1972-12-05 – Cotter Corporation – Decontamination of Latty Avenue Storage Site, Hazelwood Missouri

1972-12-05-cotter-corporation-decontamination-of-storage-site-hazelwood-missouri

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WLA 2154
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tr. Frar~< ?it~nan, Pirec~or Divisic:~ cf W ~t:.a i-;ar.age~;ot: and Trans~or~ati~;o U.S. Ato::tic En\;r~y Ccr=.ission WashinEt~n, D.C. 205~5 Dece10e.r S, 1!:7 . Re: Cot:t:e~ Cor?cration-Decontaminat:ion of Storaz.a Si :-s, ~a::el""·ood, Hi..ssot.:ri Cott:c~ Cor~c~a~ion sub~its he~~with a orc~csa: fo~ ceco:1t:~=.ina~i~~ cf th~ si~ a a~ Lat:~y Avar.ue, fiez~ l\,oc::!, l·:.izso~=-i u;c::1 ·~~.:.c:t ce!'~clin r-z:.~ioac-:.i•Je r~si·.!ue~ cic:--ivad fror:: t: ite prccessi::~ of Co;;;.:o m"'a!"•i u::-. o:-cz have been store!oration al’.d 5 & :…
Const~c~ion Coo~a~y, !nc. 7 which set fo~h L~ de~ail~
the ~:u,e~ in wale~ t~e deconta~~tion orocess will
be ef!ec:tec. –
As ycu and your s~aff ~iow, Cot~er Cor?ora~io»
a~quireci tr.e residue cat:eri~l ~, lS67, and in ~h~
in~eri~, r~:ov~~,;rocessed and ~de ult~ate dispcsi~
ic~ of all resi~ues ~hich coulc eco~o:ically
be ~rea~~d except for 1:,uoo “tens oi Colcraco
raf£~ia-:=~ ~~ic~ ~i~l be shi?P=~ to the ~ll L~ ~t~
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WLA 2155
near future. The then re::naining ::.a:tarial, which is
t~e subject of this proposal, consis~s prir.cipally
of leae~ec bari~ sulfate, niseellar.eous residues
and da~ris, cocprising approximately a,soo tons.
We have ex~lored all altar~a~iv~s to dis~ositicn
at the Quarry DUr.p Site ~~d conclude tha~ none of the~
offer comparable advantages in terms of safety, convenience
and econo~cs. The Quarry Dump Site alreaay
contains similar raaioactive waste and must be consi~eraa
a permanent burial area, and its location in relation
to the Hazelwood stcrage site L~sures safe transpor~atic~
ove~ a distance ma~y ti~es shorter than the nearest
available alterna~ive.
We stand ready tc provi~a any !frr~her inforr~tiov
which you ~1 dasire i~ considering ~~d a~ting upon ‘
this proposal.
Ve~y truly yours,
COTTZ:R CORPORA.TIOi’j
By: ~a-.:J p. m ~·:ZI–
oav~c:; ?. ,.a;::-co”C~,
txecu~ive Vice Presidan~
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PROPOSAL
for
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DECONT~1INAT!ON OF LATTY AVENUE STO~.GE S!TE
HAZEL~·:OCD I HISSOURI
AEC License No. SUB 1022 (40-8025)
May, 1972
RETA-780
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INTRODUCTION
rt is the intent of this proposal to provide a
means whereby land leased by Cotter Corporaticn of Golden,
Colorado (t~e Licensee} may be decontaminated and returned
for•no~al ~and use with no restrictions, in full compliance
with all applicable rules a..11d regulations of the Atomic
Energy Co~ssion. The property in question consists of
Hazelwood, Missouri {see FI~J?~ 1).
D~~ recent years, the area has been use~ as a
.
