomahes on the suspected haul routes in the vicinity of the
Mallinckrodt plant that could not be explained by factors other than haulage activities. The
survey found impacts along Latty Avenue from the HISS to Graham Road and confirmed the
impacts found along other haul routes in past surveys.
2.4.1 Results Of Initial Testing Under Roads
At least 1,632 samples have been collected in areas that are in or near existing road pavements.
Of these, 127 have individual test results exceeding remediation goals proposed in the Record of
Decision for umestricted release. These points are shown on the drawings contained in the
appendices. These data were obtained from the FUSRAP primary sample database and represent
the test results from many sources compiled into a common elecfronic format.
Figure 2-4 shows the roadways in or around which residue has been detected that may exceed
remediation goals in the proposed Record of Decision.
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Figure 2-1 General Location of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant and the SLAPS, HISS,
and West Lake Landfill Storage Sites in St. Louis, Missouri
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Figure 2-2 Diagram of Route Scanned in the Vicinity of the Mallinckrodt Chemical
Plant Site, St. Louis, Missouri
^
0»(LFOiW09Ml2S7
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Figure 2-3 Diagram of Routes Scanned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Routes
Characterized by Bechtel National, Inc. in the Vicinity of the Lambert-St.
Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri
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2.5 HAUL ROUTES BETWEEN THE SLAPS AND THE HISS/FUTURA SITE
In fransporting residue between the SLAPS and the HISS, the probable roads fraveled include
Eva Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue, Latty Avenue, Frost Avenue, 1-270, Lindbergh Boulevard
(also known as (aka) Highway 66/67), McDonnell Boulevard (aka Brown Road, State Route TT
or STT), Pershall Road (aka 1-270 Soutii Outer Road), Dunn Road (aka 1-270 Nortii Outer Road),
Graham Road (aka North Hanley Road), and Airport Road.
While there are many potential routes to get from one site to the other, the most direct route
involves a portion of McDonnell Boulevard from the SLAPS to Eva Avenue, Eva Avenue to
Frost Avenue, Frost Avenue to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue, and
Latty Avenue to the HISS (Route A). Route A is illustrated in Figure 2-5.
The photographic information examined shows evidence of wear consistent with heavy tmck
hauling on Eva, Frost and Latty avenues during the period consistent with the 1966 and 1967
haulmg activities between the SLAPS and the HISS. It seems likely that the greatest potential
for impacts would have occurred along the route described above. Reports from eyewitnesses to
the hauling activities indicate that the tmcks did use this route, except during periods of wet
weather.
When the hauling activities did not use Route A, because of weather-related effects on the
hauling roads, train traffic blocking the Frost Avenue crossing, or some other reason, other
possible routes might have included those listed below. Since Eva Avenue and part of Frost
Avenue were unimproved dirt roads at that time, they may not have been passable in times of
prolonged wet weatiier.
• Route B – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Pershall
Road, Pershall Road to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue. This route
is illustrated in Figure 2-6.
• Route C – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to Pershall
Road, Pershall Road to Graham Road, Graham Road to Latty Avenue. This route is
illusfrated in Figure 2-7.
• Route D – McDonnell Boulevard to Lindbergh Boulevard, Lindbergh Boulevard to 1-270,
1-270 to Graham Road, Graham Road to Latty Avenue. This route is illustrated in
Figure 2-8.
• Route E – McDonnell Boulevard to Airport Road, Airport Road to Graham Road, Graham
Road to Frost Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue. This route is illustrated in
Figure 2-9.
• Route F – McDonnell Boulevard to Airport Road, Airport Road to Graham Road, Graham
Road to Latty Avenue. This route is illusfrated in Figure 2-10.
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1-270 r
[
/ • ^ PERSHALL RDAD-
|ui
HAZEL VDDD
AVE.
LATTY AVE.
LATTY
AVE.
LINDBERGH BLVD.
MCDONNELL BLVD.

