1977-07 – DOE – Preliminary Report on the Results of a Radiological Survey Conducted at the Former Cotter Property

1977-preliminary-report-on-the-results-of-a-radiological-survey-conducted-at-the-former-cotter-property

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Keyword(s): ——-
0
D
D
~
D
D
D
HistoricaJ Ia formation
En.vironmental Data
Radiologieallncidents/Accidents
Workplace Monitoring Data (i.e.; contamination
s~s, general area/breathing zone air sampling,
radonlthoron monitoring, area radiation surveys,
fix.ed location dosimeters, missed dose information,
Radiologi~ Ccntrollimits, Radiation Work Pennits)
Process Descriptions (i.e.; general description,
source tenns, encapsulation/containment practices)
Site Dosimetry:
D
D
D
0
Medi~aVX-ray & External Dosimetry
(i.e.; TLD Film Badges, Pocket Ion Chambers)
Internal Dosimetry {i.e.; urinalysis, feca~
In-Vivo, breath sampling, radon/thoron, nasal
sm~:ars)
Monitoring PrograiU Data (i.e.; analytical
methods for bioassay, dosimeter performance
characteristic~. detection limits, exchange
.frequencie!i, record keeping practices,
meastnment units)
Internal Information (i.e.; radionuclides
and associated chemical forms, particle size
distributions, respiratory protection practices,
solubility class).
CJaimaut Specific Document
Re<:ords Staff- flU o~~-tb¢ f~U.o~~g.prior to sc:arf~ing ·or wpyi&g () /000 ls-!l. . . . . Project Box Number: :·· Pr~j~~Dol:ument ~umber: ·: . ~ Folder Title:_·_.·_·.....__ ___. ....;-.,._. ......._ _._..,..:~-~.. ....,_--;--...:..;.;._...,...... ___- -.:.·-:·:. ._,·, .,..:.;...•. .....;-.·- '-:'-........... ;...._7------'-_...;_--...o........: . . . . : ,.;. ~· : .. ~ · .... -..... :-, .: ·. ·.· .. .. ·.· ~: • • -:4 '.:· : ~.:·:~~:· · . ...·.· .. . . . . -: ··. ·· . . _, .... :·· . :'. ·;·. · .... " . . ',1: . ',• ... : . OCT 21 1983 ~tr. John E. Baublitz. D1 rector';:.:_ D1v1s;on of Remedial Action Programs Office of Terminal waste Dhp!osal and Remed1 a 1 Act 1 on · ....... Office of Nuclear Energy Oepartment of Energy wasn1ngton, o.c. lOS4S Dear Mr. Baublitz: .. - This is fn response to your letter of October s. 1983 regarding the Department of Energy•s (DOE) research and development project at the fonmer Cotter Corporation site on Latty Avenue 1n Hazelwood. Missouri. ~Regarding the preliminary survey conducted in late September 1983, by your contracto·r. ·Oak .Ri.~s.e tlational Laboratory. we are aware that not all of the contamination is c~1ned to the p11e of contaminated soil. As indicated in the letter frQn w~ T. Crow to E. Dean Jarboe dated August 22, 1979 (enclosed) only the area identified as Parcel I has been released for unrestricted use. The decontam1nat1on of Parcel 11 was never completed because all decontamination efforts were stopped in January 1979 wnen Colonel Griggs. A1rport Director. requested that we delay transfer of the contaminated soil to the airport until quest1ons raised by Congressman Robert A. Young were resolved. After Congressman Young's concerns were addressed and he agreed that the contaminated soil should be moved to the airport site, the St. Louis Airport Authority decided not only d1d they not want the wastes from Latty Avenue but they wanted DOE to reassume title to the atrport site. We were pleased to note that Congress gave DOE authority and funds to take act1on at the Latty Avenue site. because our planned remedial actions have been ~ont1nually oe·t~ Missouri 63130
Norfolk and Western R.R.
ATTN: Mr. R.S. Michels
Regional Manager
Industria1 Rea1 Estate
.Railway Exchange Building
St. Louis~ Missourj 63101
Commonwealth Edison company
ATTN: Mr . J.J. O’Connor
Executive Vice President
P.O. Box 767
Ch icago , Il linoi s 60690
Missouri Di vision of Heal t h
-2-
AITN: Mr . Ken Mj11er, Acting Director
Bu~eau of Radiological Health
1407 Southwest Boulevard
P.O. Bux 570
Jefferson City, Missouri 65101
Missouri Department of Natural Resources
ATTN: M~. Car~1yn Ashfuro. Director
1014 Madison Street
J efferso!! City, ~·1issouri 65101
Mr. Ed McGrath
28 Fr€de rick Avenue
Gaithe rsburg, Mary1and
: ..• ~ … -~ .-= ··: ··.·
,.-……
‘• !
PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE RESULTS OF A RADIOLOGICAl. SURVEY
CONDUCTED AT THE FORMER COTTER PROPERlY
Introduction
A radiofogica( survey was conducted during the periods June 27 throush
July 1 and July 11 through July 14, 1977, at the former Cotter property,
located at 9200 Latty Avenue in Hazelwood, Missouri. A summary of the
results is presented here. AH information presented in this report is of a
preliminary nature and wiU be updated when further analysis has heen completed.
There a~e four buildings, covering a total of approximately 18,000 ft
2
,
on this ll-aere site. The· buildings are presently being prepared for use in a
chemicoJ coating operation. At the time of the survey, there .were four construcfion
workers on the site. Scaled drawings of the property are shown m
Figs. l and 2.
Summary of Survey Ke.sults
Building 1: This structure measures 120 ft x 100 ft, has a 30-ft ceiling, a
dirt floor, and open areas along the wells (including spoces for
~; 33 windows) totaling approximately 2500 ft2.
Beta-gamma close rates were measun:cl at 1 em above the surface with
G-M wrvey meters on the floor, walls, ceiling, and ~supports. Measurements
on the floor and lower walls were mode at points determined by a 20 ft x 20 ft
grid (see Fig. 3), and additional measurements were made at potnts showing
hiehest external gamma radiation levels. . .. O~erheod measurements were mci§TI
. ‘AUG 8 ·· ~ . . . • –· .dJi;::..- • …..tj;.
. : ·;·i·- -~. .. •. – • . ; :.; : .
. . …..~. -·~: ,~y~~
·— ·-……—– “: ~-~~~’ -~’ — _,_ …. —- —