.. storage and processing site for raffinates and c~~er radioactive
res~dttes, and other radioactive debris. This proposal
presents a plan of action for decontamination of the site and
ultimate disposal of the radioactive residues and debris •
RETA-780

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–· RETA &
CD
Settling
Ponds
FIGURE 1
Latty Avenue
Sketch net to scale
Colorado
Raffinate
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COTTER CORPORATIOU
lATTY AVE::UE STORAG:: SITE
HAZLEH00}, iU SSOUR I
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DESCRIPTION OF WASTE MATERIAL
The history of the residues is a long and complicated
one. The most complete historical review of this
material was compiled by Walter J. Raubach in August, 1967.
This review is included hereLn as APP~~~IX A.
According to Mr. Bauback, the original material
was obtained from the Belgian congo in 1944 for processing
by_Mallinckrodt at the Destrehan Street Plant in St. Louis.
acre trac~, located at Roberston, Missouri. In J~~e of 1960
the residues were offered for public sale for processing or
utilizaticr. by private industry.
•T.he intent of the ‘Offer for Sale’ was to allow
private industry to recover the valuable metals: copper,
nickel ~~d ccbal~ • . The original request for bid offered ~~e
bidder several al~ernatives. The pur~~aser could use the
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existing site for purposes of concentrating and extracting
any desired material, or he could remove the residue from
the site for processing or utilization elsewhere. The
materials remaining qfter the purchaser’s processing operations
were over, could be disposed of oy b~e purchaser at the
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Weldon Springs dump site whether or not processing was done .
on the present site or elsewhere. The Weldon Springs Quarry
Dump site was a pit located in St. Charles County on Missouri
State Bighway No . 94 apprc:;;imately five :niles SO’.!th~·;es t of
the Weldon Springs plant and approximately 30 miles from the
airport site. The site was accessible by tru~~ from Missouri
State Route 94 and a spur track lead off the eristi:1g east
way of. the Atcmic Energy Co~~ssion•s plant track system providing
railway access to the dump pit.”
Later in 1960, word was received that it was quite
.-unlikely that the private contract would be awarded since ~~e
United States Geological Survey forbade the dumping of the sludges,
processed or not, into the quarries in question because of the
high probability of contaminating the Missouri River shortly
above the im:akes for the St. Louis City and St. Louis County
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WLA 2109
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water supplies. Due to the many problems, the St. Louis
Area Office was contacted by Oak Ri dge Operations and asked
to hold up awarding any contract on airport sludge.
The material was subsequently obtained, in 1964,
(see APPENDIX B) by Continental Mining & Milling Company of
Chicago, Illinois. Continental bor rowed $2,500,000 from
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Commercial Discount of Chicago to buy ane p~ocess the residues ,
using the resieues as security . Continental mvved tt~e mate=ial
from the airpor t to the present site on Latty Avenue. This move
required t en d~~ t–u~~ s for five months and cost Continental
$100 , 000. They were unable to maintain the loan pa~nnents while
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they w.ere moving the material, so Commercial foreclosed ti · 1..:~ ~-~- – · .. ·
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The Cornroercial Discount Corporation paid $800,000
for the raffinates at a public auction of the assets of the
·· Continental Mining & Milling Company. lt was their only recourse
to protect the $2,500,000 investment they had in the raffinates.
In this foreclosure procedure, t hey obtained besides the 100,000
tons of waste mat erial, an office building, · three plant buildings
and the prope~t upon which the residues are now stored. ThE~e
R..~A-780
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residues were again offered for sale at a public auction on
February 3, 1967, and they failed to draw a single bid.
Commercial D. iscount decided to process the residues
themselves by drying and shipping them to Cotter corporation
for mineral extraction (License No. SMC-907 (40-7603)]. The\
consulting firm of Ryckman, Edgerley, Toml~nson and Associat~s
(RETA), were retained to advise them on radiological heal~~
and industrial hygiene problems. In Novembe~, 1968, Co~~ercial •
Discount discontinued operation and the site was shut down.
In August, 1970, Cotter Corporation began d=Yi~g
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assist them with personnel monitoring ~~d related =aeiological
health aspects. In-August, 1971, Cotter Corporation had completec
shi?ment of the Ccn;o raffinates to ~~eir processing
site in Colorado. Low concentrations of valuable metals and
other elements rendered the remaining material economically
unfeasible to process in like manner.