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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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2.5.1 Evaluation of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS
It is the conclusion of this report that Route A would have been the most heavily used route. If
Route A were not available, then Route B would be the next most reasonable route. Routes E
and F were also reasonable routes; however, there are constmction plans, completed in July
1966, for a major reconstmction of Airport Road. It is our judgment that this work would have
been placed out for bid in 1966 or 1967, making it likely that Airport Road was vmder
constmction when the SLAPS to the HISS haulage activities occurred. Residue hauling could
have used Airport Road before constmction started, during the Airport Road reconstmction, or
after constmction was finished. However, this use would be considered less likely than the use
of Route B. Routes C and D cannot be mled out but appear to offer no advantage over shorter
routes. Impacts have been found on Latty Avenue east of Hazelwood Avenue. For such impacts
to have occurred some haulage would have had to use Routes C or F. Table 2-1 compares routes
A through F.
Table 2-1 Comparison of Haul Routes Between the SLAPS and the HISS
ROUTE
Route A
Route B
Route C
Route D
Route E
Route F
LENGTH
2.15 miles
3.60 miles
4.33 miles
4.38 miles
3.28 miles
3.44 miles
COMMENTS
Most direct route
A reasonable route
No known advantage over shorter routes.
No known advantage over shorter routes.
A reasonable route. However, Airport Road believed to be under construction 1966 to
1967.
A reasonable route. However, Airport Road believed to be under construction 1966 to
1967
2.5.2 Methods for Transporting Residues Between the SLAPS and the HISS
According to an August 15, 1967 memo titied Historical Review ofthe Mallinckrodt Airport
Cake, beUeved to be from the Congress of the United States, House of Representatives,
Committee for Public Works and Transportation, Science and Technology, the residues were
moved from the SLAPS to the HISS by Continental Mining and Milling of Chicago, Illinois.
This move required ten dump tmcks for five months and cost Continental $100,000.
In a bid dated December 27, 1965, from Braun Excavating Company (Braun) to Contemporary
and Continental, Braun made the following statement:
The unit price quoted includes loading of material into tmcks at the existing stockpile
area, transporting same to the new stockpile area, unloading and stockpiling. We
anticipate washing down the tmck wheels before entering the pubhc road, utilizing the
existing wash facilities at the BroAvn Road location. We fiirther anticipate the necessity
of keeping a bulldozer and operator at the General Electric plant site to stockpile the
material as it is dumped, and the second washing down of the tmck wheels before again
entering the road.
Items which we have not included in our Per Ton price quotation, and which are to be
bome by other, are as follows:
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a. Tmck washing facilities at both present and future stockpile areas.
b. Water used for washing tmcks.
c. Additional hazard insurance coverage over and above our present
standard workman’s compensation, and comprehensive liabihty
coverage.
d. Required periodic medical examinations, special wearing apparel, etc.,
for employees.
e. Weighting facilities for tmcks at either location, and wages for scale
man.
f. Any special material, such as wax paper, oil, sand, etc., required to
facilitate dumping of material from tmcks.
g. Facilities to be used by employees for washing, showering, and changing
of apparel.
It is likely that the acmal haulmg activities in 1966 and 1967 were conducted using methods
similar to the above. The residue would have been carried in over-the-road dump tracks.
Loading of the tracks would have been by portable conveyor system or front-end loader. Either
method would have produced dust.
Braun’s bid price for this work was $1.25 per ton. The confractor who actually performed this
work m 1967 for Continental was paid $100,000, which would be approximately $0.85 per ton.
It is believed that the tracks used would have been 20-ton dump tracks, similar to the one shown
in Illusfration 2.1; however, no documented evidence conceming the acmal type of equipment
used, other than that the equipment used for transport was “dump tracks”, has been located to
date.
An indication ofthe level of dust control expected in this work in the mid-1960s comes from a
United States Memorandum dated July 25, 1967, entitled Requirements for Surface Cleanup of
the Airport Site, which states
…the following should be considered the general plan for decontamination, which the
Airport Commission will be required to follow. It is noted that none of the clean-up
operations are of such nature to require film badging or protective precautions other than
ordinary personal hygiene practices. All tmcking operations shall be conducted in a
manner to assure minimum dusting. This can be easily accomphshed by wetting down
tmckloads prior to departure.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
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Illustration 2.1
^ ^ 1 Si
* ” .:
am*
m
: • • • ‘ ^ ^ ^ v r #]
p – ^ . . :•%, –
•”**~~’»s««^’gg;’-_-.~-yt^’
JlfiilraiTi^rieweg Photo >-
&.1
. . . . . . . -‘t
-‘i:-‘*., .-A. Y*
.„!» a., t – ‘ -^ ri
…… viTJ- ^’H
l\?s l ^ ‘ * M * i p J i i ^ ~
“¥’ ;-•: •
J
1 , i
” J ‘
^ V ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H
. . ‘ . . • • ‘
– – * – ‘ . – * • » • ‘ , ‘ . ^.