.,. .. f
.—…
-2- .·,
at uniformly and closely spaced points. Results ore given in Table:. J and 3
and Fig. 3. Beta-gamma dose rates in the building exceeded 0.20 mrod/hr
at most poinfl and were as high os 2.4 mrod;hr of 1 em above the dirt floor.
External gamma radration levels at l m above the surface were measured
with Nal scintillation meters and with closed-window G-M meters. Readings
were taken at the points of the grid mentioned before (see Table 1}, and
maximum external gamma radiation levels were determined within alternate
squares formed by the same grid (see Fig. 4). Readings were generally in
·the range of J00-500 JJR/hr.
Direct alpha readings wer~ taken on the walls, ceiling, and supports
with alpha scinti11otion. survey meters. Results ‘ore reported in Fig. 3 and
Table 3. Maximum readings within the grid blocks on the lower walls (that
is, Jess than 6 ft above the floor) exceeded 600 dpm/100 cm2 throughout.
The highest reading ·~as JS,OOO dpm/100 em2• Maximum readings generally
were observed on a steel ledge. Direct alpha readin9s WerP. tt.:~ken at
approximately 5 em above thP. dirt flo~r at a few points; these readi;,g:»
exceeded 5,000 dpm/100 cm2 at some points and probably resulted from
radon emanating from the soi I.
·Transferable alpha and beta contamination lttvels were measured on the
ceiling, wa11s, and supports. Results are reported in TabJe 4. Transferable
alpha contamination levels were s~nerally higher than transferable beta levels;
transferable alpha levels averaged JJS dpm/100 cm2 on the lower walls and
55 dpm/100. crn2 on overhead .surl’aces.
,. · . . ::·· .
. . __ ….. ……,…..:—-·-··-··-·–.. —– ~·-·—–· .. – . .. .
:.
‘ I ‘
·:.::· ..
.-:-•
Roden concentrations in air were measured continuously over 24-hr
periods with Wrenn chambers. Results are reported in Tobie 5. Although
the building was open at all times and underwent several air exchanges per
hour, radon concentrations were as high as 57 pCi/Jiter.
Building 2: This structure measures 60 ft x 50 ft and hos a dirt and
gravel floor. At the time of the survey, the building had
uncovered door, wall, and window operungs totaling approximately
500 ft2•
A survey plan identical to that for Buildjng 1 was employed except
that fewer grid blocks were used; each grid block measured approximately
20 ft X 17 ft (see fig. 5). Results for beta~amma cose rates ore presented
in Tables 2 and 3 and Fig: 5. Beta-gamma dose rates were gencrofly lower
than in Building 1 but exceeded 0.20 mrad/hr in some places. It appeared
that high gamma rodl~tion levels outside the building were in pc~t re~po11S•Lie
for the elevated beto-gam’!’O dose ro~e~ and P.xternol ;om:.:~ :-odi.:;io;·, it:vt:i:i
(see Table 2 •”Jnd F:g. 6) inside the structur~. Maxi.rr.um direct aipha readings
within srid block~ on the lower walls (fjg. 5} were generally in the range
1,300-2,600 dpm/100 cm2. Again, highest readings were on a steel ledge.
Traruferabfe alpha and beta contamination levels we~re slightly lower than
those in Building l (see Table 4). Radon concentrations in air in this open
building were as high as 7 pCi/liter.