Pre~~ntly, the remaining mat~rial stored on the site
includes (see FIGURE 2):
RETA-780
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–· RETA &
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LATTY
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AREA WHICH
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STRIPPED •
RU99”. & ~ MISC. DEBRIS :
COLORADO
RAFFINATE l
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FIGURE 2·
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COTTER CORPORATION
LATTY AVENUE
PROCESSING SfTE ·
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(1) Colorado Raffinate- 15,000 tons,
containing about 4S tons of uranium.
(2) Leached Barium Sulfate Cake- 8,700
WLA 2112
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tons, :ontaining about 7 tons of urani~~.
(3) Miscellaneous Residues – approximately
200 tons, containing approximately 2 tons
of u.raniun.
These resicues are stored in deteriorated steel drums
and sparsely distributed aw~ng pieces of clothing, boots, floor
tile and other debris which render t he small aiUount of uranium
economically unobtainable. The drums are dete~ioratec to such
A more detailed description of the material remaining
can be found in A??ENDIX 3, pages S-11.
DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES
Referring to F:i:G”‘uRE .2, Bui!din9 “D” is the only buildillg
whic.~ wil! r;.~e decontaminatior: . !3uilding .. A” is an
office while Buildings •a” and ~c” were used for maintenance and
RETA-780
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storage,only. These ~~ree buildings were protected from
contamination by radioactive dust during ~~e drying operations •
.Building-. “O!’ housed the drying operations a.”ld is
slightly contaminated (:0.5 mr/hr}. To deconta~nate this
building it is first necessary to disma”ltle and steam clPA~
the dryer, conveyors, air pollution equipment, and other
miscellaneous ma~~ine~J. This equipment will then be ha~-~¥
from the ·site for subsequent salvage.
After all equipment is removed from the building,
its earthen floor will be stripped to eighteen (18″} inches
below ~riginal grade* The ceiling and walls will then be
scrubbed to remove any dust ?articles. Finally, the earthen
floor will be brought back up to existing grade using clean,
compacted fill material.
~e second step of decontamination requires that
all uncontaminated solid wastes be remcvee tc a licensed
.sanitary landfill.· Items which will be removed include logs,
trees, brush, abandoned appliances and other miscellaneous
RETA-780
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WLA 2114
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debris,_ which has been dumped on the site by area residents
during periods when the operation had been shut down.
All remaining Colorado raffinate will be loaded
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into railroad cars and shipped to Cotterts processing site
for storage. At present, no economical means exist for extracting
additional metals from this material. The procedure
to be used for shipping the Colorado raffinates will be si~lar
to that for the Congo residue, except that the drying operation
will be omitted.
After the Colorado raffinate is removed, the remaining
de?ris, including the leached barium sulfate, will be t~cked
to the Weleon Springs Quarry dump site, as per the original
1960 proposal. After removal of the radioactive materials
from the area, the top soil will be stripped to a depth of 18” ,
.-or until radioactivity levels come below specified limits (Title
10, Section 20.105}. ~his material will be used to provide cover
for the residues in the Quarry.
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WLA 2115
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To recapitulate, it is proposed that the Weldon
Springs Quarry Dump site be used as ult~~te disposal for
the following materials:
Leached Barium Sulfate 2800 c.y.
.Rubble & Other Debris 1000 c.y.
Deteriorated Steel Drums
& Miscellaneous Ite~s 1000 c.y.
Stripped Top Soil 19200 c.y.
TOTAL QUANTITY (approx.) 24000 c.y.
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· A cursory visit to the quarry on May 3, 1972, showed
the area to be satisfactory for this use. The entire
premises is a secured area,,adequately fenced and equipped with
caution sigr.s. Evidence of past dumping was quite visible and
showed a mound of reinforced concrete rubble, steel dr~~s,
miscellaneous construction metals, an abandoned fork lift and
·othe~ equip~ent. The floor of the quarry is easily accessible
from State Highway 94. By carefully placing the radioactive
. residues and covering them with the stripped top soil, the
dumping of this material could, indeed, enha~ce the overall
appearance of the site.