Typical 1960 20-Ton Over-the-Road Dump Truck
The information available indicates that the hauling of materials from the SLAPS to the HISS
required 10 dump trucks for a period of five months. A typical 1960 era 20-ton dump tmck is
shown in Illustration 2.1 above. This type of truck has a bed capacity of 12 cubic yards. Dry
loose earth has a typical weight of 2,000 pounds per cubic yard. Heavy wet mud has a typical
weight of 3,000 pounds per cubic yard. Assuming a weight for the residue of 2,500 pounds and
that each truck was loaded with 12 yards of material would mean that each tmck load would
carry about 15 tons of material. The trucks would need to be heaped to carry the 20 tons
capacity. It is common practice for each truck to carry the maximum possible load. If the
material were heaped it would increase the chance of dusting and spillage from the truck bed. To
move the 120,000 tons of residue would have required between 6,000 and 8,000 trips.
2.5.3 Conclusions
The primary means of transport of residue between the SLAPS and the HISS was by means of
dump trucks. The most probable route for transport of residues between the SLAPS and the
HISS was Route A, from the SLAPs to McDonnell Boulevard to Eva Avenue, Eva Avenue to
Frost Avenue to Hazelwood Avenue, Hazelwood Avenue to Latty Avenue as shown in Figure 2-
5. However, Routes B, E, and F, as shown in Figures 2-6, 2-9 and 2-10, were also used. These
routes appear to have offered the quickest and most economical routes between the SLAPS and
the HISS in 1966 and 1967.
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McDonnell Boulevard must have been used as a haul route. McDonnell Boulevard is the only
road access to the SLAPS.
Lindbergh Boulevard must have been used as a haul route, since impacts have been fotmd on
McDonnell Boulevard west of Coldwater Creek. The impacted areas on McDonnell Boulevard
cannot be explained by wind or stormwater action. The impacts must be the result of haulage
activities. Lindbergh Boulevard has tmdergone extensive widening and reconstmctions since
that time and any impacts to the shoulders in 1967 or earlier would now be under pavement.
Graham Road must also have been used as a haul road, since impacts have been fotmd along
portions of Latty Avenue east of Hazelwood Avenue. The impacted areas on Latty Avenue east
of Hazelwood Avenue cannot be explained by wind or stormwater action and must be the result
of haulage activities. This haulage activity must have occmred as part ofthe 1966 and 1967
haulage of residues from the SLAPS to the HISS. There are two possible routes from the SLAPS
to the HISS involving Graham Road. One route would have entered Graham Road from 1-270 or
Pershall Road and proceeded south on Graham Road. This portion on Graham Road has been
obliterated and been totally reconstmcted as the much wider North Hanley Road. Any impacts
to the shoulders of Graham Road in 1967, where it has been replaced with North Hanley Road,
would now be imder the North Hanley Road pavement.
The second route would use Graham Road by way of Airport Road and proceed north on
Graham Road. Airport Road was tmdergoing reconstmction in 1966 and 1967 and would have
likely been an tmdesirable haul route because of the constmction-related delays likely to be
encoimtered in the use ofthis route. A portion ofthe pre-North Hanley/Graham Road pavement
is still m existence. The portion in existence also contains the location of a former raihoad
crossmg ofthe Norfolk Southem mainline.
2.6 RESEARCH SUMMARY
Documents were obtained and reviewed from a number of sources. Among the records reviewed
were aerial photographs, constmction plans, road maintenance records, county tax records,
highway maps. United States Geological Survey (USGS) quad maps, and historical documents.