·-·-··– —··—-·–······ .. ·.
.:
t
‘ \ ! l i
, –.
“– :’
– 4-
Building 3: This structure measures 42 ft x 28 ft and has a 1.5-20 ft ceiling
and a concrete floor.
The floor and lower walls were divided into 7 ft x 7 ft blocks, and
maximum direct alpha readings and beta-gamma dose rates were detemined
for each .block (see Fig. 7). Direct alpha readings and beta-gamma dose
rates on overhead surfaces are given in Table 3. Transferable alpha and beta
contamination levels ore given in Table 4. E~ternaf gamma radiation levels
at J m above the surface at randomly selected points are given in Fig. 8.
Radiation levels were generally lower than in Buildings J and 2, except for
alpha contamination levels. Radon concentrations in air did not exceed
1 pCi/liter.
Building 4: This small structure (56 ft x 20 ft) was partially destroyed
in a fire and is undergoing extensive construction modifications,
particularly on thg v·,alls and ceiling. The buildhig has a
concrete floor.
Radiation levels were generC!!Iy low except for alpha contaminct!on on
the concrete floor. Direct alphc.! readings on the floor were in the range
50-530 dpm/100 cm2 (see Fig. 9), and transferable alpha contamination levels
were· as high as 60 dpm/100 cm2 (Table 4). fxternaJ gamma radiation levels
. – at randomly selected points are given in Fig. JO. ·
Outdoor Measurements:· The property was divided into .blocks by a .50 ft x 50 ft
grid system (see Fig. 11). At each intersection of grid line.s,· beta-gamma dose

rates at· J an and external gamma radiation lewis at 1 m were determined •
. • ….. · . . . . . : .. ·· …..
~~———-··· , …
-· ‘-!.