R:E:TA-780
WLA 2116
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As noted in the 1960 proposal, there is some concern
with possible contamination of water supplies. It should
be noted, however, that the quarry is placed high above the
flood level of the river and; hence; there is no danger of
flooding the quarry. Also, past experience with the residues
at the Latty Avenue site demonstrated that the material does
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not exhibit a tendency to “leach” into the ground water. Since
beginning work with the residues in FebruarJ, 1967, there has
been no evidence of ground wa~er cont&~ination at ~~e storage
site.
RETA-780
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RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH PROTECTIO~ PROGRAMS
Because of its inherent. physical properties and/or \
radioactivity level, major health problems are not a~ticipa~ed.
Precautio~s will be taken, however, to insure that no conditions
develop which will endanger the health apd safety of
employees and the general public.
Personnel Monitoring
As stated in the Application for source Material License,
(see APPENDIX C) “each worker will be issued a fiL~ badge.” It
is proposed ~~at for the decont~~nation work, the film badge program
be discontinued. Under Section 20.202 (a) {1), personnel
monitoring is mandatory for persons, over 18 years of age,
-· entering a restricted area that receives, or is likely
to receive, a dose in any calendar quarter in excess of 25 percent
of ~~e al!owable dosage. Previous experienc~ (see TABLE 1)
has demonstrated that employees working at the site have not
been exposed to dosages in excess of the allowable 25 percent.
RETA-780
(~)
BADGE NO.
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
NO.
TABLE 1
PERSO~~L MONITORING RECORDS*
LATTY AVENUE STOR}.GE SITE
HAZELNOOD, MISSOURI
CUMULATIVE DOSAGE
WEEKS DOSAGE PER WEEK
22 M
22 120
12 90
22 210
22 230 10.5
12 60
20 200
10 50
21 210
4 M
Not Issued
11 120
ll 120
11 130 ll.S
Average dosage – 1.8 mr/~k = 101.4 mr/qtr.
Maximum allowable without personnel monitoring;
25% of 1-1/4 rem = 312.5 mr/qtr.
WLA ~118
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MAX. QTRLY.
DOSAGE ‘
Control
136.5 mr
153.4 mr
*Records obtained from Film Badge monitoring program for
period of drying operation (8/70-2/71).
RETA-780
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WLA 21 l .[._. __ ___lil_ St_a:e_ ~;_ci·_Mix_er ____ _..,. _..~. — H,’,,” 03
~————-~ Saub
Aqut!.OUS
to
Waste
Organi~
(]
H~o3
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1
.::::::;.;– o~:::~~:~
Sttil”.\, 10 Stage Kidi·Mixer Scrub
~
Organic
to
Recovery
Aqueous Product
Centrifuge
. . .
A flowsheet for tne removal of otnar than the thoriu~ and uranium
has noc been developed and this now see~s a reasonabl~ Ching to
do at chis point. I£ ten or fif:een c=u~s of this ~ac~rial were
p~ocessed to dev~lop a flowsheet for the ~ecovery of the tho~iu~,
uranium, copper, nickel, cobalt, seleniu~, and a ~are earth fraction,
it migh~ be possible to raduce L~e ~adioactive contamin~tion
of the final waste raffinates such that they would be no problem
and could be disposed of almo·s·c anywn.ere.
The 250 kilogr~s of thorium-230 contained in these raf!inates
are more interesting than ionium per se; cost esti~ates are already
in existence for irradiation to protactinium-231 and subsequent
irradiation co uraniuc-232. Mound has ~welve thoriurn-230″slugs
on hand that were irradiated in the MIR at Idaho Falls i~ 1960.
It· •is planned to process these capsules in order 😮 develop a flowsheec
for the production of ?rotac~iniu~-231.
Augusc 15,. 1967
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· APPEND I X “B”
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