One key document was a 1992 United States Envirormiental Protection Agency (EPA)
Region VII smdy entitled Aerial Photographic Analysis of the St. Louis Airport Study Area,
Hazelwood, Missouri. This document contains a collection of aerial photographs from the years
1941, 1953, 1965, 1971, 1974, 1980, 1984, 1985, and 1990 showing tiie HISS and tiie SLAPS
and some ofthe surrounding roads. Each photograph is accompanied by an analysis ofthe work
being done on or around the sites at each particular time. These photographs of the sites were
indispensable in determining what had occurred on the roads over time. While these
photographs provide excellent coverage ofthe roads immediately adjacent to the SLAPS and the
HISS, they do not always extend far enough to cover Route 67 (aka Lindbergh Boulevard),
Airport Road, North Hanley Road, or 1-270. In addition, the scale of the photographs is very
large, with 1 inch equal to 1,000 feet and 1 inch equal to 2,000 feet being the most common.
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This large scale made it difficuh to determine with certainty the condition and type of the road
surface.
Additional aerial photographs were obtained from St. Louis County. These aerial photographs
were 1 inch equal to 200 feet or 1 mch equal to 400 feet in scale. St. Louis Coimty has aerial
photographs available from 1966, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1993, 1995, and 1997. The 1966 (1 inch
equal to 200 feet) and 1997 (1 inch equal to 400 feet) photographs were copied and reviewed for
the purposes of this report. The other photographs were from periods in which other coverage
was available or covered times of lesser interest and, therefore, were not purchased for review.
Aerial photographs were also obtained in electronic form from Surdex Corporation, a St. Louisbased
aerial photogrammetry firm. These photographs were from 1965, 1971, 1973, 1975, and
1997. The figures included in the appendices use the 1997 aerial photographs as background and
also show the outiine ofthe pavement from the 1965 photographs.
All of these aerial photographs were used to determine what generally occurred on the roadways
over time. The interpretation of this type of information is, by necessity, subjective. The
photographic data available for review is hsted m Table 2-2.
Constmction plans and maintenance records provide more objective and detailed information to
supplement the interpretation of the aerial photographs. The dates available are from the fiscal
year m which the projects were fimded for constmction, and those are the dates used in this
report. The actual date of constmction might be as many as several years later. The infomiation
from the constmction and maintenance records was used in preference to the aerial photographs
wherever possible; however, for some ofthe roads, the aerial photographs were the only records
available. Those aerial photographs available are listed in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available
YEAR
1941
1953
1958
1965
1965
1966
1971
1971
1973
1974
1975
1980
SCALE
1:11000
1:20,350
1:10,895
CADD
1:11,110
1:2400
1:10,825
CADD
CADD
1:12,115
CADD
1:7,777
USED
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
SOURCE
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Coiporation
1992 EPA Study
St. Louis County
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Corporation
Surdex Corporation
1992 EPA Study
Surdex Corporation
1992 EPA Study
COMMENTS
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Table 2-2 Aerial Photographs Available (Cont’d)
YEAR
1981
1984
1985
1985
1990
1993
1995
1997
1997
SCALE
1:4800
1:6,060
1:8,290
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
1:4800
CADD
USED
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
SOURCE
St. Louis County
1992 EPA Study
1992 EPA Study
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
St. Louis County
Surdex Corporation
COMMENTS
Color Photograph
Believed same as Surdex CADD below
For those roadways that are part ofthe state of Missouri highway system (e.g., 1-170, 1-270,
(1-270 includes Dimn Road as the north outer road and Pershall Road as the south outer road),
Lindbergh Boulevard (State Route 67), and McDonnell Boulevard (State Route TT), a key
resource was the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) pavement history drawings.
These drawings show the project year and type of road surface constmcted. Equally important,
they provide the constmction project number, which is the key to MoDOT’s microfilm system of
the old constmction plans for those highways. Only selected constmction plans were obtained
for this report, but should a greater level of detail be desired in the fiiture, additional plans are
available.
The pavement history drawings obtained from MoDOT were as follows:
096 St. Louis Sheet 8 of 31 covermg 1-170
096 St. Louis Sheet 11 of 31 covering Lindbergh Boulevard (State Route 67)
096 St. Louis Sheet 20 of 31 covermg 1-270
096 St. Louis Sheet 25 of 31 covering McDonnell Boulevard (State Route TT)
Selected highway constmction plans were obtained for portions of 1-170, Lindbergh Boulevard,
1-270, Pershall Road, and McDonnell Boulevard. Additional details of the plans reviewed are
provided in the appendices with the associated roads. These plans were also used to help
determine the ROW widths and whether fill was placed on impacted material.