\
– 5-
Results ore given in lobi e 7. J n cddi ti on, within each block maxi mum
beta-gamma dose rates were determined. Readings for those blocks where
. the maximum within the block exceeded the ~axirMJm of the four corners
are given in Fig. 11. It is evident from the resutb shown in Table 7 and
Fig. 11 that beta-gamma dose rates at t em above the surface exceed 0.20
mrad/hr outdoors over o significant portion of the property.
Resu I ts .o f S0 1” I Sa mp I e A ro I yses: Co ncentrah•o ns o f 226Ro , 238U , on d 227A c
i.n soi I sampt es coli ected during a presurvey visit and in one samp I e taken
from a surveyor’s work boots are presented in Table 6. 227
Ac is in the
235u
chain and is a daughter of
231
Pa which is known to have been present in
large quantities in some of the residues once stored at the former AEC St.
Louis Airport Storage Site. Strictest NRC limits ·ror ~emitters apply to this
ra d1• 0nucl “• de . 1t appears t ho t sJ• gm·!!n” cant quan t•1t •1 es o f 226Ra , 238U , and 227Ac
ore contained in the soil on the proper!)’, porticli!~dy in the dirt floor in
Po U·I1 d·• ng 1. Be cause no spec:•· r·J C e r~r orts were mao·e to cemove 230rh f rom
pitchblende residue~ stored at the airport site, it must a,e assumed that’ this
radionudide may be present in large quantities. A linited number of samples
will be analyzed for
230
Th. The ~ample whose locotigq is described as “in
.
and aroond BuHdings 1, 2, 3, and 4” was token from ·C surveyor’s boots and
was soil and mud from the area shown in fig. 2. This sample contained t20
pCi
226
Ra/g and 110 pCi
227
Ac/g; the concentration .tJi 230
Th hos not yet
been determined. This sample should be representative of the contamination
beins carried into homes by workers ond visitors on the sfte. •
..
i f
t
t l
1
I • ‘;
.:.:·.·.:.
•__ :
….
~:..
==:;
~
:· • .,!
….. _~
Table 1. Building 1, floor: measurements at grid points of beta-gamma
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
Grid point Beta-gamma dose r~te External gamma radiation
(Sec Fig. 3) at 1 em level at 1 m
(mrad/hr) {~R/hr)
Al 1.40 320
Bl 2.40 300
Cl 0.35 240
01 1.50 220
El 1.20 190
Fl 1.00 220
Gl 1.30 240
G2 1.00 160
F2 0.60 160
E2 0.40 190
D2 0.30 160
C2 0.30 160
B2 · u.s:> 180
….
“”” ·1.30 220
A3 1..30 240
B3 0.50 220
C3 0. 75 240 ..
D3 0.75 220
E3 0.70 210
F3 o.so 160
G3 o.so 120
C4 0.65 140
..
~
. ···-
~:
~===
:;:;
Table 1. (ccn~’d.)
Grid point
(See Fig. 3)
F4
.E4
D4
C4
84
A4
AS
BS
cs
05
ES
FS
…. ~
…. ¥
G~
F6
E6
D6
C6
86
A6
,,–.
.\ ‘ I
.Builcilng 1. floor: measurements at grid points of beta-gar.m:a·
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
Beta-gamma dose rate
at I’ em
(mrad/hr)
o.so
0.40
0.35
0.70
0.50
0.20
0.20
0.25
o.so
0.80
0.90
1.00
l.lU
1.60
l.SO
0.90
0.90
1.40
0.65
0.1~
External gawma radiation
level at· 1 m
(lJR/hr)
140
160
160
240
180
120
90
180
210
160
270
190
180
240
240
130
130
160
110
100
..:

.
-··
I
~-~
•.
Table 2. Building 2, floor: measurements at grid points of beta-gamma
· dose rates and external_ gamma radiation levels
Grid point Beta-gamma dose rate External. gar.:..”na radiation
(See Fig. 5) ~t !’em level at 1 m
(mrad/hr) (lJR/hr)
Al 0.08 80
Bl 0.08 45
Cl o.os 40
Dl 0.07 70
D2 0.15 80
C2 0.28 80
B2 0.13 55
A2 0.06 40
A3 0.08 55
83 0.10 45
C3 0.15 55
D3 0.15 105
D4 0.10 95
C4 0.08 65
84 0.14 65
A4 0.15 80


..:
Building
.. 1
2
3
4
Table 3. Direct measurements of a and B-y contamination levels
on upper walls and ceiling in Buildings 1, 2, 3, and 4
Number of Direct a measurements e-y dose
measurement5 Average Maximum Average
(dpm/lOOcm2 ) (dpm/100c:m2 ) (mr::~d/hr)
67 900 ssoo 0.24
36 280 1144 0.16
-16 so 360 0.07
10 cc. a~cause some radon an~ progeny from previous 2000-
cond intervals remain in the Wrenn chamber, each reading act1.:::1ly rep:::csents a concentr.l’!’:i.C;-,
ich has been intet:;J.·ated over a period of 2 to 4 hr.
: ~· t .. ·–· — . ·-· ·–· -~-….,.—:—–.. ·-………….. -. ______ …. ..
… –·
I ”
::-:-:”:”
·.
Table 6. Concentration of radionuc1ides in soil
samples taken inside and near buildings
Sample
location Depth 226Ra 2380
(pCi/g) (pCi/g)
In and around Buildings
1. 2, 3. and 4 surface 120 N.D. a
Building 2, grid point C3 surface 28 20
Building I. near grid
point 04 6 – 9 in. 240 190
Building 1, near grid
point 04 0 – 6 in. 130 200
Building 2, grid point B2 surface 16 17
Outdoors, near grid
point GlO surface 3 2.1
Outdoors, near grid point
a
JCS • near railro~d spur surfa.ce 2700 N.D.
Building 1. grid point Gl surface 430 860
Building 1. grid point E4 surface 320 550
On railroad spur. near Sh’
~u .. wer of 8uilding 1 surface 470 530
Building l, grid point C3 surface 190 420
Building 1, grid point Al surface 540 1100
aN.D. : not determined.
• : . , ….
.. ..
227Ac
(pCi/g)
110
16
260
140
11
.: 1.3
1300
530
370
390
230
700
.. l
. I
–·
• ~~
-.
~
§=
~-
;=; ;
~– m..
I
,_ \. ··- .
Table 7. Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-gamma
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
Grid point Beta-gamma dose rate External gamr.la radiation
(See Fig. ll) at 1 em level at l m
(mrad/hr) (llR/hr)
Al 0.04 20
A2 0.50 125
A3 0.50 220
A4 0.30 220
AS 0.”35 1SS
A6 . 0.20 155
A7 0.18 180
AS 0.18 170
A9 0.25 155
AIO 0.10 80
All 0.10 65
Al2 0.18 110
Al3 . 0.18 140
Al4 1.20 375
A15 0.18 110
Al6 0.13 45
Al7 0.13 45
Al8 0.11 80
Al9 o·.u 80
Bl 0.03
•. 25
..
82 0.08 55
83 0.20 95
– ··-·- – – ____ … _. .. _.. .. –·”•• .
.:
t : . . ·-· ·- ‘ .
table 7. (coat~d.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-gaE~a
dose rates and external_ gamma radiation levels
—-
” M ~.:.:
==
~~
::-::.
!’!” :.:..
=
:y;~ .
-~·· .
:
./ “”. \
‘-•:
Table·,. (cont’d.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-gamma
dose rates and external· gamma radiation levels
Grid point Bet~~amma dose’rate -External_. ga.t-nma radiation
(See Fig. 11) at 1 em level at l rn
(mrad/hr)
.
(llR/hr)
C8 0.08 30
C9 0.09 40
ClO 0.08 45
Cll 0.04 20
Cl2 o.os 25
Cl3 0.04 20
C14 0.03 20
ClS 0.04 25
Cl6. 0.05 20
Cl1 0.23 85
C18 0.21 125
Cl9 0.80 3 ….. f;)
C20 ·0.25 220
Dl 0.05 45
02 0.30 170
03 0.08 45
04 0.08 45
OS 0.10 40
06 0.1·3 ss
D7 0.06 . 45
D8 . 0.08 45
·’ ,” .
.· .. , ..
.. •. •
….. -·
)
I
\ ·.. ·1
. . I
!
.: ….