Selected St. Louis County Land Information Services maps were also obtained. These
computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) drawings are at a 1-inch equal to 400 feet scale and
show street and road ROWs and property boundaries of all parcels. They also list the St. Louis
County Locator Number for each parcel. With the locator number, the owner of record, last
recorded deed, zoning, and other information can be obtained from the St. Louis County Web
site. The reliability ofthe information from the county tax assessor’s office, however, must be
considered low. The assessor’s office makes no warranty as to its accuracy, and the quality
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assurance of the input of this mformation is poor. For certainty in property boundary-line
location, a registered land surveyor, using the latest property boundary description of record,
surveyed property monument locations, and the historical chain of title for that parcel, should
locate boundary and ROW lines in the field. The maps obtained were Map Panels 9-K, 9-L,
10-K, 10-L,11-K, and 11-L.
In addition, selected tax assessor’s maps were obtained. These hand-drawn and hand-updated
drawings are at various scales, with 1 mch equal to 150 feet being the most common. These
drawings have the dimensions ofthe property boundary lines, acreages, coimty location number,
record owner, existmg buildings and pavements, and recording information of deeds or plats.
The quality assurance of these records is also poor, but they do provide some additional
information. These linens are quite old, and some times provide a historical record of what
might have occurred on a parcel over time. These drawings certainly predate any work at the
SLAPS or the HISS. The panels obtained were Map Numbers Ferguson-Florissant R-2 6, 7 and
Hazelwood 237,238, 245,247b, 249,250.
Historical highway maps were obtained from the COE. The maps obtained were dated 1952,
1965, and 1976.
Historical mapping from the USGS reviewed included the maps hsted below. Figure 2-11 shows
the six USGS quadrants of primary interest.
29
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
Clayton Quad Map
1941 (photographed 1933)
1941
1954
1954 (photograph revised 1968)
1954 (photograph revised 1968 and 1974)
Columbia Bottoms Quad Map
1935 (photographed 1924)
1941 (pubhshed 1952) ‘
1941 (pubhshed 1959)
Granite City Quad Map
1940 (photographed 1933)
1950 (photographed 1949)
1956
1954 (photographed 1952; published 1958)
1954 (photographed 1952; pubhshed 1966)
St. Charles Quad Map
1933 (photographed 1927)
1947 (photographed 1927; revised 1946)
1955 (revised 1946).
1960 (photographed 1952)
1969 (photographed 1952; revised 1968)
1975 (photographed 1968)
1986 (photographed 1974)
roll 079, frame 321
roll 079, frame 322
roll 229, frame 075
roll 079, frame 319
roll 079, frame 318
roll 079, fi^me 364
roll 079, frame 363
roll 079, frame 361
roll 059, fi-ame 216
roll 059, frame 214
roll 059, fiame 213
roll 059, frame 212
roll 059, frame 211
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 082,
roll 229,
roll 229,
frame 178
firame 177
frame 176
fiame 175
frame 169
frame 378
fiame 377
Creve Coeur Quad Map
1940 (photographed 1933)
1956 (photographed 1933; revised 1954)
1959 (photographed 1952)
1966 (photographed 1952; revised 1965)
1969 (photographed 1968)
1976 (photographed 1974)
roll 079, frame 385
roll 079, frame 386
roll 079, frame 383
roll 082, frame 175
roll082, fi:amel69
roll 229, frame 378
31
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
Florissant Quad Map
1954 (photographed 1952) roll 080, frame 053
1966 ^photographed 1952; revised 1954) roll 080, frame 052
1968 (photographed 1968) roll 080, frame 051
1975 (photographed 1974) roll 229, fiame 134
1982 (photographed 1979) roll 385, frame 041
Many documents were reviewed during the preparation ofthis report. Those documents found to
be most pertinent are hsted in Appendix A.15.
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North St. Louis County Haul Road Analysis and Justification for Additional Investigation-Evaluation of
Inaccessible Materials Beneath Pavements
3.0 SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY ROADS
3.1 SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF HISTORICAL TESTING
Testing has identified impacted material adjoining several suspected haul roads. This testing has
also found evidence of impacts believed to be associated with erosion of the SLAPS and
flooding of Coldwater Creek and also with wind and storm water erosion. Based on the results
of all scanning information report