= ~
:c…·

~
···t
Table 7. (cont rd.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-gcurJna
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
Grid point Bet~-gamma dose rate External gamma radiation
(See Fig. 11} at l em level a’t 1 m
(mrad/hr) (~R/hr)
09 0.10 45
010 0.08 45
Dll 0.04 25
D12 0.03 20
Dl3 0.03 20
014 0.03 20
DIS o.os 30
Dl6 0.08 45
Dl7 0.08 45
018 0.08 45
Dl9 0.08 65
020 0.15 220
El 0.55 190
E2 0.06 40
E3 0.04 40
E4 0.06 30
ES 0.05 40
E6 0.06 45
E7 o.os 30
E8 o.os .30
E9 0.04 20
.ElO 0.03 25 .
·- …. -···-. -.– ·–· – —–·
.– — ··-··· … –

‘ !

• ‘:””-:.:,.
:
~
==·
~
~~;
-~~i
‘ ,
Table 7. (cont’d.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of b~~a-garr~a
dose rates and external. gamma radiation levels
Grid point
{See Fig. ll)
Ell
El2
El3
El4
ElS
El6
E17
El8
E19
E20
Fl
F2
F.3
f4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FlO
Fll
Fl2
Beta-gamma dose rate
at l em
.. : . >
(mrad/hr)
0.03
0.04
0.04
0.08
0.08
0.14
0.06
0.06
0.06
0.55
0.15
0.10
0.10
0.18
0.28
0.08
0.06
0.06
0.10
0.06
0.05
0.06
External ga~”a radiation
level at· 1 m
(JJR/hrj
20
25
30
35
40
85
35
30
45
150
140
45
80
140
95
65
25·
45
50
45
40
40
..

… – — ·- ··–~— -..
_.
i
i
t
t
t
-·~)
—‘ /-·.. .
; .) \ …
Table 7. {cont’d.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-ga~~a
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
…..
il ·-~·~”!
. . ~
:=.! ..
~
~
~
!..:.~. === :
;;;; -‘l .
.- ‘””;
Table 7. (cont’d.) Outdoor measurements at grid points of beta-garr~a
dose rates and external gamma radiation levels
Grid point Bet~-gamma dose rate External gar..rna radi. ~··:
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Yellow
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o.o<- -- ·'· \ .. . · ....... . ·- .-.. ·.•·:~ . : ~··: . •. -·. .·: .. .... :~ ~:~-~ ~~ . ..: ·- . ~~ ... -~··· r·...-- .:~· ;~~ ......... - ~:·r~- . ·:. . .·: ..... :, . ... · . ; ..... , ... ~,. 0.01 .,#~'" • .• ---· .• '.*· .• o.os 0.15 0.01 0.02 0.02 o.o1 0.02' 0.02 0.100.02 0.01 0.01 0.04 0.15 o. 04 o. 03 o.os RADIATION MONITORING SURVEY 0.04 0.03 0.07 Values of Gross Activity in MR/hr. at approximately three feet above qrade. April 29, 1974 0.1 0.25 ·"' ;. ~.. . .. .. . .. . :: ·. . . : .· ._.. .. . ..•.. 0.03 .. ~ o. 07 :..-: .. ~·7 .. ;. .·,.. 0~ 0 0.40 0.12